CRISPIN UPDATE

1. Ribauld de Chateauneuf, Lord of Brezolles, Regemallard, Sorel, Fontaine-le-Riboux (to which he gave his name), who held considerable land in Dreux, with him sometimes being named Ribauld de Dreux.

1.1. “Fidelismus Alberius filius Ribaldi, Nobilissimi viri”; or “Nobilissimi Ribaldi filius”, named as such in a charter of St. Pere, in which he donated the Church of St. Germain de Brezolles, his father’s foundation.

In 1060, another lord of this region, Gazo (Gaston de Chateauneuf) founded a priory on the left bank of the Eure in Croth, given to the abbey Of Marmoutier. Gaston was the son of Raoul le Barbu (father -in-law of William Crispin II. (this marriage being a French/Norman peace treaty), and succeeded in establishing himself at Chateauneuf-de-Thymerais. He founded the family of Châteauneuf, and held the seigneury of Brézolles (c. 1060) at the death of Albert Ribaud. His foundation of the priory of Croth was approved by Hugues Bardoul, his lord. The Charter was confirmed by the King Philip I.

On the right bank of the Eure, opposite Croth, Gaston was established at Sorel, where his son Hugh de Châteauneuf (c. 1078) met with those who opposed Robert Courteheuse, then in revolt against his father, William the Conqueror.

Hugh de Châteauneuf’s feudal rights extended as far as Anet, as is shown by a charter of Saint-Père relating to land at Cussay. Under the authority of Gaston de Châteauneuf, the abbey of Saint-Père made the church of Saint-Georges-de Brezolles into a priory.

“Le plus ancien seigneur connu de Rosny fut Raoul, dit le Barbu, Radulfus malus vicinus cognomento ad barbam, comme il s’appelle lui-même dans une charte sans date qu’il donna à l’abbaye de Coulomb et dans laquelle il mentionne la présence de ses fils : Robert, Raoul, Guiard et Guerrie (Duchesne, Extrait de Coulomb; Bibl. nat., collection Baluze, I. XXXVIII, fo 27.). Orderic Vital raconte que ce furent les ravages que ce Raoul Mauvoisin et les autres chevaliers de Mantes avaient exercés au delà de l’Eure, dans le diocèse d’Evreux, qui attirèrent sur cette ville la colère de Guillaume le Conquérant qui la réduisit en cendres en 1087, et y mourut en traversant ses débris encore fumants (Ord. Vital, liv. VII. chap. II.). Raoul le Barbu eut pour successeur l’un de ses fils, Gui Ier Mauvoisin, qui en 1119 était l’un des alliés d’Amaury de Montfort disputant, les armes à la main, à Henri, roi d’Angleterre, le comté d’Evreux qui lui appartenait de droit héréditaire (Ord. Vital, livre XII, chap. vi.)”. (See Auguste Moutié, Chevreuse: Chatelains, barons et ducs, p. 234, 1876).

Amaury de Montfort was a cousin of the Crispins, William Crispin I., father of William Crispin II., and son of Gilbert Crispin I., having married Eve de Montfort. William Crispin III., son of William Crispin II., fought on the side of Amaury de Montfort at the battle of Bremule, nearly slaying Henry I., who was only saved by the quality of his armour.

A gift of his rights over Verneuil by a certain Richard was made in the consent of Gilbert Crispin I., Lord of Tillières, whose close connections with Albert’s family is demonstrated: Garin de Rémalart also gave his assent, connecting the area of Verneuil with the familia of Chateauneuf. This act shows the complexity of interpreting data of this time. Was land passed to those related, or conferred by the ducal family? Both. In this regard, there is no proof that Gaston de Chateauneuf was related to Albert Ribaud.

Gilbert Crispin II. and his wife, Hersende, named a son Ribaud, suggesting that she was of Albert Ribaud’s family.

Hugh de Châteauneuf confirmed a donation of Gilbert Crispin II. to Bec of land at Brezolles.

Gilbert Crispin I. almost certainly married Gunnora d’Anet, daughter (on chronological grounds) of Foulques d’Anet, son of Osmund de Centville, son of Osborn de Crépon and Emma, daughter of Raoul d’Ivri (Count Rodolph), uterine brother of Duke Richard I. There is no proof that Osmund de Centville was related to an earlier personage of that name.

This identification of Gilbert’s wife answers M. Le Prevost’s statement that there was an apparent association between the Crispin and FitzOsborn family, without the basis of that association being known. ‘Nous ignorons à quel titre Gislebert Crespin etait appele à ratifier cette donation; mais nous supposons que ce pouvait être à raison de quelque alliance avec la famille d’Ivri, dont le souvenir est perdu (‘Ordericus Vitalis’, ed. le Prevost et. al., p. 398, 1840).

The son of Raoul d’Ivri, Hugh, Bishop of Bayeux, succeeded him after 1015. Much of his vast possessions passed to the son of his brother-in-law, Osbern de Crépon. It was Osborn’s son, William FitzOsbern, the Conqueror’s seneschal, who established the honor of Breteuil, including possessions from Breteuil-sur-Iton (Eure) to Pacy.

Land once held by Hugh, Bishop of Bayeux devolved to the (Ivri) kinsmen William FitzOsbern and Gilbert CrIspin I., who died in the time of Abbot Herluin (Milo Crispin), who died August 26, 1078.

An illigitimate daughter of Hugh, Bishop of Bayeux, Aubree, m. (1) Robert d’Ivry; their son was probably Raoul de la Cunelle (‘Rodulfus de Cunella‘); an (Ivri) kinsman of the Crispins, which explains why Ralph de la Cunelle was their vassal. Gunnor d’Anet and Ralph de la Cunelle were first cousins, once removed. It is said that Auberée married (2) Albert de Cravent, and was mother of his children, which is chronologically problematic, though not impossible. She may have been Albert’s second wife.

Raoul de la Cunelle’s name was taken from Thimerais, wherein Chateauneuff, a pun being “wild thyme” (Cunelle), which is a different orthography from the Anglo-Saxon Cnoll (Knoll) and other derivatives, meaning a hill, summit; an extremely common source of toponyms in England. Cunelle or Quenele was in Boissi-sur-Damville, the Crispin fief, held under the “de Brionne” family.
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CONTINUATIONS OF ASSOCIATION – BRISTOL TO VIRGINIA

We can look back in time through different prisms, each giving a slightly different perspective. One such perspective can be gained through John Seward, a Bristol-born merchant, who held land in Somerset, and who was involved in the headright trade in Virginia, where he patented land in 1638: Upon Warresquioke River. Beginning at a pynie pint by a little gutt running into the woods right over against the land of Nathaniell Floyd* and near his former pattent. “Francis Hobbs’now wife Mary was former wife of Nathaniel Floyd deceased”. Francis Hobbs’ da. was the wife of John Harris, son of Thomas Harris, who died in 1672. Francis Hobbs Jr. left a legacy to “cousin John Davis”, and “brother John Harris”; his Will being recorded 9 June 1688.

Nathaniel Floyd, 850 acres, 20 November 1637. 600 acres being a neck about 4 miles up the main creek and lying between 2 creeks, and 250 up near the head of the main creek, for the trans. of 17 persons among whom was Ambrose Proctor and Mathew Tomlin.

The inventory of Edward Harris, d. 1677, states that he owed money to “Mrs Davis”; almost cartainly the wife of John Davis, i.e. Mary Greene; da. of Thomas Greene and Mary Moone, and cousin of Martha Greene, who m. Anthony Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset, whose son, Michael Fulgham, m. Anne Izzard; having issue (1) Anne Fulgham, who m. Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688. (2) Susannah Fulgham, who m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council Jr. and Lucy Hardy. In IOW Court, January 11, 1672, Thomas Tooke (associated with Thomas Harris, who died in 1672), as attorney, calls John Davis “his loving brother”.

THE DAVIES FAMILY:

1. Samuel Davis, “A griffin segreant”; friend of Thomas Pitt, father of William Pitt, as follows.
1.1. Rice Davis, Esquire, of Tickenham, Somerset, married: (1) Dorothy, daughter of Maurice Rodney Esq. thus becoming a kinsman of the Hodges family of Wedmore. Their daughter, Elizabeth, married to Roger Williams, of Monmouthshire. (2) Isabel, daughter of Henry Lygon of Colne, Gloucestershire, widow of Edward Basset. (3) Mary Pitt, sister of William Pitt, and widow of Robert Owen of Bristol, merchant, by whom a daughter married Nicholas Poyntz. Their daughter, Eleanor, married Major William Goodriche.
1.2. John Davis.
1.2.1. John Davis, m. Alice Knight, 9 October 1606.
1.2.1.1. William Davis, bapt. 12 April 1607. Thomas Floyd headright of William Davis, James City, 1639.
1.3. Abraham Davies.
1.3.1. Richard Davis esq, of Tickenham, bapt. 8 Nov 1587, m. Mary Owen, da. of Robert Owen, of Bristol and n.b. Carmarthanshire.
1.3.1.1. Robert Davis (involved in various litigations concerning the Owen estate).
1.3.1.1.1. John Davis, bapt. 17 April 1637; d. bef. 28 June 1714, m. Mary Green. The Will of John Davis of the Upper Parish, dated Dec. 31, 1712, names da. Mary the wife of William Murray, brother William Green, friends Nathaniel Ridley (associated with Thomas Harris, d. 1672), and James Day to make the division of my estate. Thomas Harris (d. 1672) 40 acres, 14 Aug. 1652. At the head of one of the branches of the Pagan Cr., bounded with his own land on N.E. Fran. Smith on S.W., Thomas Prichard on S.E. and John Davis on N.W. for trans. Peter Bell.
1.3.1.1.1.1. Sarah Davis, d. ob. ante 6 January 1720, m. Nicholas Fulgham, son of Anthony Fulgham and Martha Green.
1.3.1.1.1.1.1. Nicholas Fulgham, m. Martha Pitt.
1.3.1.1.1.1.1.1. Elizabeth Fulgham, m. Thomas Applewhaite, son of Henry Applewhaite, who moved from Barbados to IOW Co., before 1668, when he purchased 100 acres from Roger Davis. Henry Applewhaite is mentioned in the Will of George Williams, R. 9 Oct. 1672, as is “Mr. William Bressie and his wife Susanna, if it shall please God to send them back to Virginia”. This Indenture made the Eleaventh day of October, in the four & twentieth Year of the reigne of our Sov’eigneLord Charles the second … in ye year of our Lord God 1672. Between James Seward of the Citty of Bristoll in England merchant Sonne of John Seward late of the said Citty m’chant deceased (who dyed in Virginia) of the one part And William Bressie m’chant now resident in ye said Citty of Bristoll, of the other part”.
1.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Henry Applewhaite, d. 1739, m. Mary Council, da. of Hardy Council and Susannah Fulgham. Henry Applewhite’s estate was returned by Philip and Mary Brantley. R. Sept. 23, 1745. Susannah Council’s legatee was da. Mary Brantley. Halifax Co NC. R. 6 Oct. 1757. Edward Brantley was a headright of John Seward, as given elsewhere,
1.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Henry Applewhaite, of the parish of St Luke, d. 1783, m. Ann Harris. Marriage bonds of Henry Applewhite and Ann Harris, Nov. 7, 1756. Ann Harris was the da. of Edward Harris, grandson of Thomas Harris, d. 1688
1.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Mary Applewhite, m. John Barham, son of Benjamin Barham (grandson of Charles Barham, connected to Thomas Harris, d. 1672), of the parish of St Luke, Will R. 10 June 1779, witnessed by James Ridley, son of Nathaniel Ridley (half brother of William Ridley and Elizabeth Day, the relict of Matthew Jones, and da. of John Day and Mary Bennett, da. of Edward Bennett, br.-in-law of Richard Harris, of Wivelscombe, Somerset. John and Mary (Bennett) Day had issue: Elizabeth Day, who m. firstly (17 Oct. 1706) Capt. Nathaniel Ridley; secondly Matthew Jones; their son, James Ridley, m. Jane Smith, da. of Col. Arthur Smith, whose son, Arthur Smith II., m. Sarah Jackson, sister of Mary, wife of George Hardy, an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677.
1.3.1.2. Samuel Davis. 4 Oct. 1640: Sir Francis Wyatt granted to Samuel Davis 100 ac.on a branch of Pagan Creek, adj. Nathaniel Floyd. He m. Isabell Wallis, 27 Oct. 1624. (*Thomas Wallis headright of Thomas Davis, James city, 1638. Samuell Hudson, headright of Mr. Thomas Wallis, James City Co, 1638).

Wrington (Somerset) was near to the main abodes of the Davis family. In this regard, it can not be discounted that Edward Harris, d. 1677, was of Wrington; especially as his family were intermarried with ones of Wallis and Andrews, as the Davis family.

There may be little point in assuming a very close relationship between Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and Edward Harris, d. 1677, as the family they came from was so exremely interbred with families in their kinship group that what appears in analysis of DNA to be a close connection is usually much more distant.

1. Robert Harris, bur. 20 Mar. 1579.
1.1. John Harris, b. 25 Mar. 1545; bur. 27 Jan. 1596.
1.1.1. John Harris, m. (1) Alice Rumney 20 May 1572; (2) Anne Batten, 22 Sept. 1576, who may have been of the family related to the Pitts.
1.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, b. 30 Mar. 1577 (the elder; bur. 4 Dec 1635) m. Isabell Longe, 23 Oct. 1614).
1.1.1.1.1. Thomas Harris (the younger); bur. 20 May 1636.
1.1.1.1.1.1. Richard Harris, bapt. 22 Jul. 1629.
1.1.1.1.1.2. Thomas Harris, bapt. 4 Aug. 1633; bur. 30 Oct. 1661.
1.1.1.1.2. Edward Harris, bapt. 1 Oct. 1619.
1.2. William Harris, m. Agnes Heale, 22 Apr. 1559.
1.2.1. Edward Harris, m. Jone Young, 17 Feb. 1584.
1.2.2. William Harris, m. (1) Agnes Wallis, 20 Jun. 1587; (2) Jone Andrewes, 7 Nov. 1595.

John Seward was a headright of John Moone, in Warrasquinoake, in 1635, kin of the Fulghams: Anthony Fulgham’s brother, Thomas, having married Mary (Moone) Green, half-sister of Sarah Moone, wife of John Pitt, of Bristol, grandson of William and Mary Pitt:

“Mary Pitt of the parish of St. Thomas within the city of Bristol, widow”, Will proved 25 November 1634. “To my daughter Anne Edwardes sixty pounds &c. and my ring with a “Turkie” stone therein … To my son Robert Pitt* all that my lands and grounds,with the appurtenances &c, which I lately purchased of one Thomas Cowdry, being part of the manor of Compton Magna in the County of Somerset … To William Edwards my grandchild one silver and gilt beaker. Another to John Pitt my grandchild. To my grandchild Robert Pitt one silver and gilt salt cellar and to my grandchild John Edwards a silver beer bowl”. (Seager, 97). *Col. Robert Pitt, d. bef. 9 January 1674, Isle of Wight, VA. He was Captain of the Thunder, a merchant ship out of Bristol and a Colonel in the Virginia Militia. His son, John Pitt, married Olive, dau. of John Hardy and Alice Bennett. She married 1. Giles Driver, headright of Thomas Harris, d. 1672. John Seaward’s daughter, Margaret, m. John Edwards, 28 January 1633, Temple Church, Bristol.

The Pitts of Bristol, and their familial relationships, almost certainly provide many ‘continuations of association’ in Virginia.

PITT/PYKE/KITCHEN

William Pitt of the city of Bristol merchant, Will proved 4 February 1624. “To my loving wife Mary (Owen) five hundred pounds. To my son William two hundred and fifty pounds. To my son Robert three score and ten pounds. To my son Henry* two hundred and fifty pounds. To my son Thomas two hundred and fifty pounds. I give to my brother in law Mr Richard Davis twenty shillings to make him a ring for a token and to sister Mary Davis a double Harry sovereign of gold … and do appoint my well beloved cousins Mr. William Pitt, draper, and (n.b.) Mr Nicholas Pikes, gent, overseers. Witnessed by Richard Marlowe, Nicholas Pike and Richard Griffeth. Published (after alterations made) 30 October 1624, in presence of William Pitt, Edward Batten, Abraham Edwards. *Captain Henry Pitt, of Pagan Creek, who married 2. Ann, widow of Robert Watson. His son, Thomas, married Col. Athur Smith’s daughter, Mary.

Nicholas Pikes was the son of John Pyke of Bristol, and Alice Thorne, filia prima of Nicholas Thorne of Bristol. Their son, Nicholas Pyke, married Margaret, da. of John Poulton, draper of Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire (PROB 11/121/769 28 June 1613). Their son, Walter Pyke, born 1619, is mentioned in the will (dated 24 May 1651) of Robert Guy, of Doynton, Gloucestershire, as his “brother”; the will naming Walter’s sons as John, Walter, William, and Thomas.

The Bristol Charities: Commissioners’ report: “In an old parish book, containing abstracts of various instruments of conveyances, leases, and other writings (page 103), a deed is in substance set forth, dated 20th January, 20 James I, whereby Abel Kitchen the elder, and John Rowberow, of Bristol, two of the surviving executors of Robert Kitchen, late Alderman of the said city, did grant unto Robert Kitchen, Abel Kitchen the younger, Humfrie Read, and others, for ever, one annuity or yearly rent of 31.2s. to be issuing out of the two several messuages or tenements situate in Broad-street, within the parish of Christ-Church, in the said city, being part of the messuages or tenements called the New Market; to hold to them, their heirs, and assigns.

An ancient copy of the will of Abel Kitchen was produced, dated 19th January, 1639, containing the following clauses:– “Item.—Igive, devise, and bequeath, to the poor people of the parish of Christ-Church, in the said city, the annuity of 20s. and 6s. a year, which I late purchased of Walter Gilson, of Bedminster, to be paid to the churchwardens of the said parish, for the time being, to be distributed in bread, by sixpence a week for ever, to three poor people of that parish, every Sunday, in such manner as the gift of Mr. Robert Kitchen, alderman, deceased, is now given and distributed”.

Robert Kitchen. June 19 1594: Robert Kitchen, Alderman of Bristol. To be buried at St. Stephen`s near Johan my 1st wife. Land and houses to Robert, son of Matthew Haviland of Bristol, Merchant. William and John sons of Matthew Haviland. My wife Justine. My brother Matthew Kitchin. His son (Abel) my nephew £30. Agnes and Margaret daughters of my said brother Matthew Kitchin. To my sister Agnes £10. To Robert Kitchin son of my brother Richard Kitchin of London,£100 and an annuity of £2 13 4d. To my brother Thomas Kitchin 40s. Elizabeth and Jane daughters of my brother John Kitchin. Proved 10 January 10 1594 by John Barker, Matthew Haviland, John Rowberrough, and Abel Kitchin. 11 Jly. A Richard Kitchen m. Alice Pittes, 10 January 1594, Temple Church, Bristol. In July 1646, Thomas Derick, of the famiy associated with Sergeant John Harris, m. Austen Kitchin, Temple Church, Bristol.

William Morecombe v. Roger Ley, John Seller: “Impost of Spanish and French wines brought into England, particularly into the port of Barnstaple (Devon),” granted by Queen Elizabeth to Robt., late Earl of Leicester, and grant by him to Wm. Newce and Robt. Kitchen, of Bristol of the “custom, subsidy, and impost of all Spanish wines brought into “the ports of Bristol. (E 134/40Eliz/Hil5).

Copy deed of settlement. (1) Mayor and commonalty of Bristol. (2) Mayor,Aldermen and citizens of Bath. (3) Abel Kitchen and John Rowberowe, merchants, exors of will of Robert Kitchen, decd. Of annuity of £32 and sum of £400, to be laid out in several sums for charitable purposes within each of the 17 parishes. 27 March 1630. (P/St.Aug/Ch/2).

Doynton deeds. Moiety of manor of Doynton and property in Doynton, Southwood, Dyrham, Cold Ashton, Bitton, Wick & Abson and Pucklechurch: feoffment from Abell Kitchen of Bristol, merchant, to John Guy of the same, merchant. (DD\GL/86. 1614).
Mess. and farm, approx. 80a., partitioned between Abell Kitchen and John Guy, both of Bristol, merchants, being tenants in common, 1626. (DD\GL/89).

Leases and counterparts, mostly for terms of 99 years on lives, concerning various premises including messuage, grist mill and tucking mill, 1598; wood grounds formerly part of Lordswood (3 docts.) 1602-1623; messuage late Murford’s, 1626, and capital messuage and farm, 1632. Lessors are: Arthur Player of Siston, gent. 1598; John Jones the elder and younger of Marshfield, 1602; John Guy of Bristol, merchant, 1608-1638; Christopher Mills als. Butler of Doynton, yeo., 1614; Abell Kitchen of Bristol, merchant, 1614-1626; Michael Meredith of Marshfield, gent., 1627, and John Langton of Bristol, alderman, 1633-1649. (DD\GL/153).

PROB 11/183/731. Will of Abell Kitchen, Merchant of Bristol, Gloucestershire. 26 August 1640. Admin. to son John Kitchin.

PROB 11/228/2. Will of Robert Kitchen, Merchant of Bristol, Gloucestershire. 4 May 1653.

Covenant to levy a fine between John Carpenter and wife Elizabeth, Thomas Iles and wife Dorothy and Sarah Kitchen, spinster (daughters of Robert Kitchen descd and co-heirs of Mary, dau. of Abel Kitchen descd) to Samuel Franckome, Richard Davis al. Taylor and Thomas Tucker : messuage called the Splotts, situated under Toghill at Doynton, with lands. 2 January 1654. (HA/D/295).

In Virginia: John Harris, to wife sarah … to daughter Mary. Prob. 15 June 1720. Wit: John Kitchen, Robt. Ruffin. (B. 7, p. 523).

John Kitchen, son Benjamin, wife Sarah. Wit. John Edwards, Robert Ruffin.
15 June 1720

William Pitt was married to Mary Owen, sister of Robert Owen “of the city of Bristol, merchant, now bound on a voyage into the parts beyond the seas”, his Will proved 16 February 1615. “To wife Mary four hundred pounds and the messuage wherein I now dwell situate upon the “Kaye” within the said city … and after her decease I give the said messuage to my son Robert Owen. I give my said son all my lands, messuages &c. in Bristol and in Portbury, Somerset, or elsewhere … My brother Griffeth Owen My brother George Owen … to pay his brother and sisters at the town of Carmarthen. Wife Mary and son Robert to be executors and loving cousin Rice Davies Esquire* and loving brother in law William Pitt, merchant, and good friend William Baldwyn, brewer, to be overseers”. Cope, 8. *As given heretofore, he was a kinsman of Thomas Hodges, Esquire, of Wedmore, Somerset; his family’s tenants being the Council family.

Defendants: Robert Owen, James Owen, Thomas Wall gent, Mary Wall his wife, Thomas Woodward and Walter Holbrooke. Subject: Settlement of the will of Robert Owen merchant, of Bristol, Gloucestershire, deceased, payment of legacies and the possession of certain messuages: mentions John Harris, Mary Davis (alias Mary Owen) wife of Richard Davis and William Pitt merchant, of Bristol, Gloucestershire: property in Portbury, Somerset and the Quay, Bristol, Gloucestershire.

The ancestry of Bartholomew Owen may have to be reconsidered.

Edward Batten of Bristol gentleman, Will proved 16 November 1638. The poor of Temple parish in Bristol. Wife Mary Batten. My three tankards which I bought of my cousin Pitt I give to my three grandchildren and godsons Edward Hobbs, son of Thomas Hobbs, My son in law Mr Thomas Hobbes I appoint executor and do desire my cousin Mr Edward Pitt* and Mr Richard Meredith, vicar of Stogarsey, to be the overseers, dated 16 September 1638. Lee, 156. *Son of John Pitt, brother of William Pitt, aforementioned. The earliest records I can find of this Hobbes family is of Robert Hobbes marrying Elizabeth Jones, 15 October 1580, and Thomas Hobbes marrying Mary Batten, 10 September 1620, Temple Church, Bristol. A John Harris married Jane Hobbes in 1624, same venue.

Sarah Nethway of Bristol, widow of Thomas Nethway merchant deceased, her will proved 18 June 1641. My brother in law William Holman. Certain friends and servants and poor householders. Whereas my brother in law Mr Edward Pitt, now one of the Sheriffs of the said city of Bristol.

John Seward held land on the Blackwater, where Thomas Harris, who died in 1688, settled: 27 April 1686, Matthew Tomlin 1227 acres, lower par. Isle of Wight co. on borders of Blackwater, 781 acres being part of 1200 acres granted to Mr. John Seward 16 April 1648l 448 acres being waste adj.; beg. at a br. dividing land of John Turner and his daughter Marie’s, by William Westray, adj. Mary Turner, and Thomas Harris, to the bottom of Pig Neck; transp. of 9 persons. (B 7, p. 510).

Mathew Tomlin sells to John Johnson 225 ac. called “Pigneck”, 13 August 1687. Witness, John Davis.

James Pyland married the widow of Thomas Greenwood. She next married Thomas Edwards, who claimed Greenwood’s land, and sold 150 acres of it to John Jennings (overseer of the Will of Thomas Harris, d. 1672). 4 March 1674. Witness, John Davis. Thomas Greenwood, 150 acres July 28, 1641. Upon a branch of Seward’s Creek adj. John Seaward and John Upton.* Due for his own per. adv. and for trans. of Mary, his wife and Dorothy Greenwood. *His headright was Christopher Lewis, associate of Bartholomew Owen. John Upton, 3289 acres, 10 July 1643. Lying upon the branches of Pagan Point Creek and New Town Haven adj. Mr. Sparkes, Anthony Jones, Mr. Nevill, Robert Pitt, Mr. Seward, Ambrose Bennett and Mr. Moone. 139 acres for trans. 3 pers. and the remainder by several former pats. Robert Byrd, 150 acres 4 March 1646. Upon a branch of the lower bay called Sewards Cr. beg. at mouth of Goose Hill Cr., Hugh Winn and John Seward. Formerly granted to William Yarrett and by him and Hugh Wynn assigned to Byrd 20 October 1641.

Jennings, John: Leg.-son John; daughter Martha; daughter Mary my land on Lyon’s Creek; Daughter Sarah the land bought of Valentine Chitty; son-in-law William Seward; George Seward, wife Mary. (children under 17); Overseers, Capt. Edmund Wickins, Lt. George Moore, Thomas Moore, William Seward. Date. Oct. 19, 1678. Wit: George Lewer, Mathew Wood. Security was provided by Robert Flake and George Moore.

George Moore (brother of Thomas Moore), m. Jane Barcroft, da. of Charles Barcroft, a London vintner. George Moore (son of John Moore, mariner and merchant of Bristol), stated to be “age 78 years” when he made his will in 1710 (Chapman, IOW Wills, p. 54).

Sister to George and Thomas was Katherine Moore, who married (2) Robert Flake, a tobacco factor for Bristol merchants. Robert Flake and Samuel Eldridge, 560 acres, 20 August 1650. Lying upon the third swamp from Henry White’s plantation, due for trans. 11 pers. Christopher Lewis, 750 acres, 26 July 1652. About a mile to the Swd. of Henry White’s plantation at the Blackwater for trans. of 15 pers. Francis England, 946 acres, 26 July 1652. 746 by former pat. 20 June 1642 and 200 by assignment of a pat. from John White dated 4 July 1649.

By her first husband, she had issue:

Joyce, who married (1) Francis England, (2) George Cripps. Francis England, George Cripps. William Jennings of Bristol, surgeon, appts. Thomas Moore of Pagan Creek his atty. to collect from Arthur Skynner, Gyles Dryver (headright of Thomas Harris, d. 1672), and Joseph Whitson, and by virtue of a letter of atty. from John Hardiman of Bristol, taylor, to collect from William Hoodson in Nansemond. 29 June 1667. (Bodie, vol. 2, p. 550). Francis England was probably closely related to John England: Surrender of lease, John England of Bristol, merchant to John Seymour. (Bristol Archives, 8017/24. 20 April 1676). Edward Brantley, 30 October 1669, 675 acres adj. land of Mr. England and Mr. Tooke (associate of Thomas Harris, d. 1672).

George Moore had issue: Eleanor Moore, who married Richard Piland, the son of James Piland, bapt. on 30 August 1604, in St Mary’s Le Porte, Bristol, headright of Francis England, in 1642. In the Will of John Oliver, written 19 April 1652, he wrote, “I do appoint my loving friends James Piland and Robert Bird”. Ann Moore, who married Thomas White. The estates of Ann Moore and her husband Thomas White were appraised between 22 March 1741 and 26 July 1742 by Thomas Day, John Goodrich, and Edward Brantley. (Chapman, Wills, p. 142). Edward Brantley was security for the estate of Thomas Harris, d. 1672

HARRIS

1. William Harris, m. Dorothy Westbrooke, 31 Aug. 1562, in Wiveliscombe; kin of a family of Forte.
1.1. Richard Harris, m. (8 Oct. 1594), Eleanor Bennet, sister of (1) Thomas Bennett, who had issue: (1) Thomas Bennett, b. Nov. 11, 1603 at Wiveliscombe, father of Alice Bennett, who m. John Hardy. Nugent, C&P vol. 1, p. 569; their da., Lucy, m. Hodges Council; her sister m. Richard Jackson, their da., Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677. (2) Richard Bennett, bapt. 6 Aug. 1609, Governor of Virginia. (2) Edward Bennett.
1.1.1. William Harris, bapt. 28 Jan. 1595. He may have been the William Harris, headright of John Moone in IOW, in 1637 – the Fulgham connection.
1.1.2. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, in Wiveliscombe, Somerset, probably he who d. in Virginia in 1672. Thomas Harris was the cousin of Richard Bennett, whose first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife. Thomas Harris, Will recorded 13 Nov. 1672. Security: John Newman and Edward Brantley. Thomas Harris was also the nephew of Edward Bennett. Christopher Reynolds Sr. emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, “Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds Jr. all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan (his son-in-law who m. da. Elizabeth Reynolds) now liveth upon”.
1.1.2.1. John Harris. William Groves, appraisal by John Harris, Edward Brantley, Elias Fort and Edward Grantham; recorded 9 Feb. 1678. (B. 2, p. 172). John Harris m. a da. of Francis Hobbs, who sold Edward Brantley 675 ac. adj. Thomas Tuke, in 1669.
1.1.2.2. Thomas Harris, d. 1688. Probably he bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, in Cheddar (the domain of the Lancasters, who also held land in Wiveliscombe), ‘son of Thomas’. He placed his orphan son under the care of Hodges Council.
1.1.2.2.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1730: Thomas Harris 290 ac. IOW, on the Maherin River and both sides of Herbert’s Branch adj. Edward Brantley (son of Phillip and Joyce Lewis), and William Simmons line, 24 March 1725. Edward Brantley, John Thorpe, and Thomas Purcell appraisers.
1.1.3. Richard Harris.
1.1.3.1. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624; probably d. 1687, Virginia, m. Unity. He was the second-cousin of Richard Bennett, Governor of Virginia, whose first wife, Anne, was Charles Barham’s sister.
1.1.2.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of her 2nd husband, Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710.
1.1.4. Robert Harris. Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease.
1.1.4.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, Wedmore (juxta Cheddar), ‘son of Robert; he who may have died d. in 1677, in Virginia.

COUNSELL

1. John Cownsell, bapt. 1573.
1.1. John Cownsell, bapt 28 Nov. 1601, ‘f. Joannis Counsell’, m. Mary Coomer, 26 Nov 1631; the sister of Agnes Coomer, who m. John Harris in the adj. parish of Cheddar, 4. Feb. 1635. Their granddau. m. a member of the Hix family, stewards of the Lancasters. The vastly intertwined nature of family associations is evidenced through the Coomers. Mary and Agnes Coomer were daughters of a John Coomer, sisters of John Coomer, and aunt of his issue: John Coomer (father of another John), William Coomer Sr., Thomas Coomer, and Mary Coomer, who m. John Gardner, 24 Oct. 1664, in Cheddar; br. of Joel Gardner, father of Jane Gardner, who m. James Counsell, likely br. of Hodges Counsell, 12 Jun. 1682, in Cheddar. (See Presentments of churchwardens, etc. Cheddar (Peculiar, etc.). 1662-1701. Marriage Bond: James Counsell of Burrington, husbandman, and Jane Gardner, daughter of Joel Gardner of Cheddar. (S.H.C./ DD\SAS/C795/PR/150).
1.1.1. Richard Cownsell, bapt. 3 Sept. 1613 (Blackford vill. par. Wedmore), m. (1) Joan Taylor, 12 Aug. 1640, (2) Elizabeth Hix, 12 Aug. 1647, dau. of William Hix and Grace Morton, m. 23 Jan. 1625, and niece of Margaret Hix, who m. Simon Day, 14 Jan. 1632. Lease: Margery Hodges of Heathhouse, Wedmore, widow, to Richard Counsell of Wedmore, husbandman and Joan his wife. Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre. ref. 2667/1/36/2. 1648.
1.1.1.1. Hodges Council, the very likely son of Richard Council, by either his first or second wife. Richard Counsell was the br.-in-law of Susan Lancaster, and Hodges Counsell may have received his Christian name after her husband, William Hodges, a member of the very influential Hodges family, squires of Wedmore, who was probably his Godfather.
1.1.1.1.1. Hodges Council, inherited land on Blackwater. IOW, B 10, p. 205: John Council of Isle of Wight County and Province of Virginia sold to James Council of said county and his heirs forever, “my plantation whereon I now dwell only excepting my life in plantation” on Blackwater (River) 100 acres more or less joining Benjamin Darden and Samuel Vaughn. Part of “Patien” granted Hodges Council (the 2d) and by his will to his son John Councill and now by said John Councill to his son James Councill, to him & his heirs forever to have & hold. Sig. John Council. Wit. John Benteen, Nathan Council. Rec. 2 May 1756.
1.1.1.1.1.1. John Council, inherited from his father ‘the land I bought of Robert Lawrence’; likely the son of Philip Lawrence, who m. Joan Council, 20 Aug. 1618, Wedmore, the probable great- aunt of Hodges Council Sr. John Council d. bef. 1747, m. Josie Willis. John Council of Newport Parish to John Mackall of the same, 300 acres in Newport Parish (being land John Hardy of the lower parish willed to his dau. Lucy Council, who was the mother of the said John Council), on the southeast side of John Fulgram’s Swamp, adjoining William Westray and William Joyner. Wit. William Greene, Henry Pitt and John Council. Rec. 26 Feb. 1710.
1.1.1.1.1.2. Nathan Council. Richard Worrell and wife Patience to James Kitching, dated 8 Apr. 1756, 174 acres on the south side of the Blackwater Swamp adj. William Harris, Thomas Gray, and John Barnes. W: Joseph Denson, John Johnson, and Nathan Council. (Southampton Co., B. 2, 1753-1760, p. 97). William Harris to Nathan Council of IOW Co., dated 8 Apr. 1756, 100 acres adj. Bridgman Joyner Jr. S: William Harris, W: Jesse Jones, Sarah King, and James Kitchen. (ibid. pp. 97-98).
1.1.1.1.1.3. Hardy Council, d. 1750, m. Susannah Pope. Executor: son, Charles; Witnesses: Robert Johnson, Hardy Lawrence, and Jacob Dickinson. Hardy Council, Gent. to Richard Wooten and wife, Lucy Wooten, and their son, William Wooten, as consideation of a law suit over trepass, 500 acres on Beaver Dam Swamp. Wit: Barnaby Kearney, Christopher Reynolds, Hardy Council, John Pitt. (B. 4, p. 98. Rec. 22 Mar. 1730).
1.1.1.1.1.3.1. Mary Council, m. Phillip Brantley.

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FURTHER NOTICES OF THE CRISPINS

The Norman chroniclers were propagandists of elite families, each of which claimed descent from the Duchess Gunnora or her (suspiciously) numerous nieces. They treated tenure and lineage as equivalents when composing their accounts, so as to enhance the veracity of these claims, and promote the concept of a continuity of rule, which was the consequence of Divine Providence, and, thus, unchallengable. Their accounts owe as much to approximation as they do to fact. Where accounts are somewhat factual, they may be so by degrees – a great-niece may be designated as a niece, etc., such innacuracy being discerned by the test of chronology.

1. Harald/Aralt, proposed as synonomous with Harald of Bayeux, noted ally of Rollo’s family, who came to hold land between Bayeux and Coutances, and the person called on for assistance by Bernard the Dane when the Scandinavian colonists came under attack by Hugh the Great, duke of the Franks, in conjunction with King Louis IV. Professor Eleanor Searle (‘Facts and Patterns in heroic poetry’, 1984), wrote of the besieged colonists being reinforced by a new wave of Norsemen in the 960’s, and Richard (‘dux pyratorum’) took as a wife Gunnor, the daughter of one of their leaders, in a ‘peace-weaving’ marriage. Harald was the military commander of Bayeux (and not Harald Bluetooth), where Richard, “the Great Prince”, was fostered. Richard was imprisoned at Lâon by King Louis IV., and was rescued by a Danish band led by Osmund de centville, restoring his control of Normandy by 947. (John Haywood, Northmen, 2015).

“Le jeune Richard, enfermé à Laon, était exposé, si l’on en croit les historiens normands, aux plus grands dangers. Le roi de France voulait, disent-ils, lui faire brûler les jarrets, et, par cette mutilation, le rendre incapable d’occuper le trône ducal; mais les Normands qui l’entouraient, et principalement Osmond de Centville, parvinrent à le soustraire à la cruauté du roi, et lui assurèrent un asile à Senlis, près de son oncle maternel” (Adolphe Cheruel, Histoire de Rouen, vol. i. 1843).

As proposed by Benjamin T. Hudson (Viking Pirates and Christian Princes: Dynasty, Religion, and Empire, p. 67, 2005), Richard’s wife, Gunnora, may have been related to Harald. it is also possible that Harald was the father of Godfrey Haraldsson, whose son, Lagmann, was a military ally of Duke Richard II.

The Normans pressed for the marriage of Richard and Gunnor, ‘so that from a Danish father and a Danish mother may be bore the heir of this land, and will be its defender and advocate’ (Dudo, 4.125).

Possibly of Harald’s family:

1.1. Harfast. Brother of Gonnor, Duke Richard’s wife. Dudo of Saint-Quentin claimed she was of noble Danish origin, without specifying whether this was a paternal association. Herfast would have been granted land in Normandy by his brother-in-law, Duke Richard, a fief of which was named Crépon or Créspon (Albert Dauzat et Charles Rostaing, Dictionnaire étymologique des noms de lieux en France, 1963).

A clue to this family’s place of origin is given in the orthgography of Herfast; which is a form of Haerfest (OE), Herbist (OHG); Herfst (Dutch). These are Saxon terms meaning harvest, and are seen in the statements ‘god sumer’, ‘god harfest’. They represent a distinctly forms of harvest, being distinguishable from the Scandinavian forms Haust (ON), Hdst (OSw.); Host (OD). It is therefore likely that the family of Crépon were of some Saxon association.

1.1.1. Osborn de Crépon, married Emma, daughter of Raoul d’Ivri (Count Rodolph), uterine brother of Duke Richard I.* Guillaume of Jumièges records that Osborn’s sister married Osmund de Centville, their son being Foulques d’Anet. This Osmund is extremely unlikely to have been the rescuer of ‘Duke’ Richard; the usual genealogical ‘slight of hand’ being to make the first of a name the father of a namesake.

(*Guillaume de Jumièges records the marriage of Sprota (concubine of William Longsword, and mother of ‘Duke’ Richard) and “Asperleng”, who owned the mills in the valley of the Risle; they the parents of Raoul d’Ivri and Hugues, bishop of Bayeux, whose daughter, Aubree, married, firstly, Robert d’Ivry, and, secondly, Albert de Cravent. By her first huband, Aubree may have been the mother of Raoul de la Cunelle, stepson and inheritor of Albert de Cravent, vassal of the Crispins, of land at Tillieres, and of 30 acres at Damville. (La Cunelle, Eure, cant. de Damville, comm. de Buis-sur-Damville).

The parentages of Sprota and Asperleng are unknown.

Osborn de Crépon was also referred to as Osborn de Créspon: ‘Osbern de Créspon, gendre de Raoul comte d’Ivry, neveu de la feue duchesse Gonnor’ (Revue de Rouen et de Normandie, vol. 13, p. 268, 1845). This form of the name was also given to Gilbert Crispin; see André La Fresnaye, et al. Nouvelle histoire de Normandie, p. 110, 1814.

1.1.1.1. William FitzOsborn. In a charter concerning land at Guernanville, ‘Foulques the elder, tainted by corruption, lifted his heart (toward God) and withdrew to Ouche, where he assumed monk’s robes, and gave to St. Evroult the church of Guernanville and its tithes’. This donation was confirmed by Guillaume de Breteuil (William FitzOsborn’s son), Gilbert Crispin I. and his sons (Gibert Crispin II. and William Crispin I), in the presence of Roger de Clare; son of Richard FitzGilbert, son of Gilbert de Brionne, son of Godfrey, born c. 953), illigitimate son of Duke Richard, “the Great Prince”.

We see here that Count Rodolph’s son, Bishop Hugh, gave lands centred around Guernanville to William FitzOsborn, his nephew, and Gilbert Crispin the elder; their subtenant being Foulques de Guernanville. Gilbert Crispin and his sons were vassals of the ‘de Brionnes’, holding the border fortresses of Tillieres and Damville under their suzerainty. (It is quite possible that Gilbert Crispin was an illigitimate son of Gilbert de Brionne. The Norman elite’s very survival was entrusted to the Crispins; it would have been unthinkable not to give such a responsibility to kinsmen of the ducal family; although such a relationship may have been based solely through association with Count Rodolph).

The same grouping of Crispin, FitzOsborn, and Clare is seen in a legal dispute between them and Robert, Count of Meulan, who had been granted the castle of Brionne by Robert Curthose, and tried to claim the Abbey of Bec as part of this domesne. William Crispin, William de Breteuil, and Roger de Clare were vehemently opposed to this: ‘Tunc forte supervenerunt Willelmus Crispinus, et Willelmus de Britolio, et Rogerius de Benefacta, qui cum causam scissent, magna indignatione commoti, magnis vocibus et terribilibus juramentis protestati sunt, quicquid sui parentes ecclesiie Becci dederant, se auferre, si Comes Mellenti cenobium Beccense in suo dominio quoquo modo haberet’ (Notitia de Liberate Beccensis Monasterii, 1088-1090). I would suggest that they spoke as a familial group.

1.1.2. … de Crepon, m. Osmund de Centville. (This is not necessarily synonomous with Conteville).

1.1.2.1. Foulques d’Anet, from the vil of Anet, south of Ivry. (A probable relative was Robert d’Anet, vassal of the lords of Ivry, who held land at Brézolles, as the Crispin family.

1.1.2.1.1. Gunnora d’Anet, m. (I suggest) Gilbert Crispin I.,* which would answer M. Le Prevost’s statement that there was an apparent association between the Crispin and FitzOsborn family, without the basis of that association being known. ‘Nous ignorons à quel titre Gislebert Crespin etait appele à ratifier cette donation; mais nous supposons que ce pouvait être à raison de quelque alliance avec la famille d’Ivri, dont le souvenir est perdu (‘Ordericus Vitalis’, ed. le Prevost et. al., p. 398, 1840).

Gilbert Crispin, ‘who because of the shape of his hair was to be known as Crispin. For in his early youth he had hair that was brush-like and stiff and sticking out, and in a manner of speaking bristling like the needles of a pine tree. This gave him the name of Crispin, from ‘crispus pinus, ‘pine hair’. Gilbert Crispin I. was also noted by Milo Crispin as being ‘of renowned origin and nobility: And like the Fabii, or the Anicii or Manlii, carried the tokens of fame (insignia) among the Romans, so the Crispins knew even greater fame among the Normans and the French’ (How The Holy Virgin Appeared To William Crispin The Elder And On The Origin Of The Crispin Family, ed. Migne, cols. 735-744, 1856).

With regards to his epithet, the Normans often combined various naming elements, in this case, the toponym Crépon is punned with a matching physical characteristic; an early form of a word game.

1.1.2.2. Albreda d’Anet. (It is not known whom she married). Foulques d’Anet and his sister Albreda were among the early benefactors to the abbey of Bec-Hellouin “Ex dono Fulconis de Aneto et homimim suorum manerium de Mesnillo Simonis cum ecclesia et omnibus ecclesiae et manerii pertinentiis. Ex dono Albredae sororis ejusdem Fulconis assensu et voluntate ipsius terram de A.d. 1047. Groselers quae est juxta landam sita cum omnibus pertinentis suis’. La collection des Mémoires des Antiquaires de Normandie contient (tome XVI, 2e partie, page 287) le détail des revenus que le fief d’Anet versait dans les caisses du Roi, vers l’année 1204.

A fief of Anet was Marcilly: Ces revenus provenaient des eaux et forêts, des moulins, des pressoirs, des fours, du blé, de l’avoine, d’œufs de Pâques; ils se soldaient en livres et sous, et en mesures. Au nombre des arrière-fiefs qui relevaient d’Anet étaient les villages de Marcilly, Saussay et Marchefroi. (Pierre Désiré Roussel, Rodolphe Pfnor Histoire et description du château d’Anet, p. 2, 1875).

The suzerainty of Marcilly was entwined with that of Brezolles:

Croth vient de Crota, issu lui-même de l’anglo-saxon, Crust ou Crot, qui signifie un enclos. Primitivement Croth était une dépendance de la terre de Sorel, qui avait pour seigneur au xi° siècle, Ingulfe Ribault, puissant baron, originaire de Dreux, qui possédait à la fois Brezolles, Remalard, Thimer, etc. Son nom figure en 1028 au las d’une chartre du roi Robert et d’une autre de Henri 1er.

Il eut pour fils aîné, Albert, cité par Ordéric Vital, mais Sorel et Croth échurent à Guazzon ou Gaston, son second fils, marie à Frodeline. 11 fonda dans son domaine de Thimer une forteresse nommée le Chàteauneuf qui est devenue une ville importante; lui-même prit le nom de Guazzon du Chastel qui a passé à ses descendants.

En 1060, du consentement de sa femme et de ses trois fils Hugues, Gauzbert et Guazzon du Chaste! donna aux religieux de Marmoutiers, l’église de Croth avec les habitants, les vignes, les prés, les moulins, les pêcheries, etc. Hugues Bardon, seigneur suzerain donne son assentiment à la donation.

A coté des seigneurs do Sorel, il existait à Croth d’autres seigneurs moins importants qui portaient le nom de ce fief. On trouve, eu 1062, dans le cartulaire de Chartres, Arnold de Croth et de Richard son frère.

Vers 10S0, l’abbaye de Saint-Père acheta sans doute des moines de Marmoutiers, l’église de Croth, sise au Haut-Croth, in Croto superiori.

On a vu plus haut, que Guazzon du Chastel avait un fils aine, nommé Hugues, qui s’est rendu célèbre dans l’histoire, sous le nom de Hugues de Chàteauneuf. Ce guerrier fut présent en 1066, à la restitution des Authieux que fit Richard fils d’Hellouin le-Sénechal, en présence du duc Guillaume. Là se trouvait également présent Roger de Montgomery, dont Hugues épousa la fille en 1073. Cinq ans plus tard, il prit le parti du duc Robert Courte-Heuse coiitrele roi Guillaumo, son père, et reçut les révoltes dans ses châteaux de Remalard, Châteauneuf et Sorel. Pour le punir, Guillaume lui enleva Remalard. Il n’eut que deux filles, Mathilde, l’aînée, fut la première prieure de Bellomet, près La Loupe, que son père avait fait bâtir pour elle. Mathilde , sa sœur, épousa Gervais qui hérita de Sorel, de Chateauneuf, de Dreux, etc.

En 1092, Gervais de Chàteauneuf fit la paix à Bréval, entre Guillaume de Breteuil et Goel, seigneur d’Ivry. Ce seigneur, en 1104, à la suite d’un échange fait avec l’abbé de Saint-Père, lui céda ladirne des Essarts do la foret de Croth.

En 1107, Gautier de Croth fut témoin dans une charte de Foulques de Marcilly (the second of that name) pour Saint-Père de Chartres. On trouve encore dans le cartulaire de saint Père, un Payen de Croth, parent du premier.

Gervais de Chàteauneuf, sénéchal du roi de France, Philippe I, faisait des courses sur les terres de Normandie: pour se délivrer de ce voisin incommode, Henri I” fit bâtir les forts de Nonancourt, d’Illiers, puis il enleva à Gervais son château de Sorel. Croth dut alors rester quelques années entre les mains du roi d’Angleterre.

Hugues II, fils de Gervais, reçut la garde do l’Aigle que lui confia Louis VI en 1118; plus tard, il se révolta contre Henri Ier, en 1122, et essaya de ravitailler Wateville en 1124; fait prisonnier à la journéede Bourgthoroulde, il fut captif en Angleterre, puis délivré. Il avait épousé Amicie, une des filles de Galéran de Meulan. En 1132, il guerroyait avec Roger de Tosny, contre Guillaume Mauvoisin, seigneur de Rosny. (A cousin of the Crispin family).

Hugues autorisa la donation de Panlatte, faite à l’abbaye du Bec, il donna à celle de l’Estrée le mort-bois de sa forêt de Croth, enfin, il mourut vers 1140, laissant un fils du môme nom que lui.

En 1144, les évoques d’Evrcuxct de Chartres confirmèrent à l’Estrée le droit de prendre du bois mort dans la forêt de Croth. Vingt ans plus tard, le pape Alexandre III confirma les droits dos religieux de l’Estrée dans le bois de Croth.

Hugues III de Chàteauneuf eut, en 1152, une guerre à soutenir contre Gilbert de Tillières (Gilbert Crispin IV., whose family were enfeoffed in Brezolles) et le duc do Normandie qui brûla le bourg de Brezolles (1). Hugues est cité en 1181 au nombre des chevaliers du Perche portant bannière.

On voit dans un acte de 1185, que les moines de Marmoutiers avaient conservé leur prieuré de Croth, différent de l’église achetée par les moines de Saint-Père, et que les seigneurs d’Anet avaient aussi des droits à Croth. (Dictionnaire historique, vol. i., 1868).

1.1.2.2.1. Foulques de Marcilly.

1.1.2.2.1.1. Foulques de Marcilly, heretofore given.

1.1.2.2.2. Roger de Ivry.

1.1.2.2.3. Hugh de Ivry. Mr. Stapleton (Historical memoirs of the house of Vernon, p. 32, 1856), makes a case for Albreda being the mother of (1) Roger de Ivry, the ‘Conqueror’s’ butler, and the founder of a monastery in honour of the Virgin Mary, in the vicinity of his castle of Ivry. His wife was Adelina, daughter of Hugh de Grandmesnil. (2) Hugh of Ivry, also butler of the ‘Conqueror’. ‘Alberada Hugonis et Rogerii mater, dedit, annuentibus ipsis, hoc quod habebat in ecclesia et decima de Hainolvilla (Henouville-en-Caux) et unam acram terrae in eadem villa pro anima sua. Hugo Pincerna supradictae’ (Charter of confirmation for the Abbey of the Holy Trinity of Caen).

1.1.2.2.4. Robert d’Ivry. “Robert d’lvry ended his days in the abbey of Bec, leaving three sons, Ascelin Goel, and William, “milites insignes”, and Robert, in holy orders. The eldest of these succeeded to his father’s patrimony, and built thereon the castle of Bréval ; his wife, Isabella; was daughter of William of Breteuil, who had obtained from Duke Robert and from Roger de Beaumont, (to whom the chatellenie had been given after the exile of Roger Pincerna, and who was now indemnified with the castle Of Brionne in exchange) the cession of the Honour of Ivry, which he claimed in right of his descent from Count Ralph, uterine brother of Richard 1, Duke of Normandy. After the death of William, King Henry I retained the castle of Ivry in his own hands for a time, but about the year 1119 he restored the wardship to Robert Goél, son of Ascelin Goel and Isabel de Breteuil. Of this marriage there was issue, seven sons and a daughter, the wife of Ralph Le Roux. The names of three sons have been preserved ; Robert Goél above-mentioned; William Lovel surnamed Lovel (Lupellus) his next brother, who after the death of °f Iv’y’ Robert acquired the castle of Ivry and the whole patrimony; and Roger, surnamed the Stammerer (Balbus) who was lord of the castle at Grossoeuvre (Grandis-silna) in the diocese of Evreuxfs captured by King Stephen in the year 1137. The wife of WVilliam Lovel was a sister of Waleran, Comte of Meulan, and by her it is presumed he had a son Waleran, who in 1172 made this return to the King’s precept for recognition of service”. (Mr. Stapleton, ibid.).

1. Raoul d’Ivry (Count Rodolph), uterine brother of ‘Duke’ Richard I.
1.1. Emma d’Ivry, m. Harfast de Crépon.
1.1.1. Osborn de Crépon.
1.1.1.1. William FitzOsborn.
1.1.1.1.1. William de Breteuil. “I, William de Breteuil, son of Count William, do give and grant to St. Evroult and his monks, out of the tolls of Glos, one hundred shillings yearly to buy fish at the beginning of Lent, for the repose of the souls of my father and mother, and that of my own; and that their anniversaries and my own may be observed by all the monks as a feast; and that on each of our anniversaries, a portion of meat and drink equal to a monk’s share be given to the poor. During my life also a mass of the Holy Trinity is to be sung for me in the abbey every Sunday. I also grant to the monks one burgess in Breteuil, and whatever my mesne-tenants, Richard Fresnel, William Halis, and Ralph de La Cunelle, and others, have granted to them I also give and confirm. All this I grant by these presents, and I faithfully promise them hereafter my counsel and aid and other privileges. Whoever, after my death, shall take away or diminish the things granted, let him be accursed.” This charter was ratified and witnessed by the signatures of William de Breteuil himself, Ralph his chaplain, William the steward, son of Barno, Arnold, son of Arnold, and Robert de Louviers”.
1.1.2. … de Crepon, m. Osmund de Centville.
1.1.2.1. Foulques d’Anet.
1.1.2.1.1. Gunnora d’Anet, m. (I suggest) Gilbert Crispin I, kinsman of the FitzOsborns.
1.1.2.1.1.1. Gilbert Crispin. When Gilbert Crispin II. donated land in Tillieres, he did so in the presence of Giroie de Echauffour, who was a vassal of the Crispins at Reville. Between 1049-1050, William, son of Giroie, donated the tithes of Calavilla to Bec., the gift being confirmed by Hugh and Robert Grandmesnil, his nephews (Faroux, 122). The place from which the Crispins assumed a name (Colville) is a matter of choice; some suggesting that it was from Fresne-Cauverville, Eure, canton Cormeilles, in that William de Echauffour held land in Lievin, 5 miles from Fresne-Cauverville.
1.2. Hugues, bishop of Bayeux.
1.2.1. Aubree, m. 1. Robert d’Ivry.
1.2.1.1. Raoul de la Cunelle (‘Rodulfus de Cunella‘); ‘d’Ivry’ kinsman of the Crispins.

From a similarity of names, Fulk d’Anet has been confounded constantly with Fulk d’Aunou.

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THE CRISPINS

La charte dont on va lire un extrait indiquera les rapports qui existaient entre différents membres de la famille des Crespins dont parle Robert de Torigni.

‘Ego Goscelinus Crispinus … confirmavi Deo et sancte Marie Becci … omnes donationes quas antecessores mei et homines eorum eis fecerunt… scilicet ex dono primi Willelmi Crispini, eclesias de Blangeio…. ecclesiam de Livarot … in Strapigneio decimam denariorum burgi … Ex dono Eve*, uxoris ejusdem Willelmi … Ex dono Willelmi Crispini secundi, fllii dicti Willelmi et Eve in Burnevilla medietatem ecclesie et decime et patronatus…. Ex dono Willelmo Crispini tertii, fllii dicti Willelmi et Agnetis … Hec omnia que scripta sunt ego Goscelinus Crispinus, Beccum venions, cum Willelmo filio meo adhuc puero, diclis monachis in liberam et perpetuam elemosinam concessi, assensu et volunlate dicti Willelmi fllii mei … anno ab incarnations’. Domini MCLV. (Bibl. nat. ms. latin 13905, fol. 19 V).

1. Gilbert Crispin.
1.1. Gilbert Crispin.
1.2. William Crispin, m. Eve de Montfort, ‘who suited him well on account of her origin and manners. Eve de Montfort bore him Gilbert, abbot of Westminster, William Crispin II., and many others’. (Milo Crispin). She was the sister of Norman frontier lord Simon de Montfort. (W. Frolich, trsl., The Letters of Anselme of Canterbury, 1990-1994, nos. 22, 98, 118, and 147). They were the children of Amauri 1 de Montfort and Bertrade de Gometz. Amauri 1 de Montfort was the possible son of William de Hainault. (Marjorie Chibnall, ed. & trans., The Ecclesiastical History of Orderic Vitalis, vol. iv., 1969-80). Eve de Montfort’s niece, Bertrade de Montfort, daughter of Simon de Montfort and Agnes d’Evreux, William Crispin’s second cousin, married Fulke d’Anjou IV., Count of Anjou, they beingthe great-granparents of King Henry II of England. (Vernon M. Norr, compiler, Some Early English Pedigrees, 1958-1968).
1.2.1. William Crispin was an Anglo-Norman lord who held land in Wetherby, Wheldrake, Coxwold, and Goodmanham in Yorkshire, and in Ancroft in Northumberland, as mesne-tenant of William de Percy.  He also held other land in Yorkshire: in Arnodestorp, Burnby, Clifton, Dunnington, Easthorpe in Londesborough, Elvington, Fyling, Grimston in Dunnington, Hayton, Hinderwell, Ianulfestrop, Kirkleatham, Kipling, Marshe-by-the-Sea, Nafferton, Pockthorpe, Scoreby, Sutton upon Derwent, and Warter. (Domesday Book, folio 322v).  He also held land in Normandy: ‘William Crispin the younger gave the tithe of the mill and of his desmene which he had in Le Mesnil-Hubert, the church and tithe of Druicort, what Robert Malcovernant held of him, one house in Livarot with all its customs, half of the church and tithe of Bournainville’ (David Bates, ed., Regum Anglo-Normannorum, the Acta of William I, 1066-1087, 1998). According to Mathieu – Reserches Sur Les Premiers Comtes De Dammartin, 19, 60, 1996. – a probable wife of William Crispin 11. was Agnes Mauvoisin, who was the daughter of Eustachia Dammartin, the daughter of Manasser, Count of Dammartin, and Constance Capetien, daughter of Robert II., King of France. She married Raoul Mauvoisin, Seigneur of Rosny, and Viscount of Mantes. He was a part of the Hastings invasion force, before becoming a monk at Gassicourt, dying in 1074. An act of Agnes, daughter of Eustachia, daughter of Count Manasser, granted tithes at Rosny ‘for the souls of her mother and husband, William.’ The association of Rosny and the name Manasser strongly suggests a connection with the Mauvoisins of Rosny. The Mauvoisins were the most powerful family in the marches of Francia, between Vernon and Mantes.
1.2.1.1. ‘Willelmo Crispini tertii’.

1. Richard, ‘the Great Prince’.
1.1. Count Godfrey, born circa 953, to a concubine.
1.1. Gilbert de Brionne.
1.1.1. Richard FitzGilbert
1.1.2. Gilbert Crispin, held Tillieres as a vassal of Gilbert de Brionne.
1.1.2.1. Gilbert crispin, held Damville as a vassal of Richard FitzGilbert.
1.1.2.1.1. Gilbert Crispin III., m. Hersende de Brezolles, kinswoman of Albert Ribaut, and became enfeoffed in Armentières-sur-Avre.
1.1.2.1.1. Robert de d’Armentières, held Whatton of Gilbert de Gand. Of approximately 9,500 estates listed in Domesday, 760 of them had tenants in chief from the ‘southern Low Countries’ – ony two Flemish tenants-in-chief were from northern, ‘Flemish’ Flanders: the Abbey of St. Peters in Ghent, and Gilbert de Ghent, of the family of the advocates of St. Peter’s'(Eljas Oksanen, Flanders and the Anglo-Norman World, pp. 186-8, 2012). Armentières is a town in the southern Low Countries. There is no geographical, tenurial, or ecclesiatical record of any connection between the Gand family and this Armentières. If the Crispins descended from Richard, ‘the Great Prince’, and Robert de d’Armentières was of the Crispin family of Armentières-sur-Avre, then his relationship to Gilbert de Gand was one of kinship, the same basis on which the ducal family entrusted the Crispins with the defence of the Norman borders. The military prowess of the Crispins was well esteemed: ‘And like the Fabii, or the Anicii or Manlii, carried the tokens of fame [insignia] among the Romans, so the Crispins knew even greater fame among the Normans and the French’ (Milo Crispin).

1.1.2.2.1. William Crispin, m. Agnes Mauvoisin.
1.2. Richard II.
1.2.1. Eleanor, m. Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, whose first wife Otgiva was a sister of Giselle, who was probably the mother of Gilbert de Gand.

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THE ORIGINS OF GILBERT CRISPIN

Gilbert Crispin I came from Livarot or Blangy, near Lisieux, where the Crispins had
large tracts of land. Livarot was a ducal domain, and was fortified from the time when the Mont-Gomeri built their castle.

Its main fiefs were Pont-Aleri, Cheffreville (Chevreville), near Notre Dame-de-Courson, within which was Bellau, held by the Paynels in the 12th century; Les Loges, Lisores (Lizours), Moutiers-Hubert (from whence the Paynels), and Tonancourt.

The Markham family were originally of the family of de Lizours. Roger de Lizours was a mesne-tenant of the great Norman magnate Roger de Busli, and was probably in some way related to him, witnessing many of his charters, and holding land of him in East Markham.

Roger was probably a member of the family of Chevreville, which held land in in Neufchatel-en-Bray, and perhaps a son of ‘Turold de Quievreville’, who signed a charter of Sanct. Trin., circa 1040-1060, as ‘Turoldi de Drincourt’; Drincourt being 3 miles from Busli.

Roger’s son was Fulc de Lizours, 1.e. Fulke de Chevercourt, ‘man of Roger de Busli’.

Roger de Busli founded the Priory of Blithe in 1088, witnesses being: Turoldus de Cheverchort, Fulk de Lisoriis,Thoraldus frater ejus, and Walter de Drincourt.

Roger de Busli took his surname from Bully, near Neufchatel-en-Bray
(Thor. Soc. v. 44-6 p. 15, 1941). His sister Beatrix, married Robert, Earl of Eu.

A charter of 1110 states that Fulc ‘gave to the monastery of St. Mary of Blithe and the monks there a toft’.

He assumed the name of his place of residence, calling himself Fulc de Marcham.

Markam is near Tuxford.

His son was Alexander de Marcham, Castellan of Nottingham Castle, whose son, William Markham,inherited the estates of his father, and married the heiress Cecilia de Lexington, one of six children of Richard de Lexington,
and Matilda de Cauz.

Their son, Robert Markham, married Sarah de Snitterton, heiress of Jordan de Snitterton, in the county of Derby. Their daughter, Bertha Markham, married William de Longvilliers, 1250-1281, Lord of Gargrave, date as inquis.
post mortem.

The Longvilliers acquired a third part of Tuxford by this marriage with Bertha Markham, who had inherited it from her grandmother. William de Longvilliers and Bertha Markham had issue, among which were: Ellota de Longvilliers, who married Richard de Stanhope (Crispin/Colville).

There followed many marriages between the Stanhopes and Markhams.

Mr. Stapleton, Mag. Rot. – ‘In 1195, among those newly indebted we may notice Hugh de Montfort in 70 li. for his pledge as mainpernor for the Constable, and in 20 li. of the issue of Livarot, and in 66 li. 5s. of the issue of Blangy, and in one hauberk and three loriculc e due as a render from the inhabitants of Blangy, and William de Mara
in 17 li. 3s. of the residue of the Tallage of 12d. set in the fief of Montfort’.

Gilbert Crispin 1. was given (under the vassalage of the comtes de Brionne, n.b.) the border fortress of Tillieres. In addition he was given the fortress of Damville, which the Crispins held under Richard FitzGilbert, son of Gilbert de Brionne,  son of Godfrey, illigitimate son of  Duke Richard, “the Great Prince”.

These were extremely important commissions, on which the safety of the Norman regime depended. It was invariably the custom that such duties were given to those somehow related to the ducal family.

The most likely explanation would be for Richard FitzGilbert and Gilbert Crispin 1 to be half-brothers; Gilbert being an illigitimate son.

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THOMAS HAYNE OF VIRGINIA

We can know much of the Hayne family of Devon and Virginia, at the same time as knowing little of importance. That is, although it is possible to chart ‘who begat who’, the substance of their life – their everyday actions, motivations, and hopes – remain largely hidden. It is possible to construct aspects of their life from the works of social historians, and gain insight into the hardships faced by Devonshire seafaring families in the 15th and 16th centuries. By and large, many of those briefly mentioned hereinafter were of a landed class that invested their profits in shipbuilding and seafaring merchant trade, largely out of Plymouth, which greatly expanded with the colonisation of Virginia.

The brief account that follows does not describe the complexity of intermarriages that occurred between members of this kinship group, between that of Yeo and Harris, and Hamlyn and Harris, etc., or their shared tenurial connections of centuries standing. An expanded account would give more insight into the ” family collectives” that colonised virginia, yet such a truth runs counter to the Hollywood notion of colonisation through individual effort, and most would rather receive a version of “popcorn history” at the cinema.

I have included a brief footnote of the ancestry of Dousabella Harris (of Hayne) and her husband, John Beare, as their “circle” found their way to Virginia.

Hayne, (Devon) ar. a chev. gu. betw. three martlets sa.

WIlliam Holand of Weare in the county of Devon. Arms — Quarterly, of eight pieces: 1. Azure, semee de lis a lion rampant gardant Argent; 2. Gules, ten torteaux, two, three, two, two, and one, a canton Ermine; 3. Quarterly, Or and Gules, four escallops counterchanged ; 4. Azure, three bendlets Argent; 5. Ermine, a bend Gules; 6. Gules, a chevron Argent, between three plates ; 7. Gules, a fess nebuly Argent; 8. Gules, a chevron between three martlets Argent. Thus, the Hollands of Weare had intermarried with a Heiress whose family bore the Arms (differenced) of the Hayne family, which were also those of the Sanfords: ar. a chevron between three martlets sa.

1. Walter Hayne, born c. 1410. Quit Claim Thomas, son of John Beaumont to John Waylock and Margery his wife. Lands: tenement and garden in Pilton, between land of Walter Hayne of S. and land of John … on the N. and Podyngdon meadow on E and the road on the S. Wits: Walter Hayne, John Chive, John Colt, Hugh Geffrey, Thomas Colson. 9 Nov. 1442. (North Devon Record Office (N.D.R.) 1239 F/T 3). Feoffment: Lands and tenements in Barnstaple. Henry Hunte, s. and h. of John, to John Holand, Rector of Heanton (illigitimate half-brother of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter) and Walter Hayne merchant. (N.D.R, B1/496. c. 1450). Charter: Robert Haywode and Richard Holemore. To the brothers and lepers of St. Margaret’s Hospital, Pilton. A tenement and adjacent garden in Pilton, in Smythynstrete: the tenement of Barnstaple Long Bridge to the east, that formerly of Walter Hayne to the west and the king’s highway to the south; to pray for the souls of Walter, his wife Joanna and their children, parents, benefactors and all of the faithful dead. (N.D.R., B1/4925. February 20, 1461). Pilton is in Barnstaple.
1.1. Thomas Hayne. Wytheman v Hayne. Plaintiffs: William Wytheman. Defendants: Thomas Hayne. Subject: Detention of deeds relating to land in Fremyngham. Devon. (National Archives (N.A.), C 1/175/59 1486-1493). From Fremington to Pilton is 4 miles. The Harris family held land in Pilton to at least 1693.
1.2. John Hayne. Hayn v Brase. Plaintiffs: John Hayn, son of Joan Hayn, deceased. Defendants: Phelype Brase and John Laplod. Subject: Detention of deeds relating to messuages and lands at Woddhouse in Sidbury. Devon. (N.A., C 1/141/66. 1486-1493).
1.3. William Hayne.
1.3.1. Edward Hayne.
1.3.2. Walter Hayne. Hayn v Hayn. Plaintiffs: Walter, son of William Hayn, of Bratton. Defendants: Robert Hayn. Subject: Detention of deeds relating to land in Stowford. Devon. (N.A., C 1/205/60. 1493-1500). Hayne v Hayne. Plaintiffs: Edward, son of William Hayne. Defendants: Walter Hayne, brother of complainant. Subject: Portion of corn and other goods due to complainant according to the custom of the hundred of Lyfton Frankelyn, by which the residue of a deceased man’s goods, after debts and legacies paid, were divided equally between executors for the health of his soul, his widow and his children, or, the wife not surviving, between executors and children. Devon. (N.A., C 1/205/92. 1493-1500).
1.3.2.1. Walter Hayne. Robert Hamlyn of Devon v William Gregory, Walter Hayne and Richard Meryfelde: a messuage and lands in Sprytown [in Stowford], Devon. (N.D.R., REQ 2/6/40. 1492 and 1547). This family of Hamlyn intermarried with a junior (Marwood) branch of the Harris of Hayne.
1.3.3.1.1. Walter Hayne, Esq.
1.3.3.1.1.1. Thomasine Hayne, married William Harris, died by January 12, 1547 (‘Captain Billy’), about whom ‘Jamaica Inn’ was written).
1.3.3.1.1.1.1. John Harris of Hayne, died 1551, of Ottery St. Mary, married Elizabeth Kelly, fl. 1551.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1. William Harris of Hayne, died February 23, 1591, married Mary Greville, daughter of Sir Fulk Greville of Beauchamp’s Court.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1. Arthur Harris of Hayne and Kenegie (died 1628) married Margaret Davils, daughter of John Davils of Totely.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. William Harris, buried May 1661.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Christopher Harris of Hayne and Kenegie, died May 25, 1687.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.2. John Harris of Hayne & Kenegie (born cica 1596, died March 6, 1656.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.3. Joseph Harris.
1.3.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.3.1. Major John Harris, born circa 1640, of Saint Stephen’s Parish, Northumberland Co., will dated 20 September, 1718, mentions a legacy left by his uncle William Harris “of Hayne in parish of Stowford in County of Devon”.  In this construct, I have not followed the various guess works of  Mr. Vivian, and those who assign brothers to different generations on the sole basis that one died substantially before the other. It can also be noted that one brother may have married at the age of 23, another (probably for a second time) at the age of 46, adding to the confusion about generations.
1.3.3.1.2. David Hayne. David Hayne. Beare v Hayne. Plaintiffs: John Beare. Defendants: David Hayne. Subject: Land in Barnstaple late of Thomas Beare, deceased, father of complainant. Devon. (N.A., C 1/1174/38. 1544-1551). Bond by David Hayne to Robert Cade, Mayor, and to the Aldermen and Burgesses, for releasing and quit claiming all rights under the Manor of Barnstaple to the Castle Green, the Castle Bayley, and the Rack Haye. 12 January 1585. (Barnes, ‘Barnstaple records’, 1900. (Chalden v Chaldon. Plaintiffs: Alice Chalden, widow. Defendants: Miles Chaldon (her son). Subject: land in Pilton, Devon, agreed to be demised to the plaintiff, Alice Chalden, widow, and the defendant, Miles Chaldon (her son) by John Pinchard). (N.A., C 2/JasI/C3/30). 1603-1625.
1.3.3.1.2.1. William Hayne.
1.3.3.1.2.1.1. Thomas Hayne, bapt. March 4, 1540, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2. David Hayne, married, September 13, 1564, in Barnstaple, Julyan Cotten.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.1. Robert Hayne, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.2. Gilbert Hayne, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.3. William Hayne, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.4. Oliver Hayne, bapt. August 15, 1565, Barnstaple, married, February 25, 1612, at Plymouth, St. Andrews, Devon, Margaret Hitchens.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.4.1. Hugh Haynes.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.4.2. William Haynes.
1.3.3.1.2.2.2.4.3. Thomas Haynes, bapt. December 28, 1619. Thomas Hayne v James Yeo: money matters, Devon. (N.A., C 10/6/12. 1648). Thomas Haynes (died 1679), of Northumberland Co, bequeathed his brother, William Haynes, all his estate in houses, &c., in England, ” which may be known by my father’s will.” His will Rec. May 24, 1679, further bequested to son James Haynes my plantation. Daus. Elizabeth and Margarett Haynes land bought in partnership with Mr. Robt. Griggs upon a creek called Slaughters creek. My “nevie” Thomas Reave 5000 lbs. of tabacco. “Nevie” James Haynes who is also now in Va. Brothers James Haynes & his son. Wm. Haynes and his son Thos. Haynes all my estate in England after death of my sister Joan to whom I do give it for her life time, which came to me by my father’s will. Exors: Wife and children. Wits: John Molyne, Thos. Burroughs. (W.B. 5, p. 54). Lancaster Co, Court, March 9, 1697: James Haynes, William Jones, Thomas Gaskins, Thomas Pinkard, and Elizabeth Curtis comeing into Court and moveing for administration of their Mother, Elizabeth Pinkard’s, estate the same is therefore granted and itt is further ordered yt an Inventory of ye Estate be taken and returned upon Oath to ye next Court. Capt. William Jones married by 1681 Margaret Haynes, stepdaughter of John Pinckard and daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Haynes: Lancaster Court of September 14, 1681, “The difference depending att this Court between John Pinckard & Elizabeth his wife, Relicte of Mr. Thomas Haynes (deced) & William Jones as marrieing Margaret, Eldest Daughter of the sde Haynes (deced) is to be referred to the next Court.” Deed 1704, Sept. 20, Capt Wm Jones & Margaret his wife by her atty Wm Jones Jr., land to Robert Carter, Mr. Hancock Lee atty Robt Carter”.
1.3.3.1.3. Thomas Hayne.
1.3.3.1.3.1. Peter Hayne, bapt. November 28, 1578, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.3.2. John Hayne, bapt. February 11, 1581, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.3.3. Ezekiell Hayne, bapt. July 5, 1584, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.3.4. William Hayne, bapt. December 3, 1586, Barnstaple.
1.3.3.1.3.5. Thomas Hayne, bapt. April 6, 1589, Barnstaple.
Dousabella Harris is one of those from the distant past whose name, preserved on a grave-slab in St Olave’s, Hart Street, gives a nudge toward wanting to know more of her. She and her husband, John Beare, have been recorded in stark abstraction: ‘Nave. Floor slab: John Beare, merchant, died 29 Jul 1696 aged 77 and Dousabell (Dulcibella) née Harris his wife, died 2 June 1688 aged 77; married ca. 1654’. Burial Register: 1688 June 9: ‘Mrs. Dulcibella, wife of Mr John Beare, Mrch was buried in ye south side chauncell; 1696 Aug. 7 Mr John Beare buried in ye south chancell’ … Arms: (Argent), three bears’ heads erased (sable), muzzled (or) (Beare); impaling: (Sable), three crescents (argent) (Harris). Crest: A bear’s head erased (sable), muzzled (or). Such genealogical shorthand hides a wealth of information, hinted at by Strype in his ‘Worthies’, who commented that they ‘both descended from good Families in the County of Devon’, and he ‘had lived for 42 years at St Olave Hart Street’.

This should be enough to excite enquiry, for it is immediately obvious that Dousabell was of the Harris family of Hayne, whose members had strong connections to Virginia – ‘Sir Fulke Greville of Beauchamp’s Court, married (1526) Elizabeth Willoughby, b. Apr. 28, 1510, their daughter, Mary Geville, married William Harris of Hayne, Esq., Sept. 11, 1553, at St Dunstan In the West, London. She was the sister of Edward Greville, who married Jane Grey; their issue included (1) Frances Greville, who married (1) Nathaniel West (Lt. Col.) of Virginia, (2) Abraham Piersey; (3) Samuel Matthews, Governor of Virginia‘; the said William Harris being the ancestor of Major John Harris of Northumberland Co., whose daughter, Sarah, married a member of her Devonshire kinship group, Anthony Haynie (Haynie being a variation of Hayne, in Stowford); their daughter, Grace Haynie, marrying another probable member, Capt. George Ball, 1683-1746, of ‘Bay View’, son of Capt. Wm. Ball, and Margaret, granddaughter of Col. William Underwood. Capt. Wm. Ball married (1) Mary or Margaret Williamson, daughter of James Williamson, of Rappahannock Co. David Ball, William Ball’s brother (born September 26, 1686; died December 14, 1732); married (2) May 29, 1727, Ellen Heale, daughter of George Heale, of Lancaster Co.

George Heale was probably of a prominent Devonshire family, kin of the Harris of Hayne. Margaret Harris, sister of the heretofore mentioned Arthur Harris, husband of Margaret Daville, married William Crimes, gent., buried September 9, 1621; their daughter, Elizabeth, married Sir Francis Glanville of Tavistock and Kilworthy, who died 1638, Serjeant-at-law, whose sister, Joan, was the wife of Sampson Heale of Gnaton, Sheriff of Devon, fl. 1621. Likewise, the Ball family were also probably of Devonshire stock. A Ball family were established at Totnes (Will of William Ball, Gentleman of Totnes, Devon November 3, 1602), and at Frithelstock nr. Barnstaple, where William Harris of Hayne held land (see Will of William Ball, Yeoman of Frithelstock, Devon, September 15, 1650).

April 17, 1667. *William Ball and Thomas Chetwood. 1600 acres on North Side of Rappahannock River in Rappahannock County. Due for transportation of 32 persons: William Ball, his son, Hannah Ball (his daughter, who married David Fox*), her daughters, Mary Jones, Martha Jones. This indicates that Hannah Ball, born March 12, 1650, was a ‘widow Jones‘.

Nov. 12, 1718: Will of William Fox: “Wife Anne; daughter Mary; sisters: Hannah Spellman, Anne Fox, and Catherine Heale. Nieces Frances Spellman and Frances Fox. Nephews: David Fox and Richard Kenner; Elizabeth Vaulx, Hannah Harris, Elizabeth, Sarah and Ellen Heale, daughters of George Heale; Wm Dare; Jas. Reeves; Wm. Attchison; Thos. Frazer; Mr. Geo Hele; Maj Wm Ball; James Ball, Wm Payne. Extrs: Wife Anne and Mr Wm Payne. Wits Nicho. George,* Geo. Wall, Eliz. Diggles (B. 10, p. 275). Inventory above estate recorded February 13, 1718. Proved by Anne Chichester, late Anne Fox, and Wm Payne.

Hannah Harris was a daughter of Rodham Kenner and Hannah Fox, sister of William Fox. After the death of Rodham Kenner, Hannah Fox married Clement Spelman. Hannah Kenner was the wife of John Harris. After the death of William Fox, his widow married (Marriage bond dated July, 1719). Richard Chichester, 2nd son of John Chichester of Widworthy and Margaret Ware, who came to Virginia in 1702, bringing with him his son, John.

The Chichester family held land in Frithelstock, as did Balthazar Beare, grandfather of John, husband of Dousabell Harris: Devon Record Office, Calendar of Deeds, membrane 17, 17d. May 5, 1565: Frithelstock: Bargain and sale by John Chichester of Frithelstock, esq, to John Dennis of Orleigh, esq, and John Boteler of Parkham, gentleman, of a third part of the manner and rectory of Frithellstocke which he holds for the term of the life of Dame Honor Lisley, widow.

Visitation (J. L. Vivian (1895), Devon, 1531 + 1564 + 1620 + additions, ‘Beare of Ash’).
Arms: (Argent), three bears’ heads erased (sable), muzzled (or).
1. George Beare, d. 1577, married Julian Harper.
1.1. John Beare, of Barnstable, Devon, married Agnes Snidall, daughter of John Snidall.
1.1.1. George Beare, married (2) Mary Newcourt, daughter of *John Newcourt of Pickwell, widow of William Stone of St. Minver.
1.1.1.1. John Beare, married Dousabell Harris.

John Newcourt bought the manors of Georgeham and Pickwell in 1560. The oldest inscribed tomb in the churchyard is that of John Newcourt, who died in 1602 … ‘To the pios memorie of Tobie Newcourt of Pickwell in this parish Esqr who married Mary third daughter of Arthur Harris of Heane Esq.’ (Denise Smith, Brian Harris, A Brief History of the Church in Georgeham, 2007).

1. John Harris, Seargeant-at-Law, Recorder of Exeter, 1544.
1.1. William Harris of Hayne, m. (1) Mary Greville.
1.1.1. Arthur Harris, of Hayne & Kenegie, Sheriff of Cornwall (b. by 1561, d. May 16, 1628), married Margaret Davils, daughter of John Davils and Mary Malet. John Davils was the nephew of Amy Davils, who married Richard Dennys, of Exeter; younger brother of Sir Thomas Dennys, who married Anne Paulet, daughter of William Paulet, 3rd Marquess of Winchester.
1.1.1.1. Mary Harris, married Tobyas Newcourt, of Pickwell.
1.2. Anthony Harris, of Marwood, buried April 10, 1618, 4th son.
1.2.1. Mary Harris, married John Newcourt, of Pickwell.
For Harris, see misc Cornwall (Kenegie in Gulval, etc) deeds and papers and misc Harris family papers, c. 1270-1842.

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HILL AND BODDIE OF VIRGINIA

WIVELISCOMBE

1.
1.1. John Hill, tanner.
1.1.1. Joan Hill, m. David Edney, 30 Jan 1574. (Thus, cousin of the Bennetts).
1.1.1. Thomas Hill, bapt. (b.) 7 July 1562.
1.1.2. George Hill, b. 24 Apr 1563.
1.1.3. John Hill, b. 19 Oct. 1564, m. Agnes Forte, 26 Apr 1585.
1.1.3.1. Richard Hill, b. 29 Sept. 1587.
1.1.3.2. Margaret Hill, m. John Harrys.
1.1.3.1.1. Edward Hill, b. 16 Oct. 1615, m. Lorrilie Bennett, 4 May 1643. She was of the generation of children born to Thomas Bennett, b. Nov. 5 Nov. 1603, at Wiveliscombe (who m. Agnes Beard 17 July 1623), brother of Richard Bennett, Governor of Virginia, and nephew of Eleanor Bennett, who m. Richard Harris, 6 Oct. 1594.
1.1.3.2. Thomas Hill, b. 26 Dec 1589, m. Joan Proust, 23 Dec. 1622.
1.1.3.2.1. Francis Hill, b. 16 Mar 1623.
1.1.3.3. Franncis Hill, 9 Feb. 1588.
1.1.3.4. Christopher Hill, 15 Dec. 1592.
1.1.3.5. Ethelred Hill, m. William Hutchins, 4 Jun. 1618.
1.1.4. Edward Hill, b. 16 Jan. 1572.
1.1.4.1. Elizabeth Hill, b. 30 May 1593, m. (1) Francis Norman, 4 Feb. 1611, (2) Lawrence Comer, 3 Feb. 1620.
1.1.4.2. Agnis Hill, m. Richard Perratt, 20 May 1624.
1.2. Thomas Hill.
1.2.1. Elizabeth Hill, m. John Upham, 28 Apr. 1588.
1.2.2. Thomas Hill, b. 5 Aug. 1561, m. Agnis Collerd, 31 July 1591.
1.2.2.1. oane Hill, b. 29 Apr. 1604, m. Phillip Chaplin, 26 Sept. 1617; (2) Thomas Marsh, 22 Jan. 1624.
1.2.3. Robert Hill, b. 21 Oct 1562, m. Grace Stoke, 12 Apr. 1589.
1.2.3.1. Robert Hill.
1.2.3.1.1. William Hill, b. 11 Nov. 1615, St Decumans.
1.2.3.2. Jacobus/James Hill, m. Katherine Holcombe, 17 Oct. 1625, da. of John Holcombe and Tomazin Herringe, who m. 4 July 1607 (he m. (2). Tomasin Bull, 27 Apr. 1617) , son of Nicholas Holcombe, and br. of Christian Holcombe, who m. John Hawkes, 9 May 1614; William Holcombe, who m. Mary Perratt, 8 Feb. 1618.
1.2.3.2.1. Nicholas Hill, b. 2 Feb. 1626; d. 26 March 1674, Virginia. He m. Sylvestra Bennett, da. of Edward Bennett, and was granted 670 ac. “at the Blackwater”. Begining near Parsons bridge on the Beverdam branch at a pine in George More’s line. Robert Flake sells George Moore (his br.-in-law) land on Blackwater adj. John Oliver and Thos. Wombell (the Lancaster connection), part of 2700 ac. granted 20 Aug. 1666, p.558. George Moore’s da. Ann Moore,* m. Thomas White. Their son was John White; his Will probated 2 May 1754 (Chapman, Wills, p. 177); great-grandfather of Avis White, who m. John Harris, the son of Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688. John’s son, Joel Harris, m. Martha Barham, da. of James Barham and Mary Thorpe, and granddau. of Charles Barham and Sarah Judkin. *Ann Moore’s sister Magdalen Moore, m. Thomas Carter Jr. Aug. 11, 1673: “George Moore, in consideration of the marriage between Thomas Carter and Magdalen, daughter of said Moore, gives to Thomas Carter, and Magdalen in writing, 400 acres land laid out of dividend of 1400 acres in Blackwater Swamp”. John Munger was a close associate of the Carters; among the headrighs claimed by him were Charles Barcroft and George Moore. Another neighbour on Lawne’s Creek was James Tooke, an associate of William Carter, both being members of the Vintners’ Co. Many of these merchants were lifelong aquaintances; their children continued to intermarry for generations.
1.2.3.2.1.1. Richard Hill, of Craven Co.; his Will probated 18 Mar. 1729, naming granddau. Elizabeth, br. Francis Hill, da. Ann Jones; son-in-law, Evan Jones. W. James Taylor, Thomas Jones, John Lewis.
1.2.3.2.1.1.1. Elizabeth Hill, m. William Thomas.
1.2.3.2.1.1.1.1. Elizabeth Thomas, m. (2) John Boddie.
1.2.3.2.1.1.1.1.1. William Boddie, m. Mary Bennett, da. William Bennett, son of James Bennett, second son of Richard Bennett Jr. William Bennett was mentioned in the will of Matthew Fones, probated in IOW, 1704, witnessed by Thomas Woods, who, in 1669, deeded land to Richard Bennett Sr. “of Blackwater”. On 9 Jan. 1706, Robert Lawrence Jr. sells to Robert Crawford of Lawne’s Creek Parish, Surry, 150 ac. granted to my father, 23 Sept. 1643, which lay next to the land of the widow, Alice Bennett (see earlier notes), and a deed of Robert Lawrence Jr. stated: “This day being the 8th of April, 1706, William Bennett has given peaceable possession of these premises to Robert Lawrence of I0W in the presence of these witnesses, Carter Crawford, William Brantley.”

Robert Crawford had m. Elizabeth, da. of George Carter, thus, was kin of the Moore family. John and James Carter witnessed the will of Richard Bennett, Jr., in 1720. Carter Crawford, son of Robert, m. Sarah Swann, da. of Matthew Swann, and had issue Carter Crawford, Jr., who m. Elizabeth Kearney, sister of Mary Kearney, who m. William Bennett, Jr. (son of the above William). William Bennett may have married twice, and his first wife may have been Mary Hardy, a neighbour in IOW. Matthew Fones witnessed the will of Mary Hardy’s father, in 1694.

William Bennett’s Will, probated Feb. 1765, named daus. Grace Hill and Anne Ruffin, grandsons, Bennett Hill, William Ruffin (200 ac. of land in Edgecombe Co.); Nathan Boddie, and Willis Boddie. (Boddie, pp. 305-309). William’s father, “James Bennett, of Southwark Parish in the County of Surry, give to my son William Bennett plantation on which he now lives and part of a tract formerly bought of Charles Binns; to my son James 20 sh.; to my son John all my carpenters and coopers tools now in his possession. To daus. Anne, Martha, Mary and Sarah, personalty. To my daughter Bridget the use of my best house and as much land as she can work. To my son Samuel the use of my plantation where he now lives. After death of Samuel and his wife without male issue I give plantation to my grandson, Thomas Bennett, son of William Bennett. Samuel to be exr. Test. Charles Binns, Wm Goodwyn, Wm. Batt, Wm. Clark. Probated 17 Oct. 1752 (Wills 3, p. 804)

On 26 Sept. 1737, John Mangum’s estate was appraised by John Davis, Edward Brantly, and Joseph Ward. John Mangum had been living in Lower Parish, Surry Co, with the Bennett family.

In Feb 1779, William Bennett, orphan of William Bennett, dec. made choice of Charles Judkins as guardian. (Orders, 1775-1782, p. 80).

 

BODDIE

WIVELISCOMBE

1. Richard Boddy, bur. 11 Oct. 1560.
1.1. Richard Boddy, bur. 10 Jul. 1570.
1.2. John Boddy Sr., bur. 1 Jan. 1576.
1.2.1. John Boddy bur. 6 Jan. 1581.
1.2.1.1. Katherine Boddy, m. Christopher Blackford, 5 May 1575 (Clarke, Collins, Perse).
1.2.1.2. Joan Boddy, m. John Norman, 3 Aug. 1579 (Hill, Salmon, Snow).
1.2.1.3. Robert Body, bur. 13 Apr. 1608, m. Elizabeth Skinner, 20 Oct. 1586 (Webber).
1.2.1.3.1. Susan Boddy, m. John Preeste, 26 Sep. 1601 (Northe).
1.2.1.3.2. John Bodie, bapt. 24 Oct. 1592, m. Christian Harkswell, 19 Sep 1621.
1.2.1.3.2.1. Henry Body, m. Mary Light (Lide), 11 Jun. 1655 (Slade, Woolcott).
1.2.1.3.3. Robert Body, bapt. 5 Jun. 1596, m. Joan Taylor, 8 Sep. 1617 (Andrews, Moore, Upham, Hobbes).
1.2.1.3.3.1. Robert Body.
1.2.1.3.3.1.1. Robert Body, bapt. 26 Jun 1633.
1.2.1.3.4. William Body, bapt 21 Jul. 1602.
1.2.1.3.4.1, William Body. On 12 July 1665 John Marshall received a grant of 700 acres next to Capt. Anthony Fulgham’s grant and six of his headrights were assigned to him by William Boddie who, on that same day, was granted 3350 acres lying next to Fulgham’s and Marshall’s grants.

(Names in brackets are kinship connections).

copyright m stanhope 2017

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ENGLISH WEST COUNTRY FAMILIES IN VIRGINIA

When researching the possible origins of Edward Brantley of Virginia, it seems pertinent to consider the area parallel to the Bristol Channel; Wrington being its southerly outpost, Gloucester its northerly, and Bristol being between – the main area connected to John Seward, who claimed his headright: John Seward, 400 ac., 18 June 1638, upon North side of a S.W. creek setting out of the main creek commonly called Cary’s Neck. Due for trans. of 8 persons including Edward Brantly, Anthony Matthews, Gerson Cromwell. Edward Brantly, 30 Oct. 1669, 675 ac. adj. land of Mr. England and Mr. Tooke (associated with Thomas Harris, d. 1672).

Within this confine, we find a “John Brantley brasier”, who was aged about 40, and judged to fit to serve in the county militia with a caliver (a light matchlock weapon). This was of the third order of competence, the first two being a pikeman and a musketeer. John Brantley was described as living in Gloucester, North Ward. (John Smith, Men and Armour, MS. 14, 15, 16).

The search for any Brantley is hindered by the variety of spelling. The Bishop’s transcripts and parish registers of St. Catherine’s, Gloucester, show Brantle and Bryntley as two derivatives.

Yet, what seems most relevant are register entries of St Mary’s, Cheltenham, some 8 miles from Gloucester, which show Robert Brantly (Brentle) “bachelor” marrying Joan Goodriche “spinster”, on 16 October 1589. She may have been the da. of Thomas Goodrich and Joan Davis, who married on 3 February 1559; and she may have also been she who remarried to Gyles Mathews, on 28 November 1603.

Clarity is hindered by the inconsistency of church registry entries, yet what is evident is that the Goodrich family of Cheltenham were substantial leasors of land, and of the order of minor gentry:

Quitclaim. (1) John Goodrich, and William Goodrich, gentlemen, Thomas Butler gentleman and Joyce his wife. (2) John Alisaunder alias Mansell of Chorleton Kyngs, yeoman. 1 messuage and all the lands tenements fields meadows and pastures in Downehatherley and 2 tenements buildings with 2 gardens lying next to them situate in the parish of St. John the Baptist in the City of Gloucester, etc. (Gloucestershire Archives. D3117/190. 1538).

Hawthorne v Goodriche. Plaintiffs: Elizabeth Hawthorne, widow. Defendants: Robert Goodriche. Subject of decree: Toft and 1 yardland in Northfield in Charlton Kings, Gloucestershire, of the manor of Cheltenham. (National Arcives, C 78/8/37. 29 Oct. 1552).

Goodriche v Atkyns. Plaintiffs: Eleanor and Ralph Goodriche. Defendants: Rowland Atkyns alias Goodriche. Subject: Messuage and land in the manor of West End Naunton in Cheltenham and Charlton Kings of the settlement of Richard Goodriche, deceased, husband of the said Eleanor and father of the said Ralph. Gloucestershire. (ibid., C 1/1432/24-28. 1556-1558).

Goodrich alias v Hawle. Plaintiffs: Rowland Goodrich alias Rowland Atkyns. Defendants: Henry Hawle. Subject: copyhold held of the manor of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. (ibid., C 1/1432/24-28. 1558-1579).

Merry v Goodrich. Plaintiffs: John Merry. Defendants: Richard Goodrich and Robert Goodrich his son. Subject: To remove a cause. Land holden of the manor of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, respecting which a suit is depending in the court of the said manor. (ibid., C 2/Eliz/M2/16. 1558-1603).

Reynolde v Goodriche. Plaintiffs: Thomas Reynoldes and his wife Jane, and Arthur Bromley and his wife Mary. Defendants: Rowland Goodriche. Subject of decree: Twelve messuages and 740 acres of land and woods in Ham, Neastend and Naunton in parishes of Charlton Kings and Cheltenham, Gloucestershire. (ibid, C 78/31/9. 24 June 1566).

Hawthorne v Goodriche. Plaintiffs: Elizabeth Hawthorne, widow. Defendants: Robert Goodriche. Subject of decree: Toft and 1 yardland in Northfield in Charlton Kings, Gloucestershire, of the manor of Cheltenham. (ibid., C 78/8/37. 29 October 1552).

Hawthorne v Goodriche. Plaintiffs: John Hawthorne and John Merrye, both of Charlton Kings, Gloucestershire, yeo. Defendants: Richard Goodriche and Robert Goodriche (Jr.) his son. Subject of decree: Possession of copyhold lands in the parish of Charlton Kings held of the manor of Cheltenham. (ibid., C 78/31/9. 20 June 1601).

Joan Goodriche, the wife of Robert Brantley, as suggested, may have been the daughter of Thomas Goodrich and Joan Davis, and he a younger brother of Robert Goodriche Jr., but what of Robert Brantley?

His surname does not otherwise appear in the registers of St Mary’s, and this suggests that a common practice was being followed: that his wedding was taking place in the parish of his wealthy in-laws. 

This still leaves the question of the origins of his family unresolved, yet the social conventions of the time strongly suggest an answer: It would be highly unlikely that someone marrying into the Goodrich family was not of the Brantleys of Evesham, situated 17 miles from Cheltenham, and of an equal social status, albeit junior members of each family are probably concerned.

The known ancestry of the Evesham Brantleys relatively sparse; commencing with Richard Brantley, bapt. 1551; Serjeant of the Mace for Evesham. He was probably the brother of: 1. Thomas Brantley, who married Christian Burley, in 1587; he the father of Edward Brantley, who died in infancy; 2. William Brantley; 3. (it may be suggested), Robert Brantley, who married Joan Goodrich.

A number of sons of the next generation – John Brantley 1573, William Brantley, 1580, John Brantley, 1581, Thomas Brantley, 1583, sons of Robert; Thomas Brantley, 1591, Richard Brantley, 1592, may have been the father of Edward Brantley of Virginia. (Dates as baptisms).

Robert Brantley, who married Joan Goodrich, would be the most obvious of candidates, given later connections in Virginia:

1. George Moore (brother of Thomas Moore*), m. Jane Barcroft, da. of Charles Barcroft, a London vintner. George Moore (son of John Moore, mariner and merchant of Bristol), stated to be “age 78 years” when he made his will in 1710 (Chapman, IOW Wills, p. 54).

Sister to George and Thomas was Katherine Moore, who married (2) Robert Flake (a tobacco factor for Bristol merchants). By her first husband, she had issue:

Joyce, who married (1) Francis England, (2) George Cripps. Francis (F. E.) England, George Cripps. William Jennings of Bristol, surgeon, appts. Thomas Moore of Pagan Creek his atty. to collect from Arthur Skynner, Gyles Dryver (headright of Thomas Harris, d. 1672), and Joseph Whitson, and by virtue of a letter of atty. from John Hardiman of Bristol, taylor, to collect from William Hoodson in Nansemond. 29 June 1667. (Bodie, vol. 2, p. 550). Francis England was probably closely related to John England: Surrender of lease – John England of Bristol, merchant to John Seymour. (Bristol Archives, 8017/24. 20 April 1676).

1.1. Eleanor Moore, married Richard Piland, the son of James Piland, bapt. on 30 August 1604, in St Mary’s Le Porte, Bristol, headright of Francis England, in 1642. In the Will of John Oliver, written 19 April 1652, he wrote, “I do appoint my loving friends James Piland and Robert Bird”.
1.1.1. James Piland. On 28 April 1720, he, Benjamin Hodges, and Roger Ingram witnessed the will of Robert Lancaster. James Piland, and James Wilson were appointed executors of the will of Hester Brantley, who was their second-cousin once removed, and sister of Elizabeth Joyner. James Piland, Arthur Wills, and James Wilson appraised the estate of John Brantley, on 26 April 1725.
1.1.1.1. James Piland, married Elizabeth Brantley, da. of Phillip (son of Edward) and Joyce (Lewis) Brantley; the da. of Rebecca George (da. of John) and Thomas Lewis. John and Nicholas George of Virginia were very probably of the Gorges of Portbury, Somerset, a junior line of those of Wraxall. Nicholas George was the father-in-law of Thomas Harris, d. 1672.
1.2. Ann Moore, married Thomas White. The estates of Ann Moore and her husband Thomas White were appraised between 22 March 1741 and 26 July 1742 by Thomas Day, John Goodrich, and Edward Brantley. (Chapman, Wills, p. 142). Edward Brantley was security for the estate of Thomas Harris, d. 1672.

*February 1692: Thomas Moore and Thomas Thorpe. sworn by Capt. John Goodrich to appraise the estate of Richard Towle. (D.B 1, p. 133). John Goodrich was an overseer of the Will of Francis England; a witness being Richard Bennett (cousin of Thomas Harris, d. 1672). Security later given by Richard Sharpe. (R. 9 June 1677). George Bechinoe’s Will was witnessed by Robert Kae, an overseer of the Will of John Goodrich Jr. George Moore administered the estate of George Bechinoe.

1 John Goodrich, 1616-1698, by deposition. April 18 1679, Joyce Cripps: Leg. Husb. George cripps the lands and tenements given me by my former husband, Francis England, to the son of Francis England … Goddaughters, Elizabeth Hayes, Joyce Butler, and Joyce Wombwell … my three Godsons, James Bennett, Nicholas Davis, and William Phillips, my mother Flake. My husband Extr. R. 9 June 1679. Wit: John Gutridge (Goodrich), Rebecca Davis, Will Evans. (W&D B. 2, P. 202).
1.1. Capt. John Goodrich, 13 January 1695: Legatees: Son George land adjoining Thomas Proud and Thomas Thorpe, son John the land on which Thomas Drew now lives, land bought of Gilbert Adams to my two aforesaid sons, daus. Honour, Constancy and Mary, da. Elizabeth the land given her by her grandfather in law George Cripps. Wife Extx. Overseers: my brother Robert Kae and Mr. James Day. R. June 9, 1696.(W&D B. 2, p. 369). John Goodrich m. Anne Bechinoe, da. of Edward Bechinoe; an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, who died in 1677. June 9, 1679: Edward Bechinoe Estate. Mary Bechinoe, Richard Bennett.
1.1.1. John Goodrich Jr. The Newport Parish, IOW Co., Vestry Book, 12 February 1727, shows John Goodrich as a neighbour of Edward and James Brantley.

SEWARD

1. Bartholomew Seward.
1.1. William Seward. Bond in £6 by John Woode of Bristol, merchant, and John Cutt of Burnett, Somerset (17 mls fr. Wrington), gentleman, to William Lavington of Bristol, merchant, to be void if Wood and Cutt, their heirs, administrators, executors or assigns, pay £3 to Lavington, his heirs, administrators, executors or assigns, by 29 September 1594 at Lavington’s house in the Backe in Bristol. Signed by Wood and Cutte, and witness William, son of Bartholomew Seward. (WARD 2/54A/184/8).
1.1.1. Robert Seward, evidenced here; 1. Hierome Ham and Nicholas Meredith, gents. Ald. Abel Kitchin, Christopher Whitson, Henry Yate, John Northall, Abel Kitchin jun. Thomas Farman, Robert Kitchin, Robert Seward, William Yeomans, William Heaminge, Richard Jones (of Wrington and Chew Magna), Thomas Whittorne, Humfry Read, William Lymell, James Birkin, William Brinsdon, Toby Patch, Gabriel Deeme, Luke Hodges (cousin of the Wedmore Hodges), Edward Gerrish, Thomas Turner, Henry Gibbes, jun., Henry Yate, jun., John Kitchin, Henry Northall, William Yeaman. Parish lands of Christchurch; details given. (Bristol Archives, P/Xch/F/1. 18 Dec. 1626).
1.1.1.1. John Seaward, evidenced here: 400 ac. IOW Co.; 18 June 1638. Upon Warresquioke River. Beginning at a pynie pint by a little gutt running into the woods right over against the land of Nathaniell Floyd and near his former pattent. “Francis Hobbs’now wife Mary was former wife of Nathaniel Floyd deceased”. Francis Hobbs’ da. was the wife of John Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1672. Francis Hobbs. Leg.- Alice Davis; cousin John Davis (the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677, owed him money); cousin Margaret Harris the da. of John Harris. Ex., brother John Harris. R. 9 June 1688. Samuel Davis, sold this plot to John Bond, whose family, as the Fulghams, were of Pitminster, Somerset, and tenants of the Symes. John Seward was a headright of John Moone, in Warrasquinoake, in 1635. John Moone was kin of the Fulghams, Anthony Fulgham’s brother, Thomas, having married Mary (Moone) Green, half-sister of Sarah Moone, wife of John Pitt, of Bristol.

1. Thomas Pitt of Blandford Forum, North Dorset, m. Priscilla.
1.1. William Pitt, b. 1578, Bristol (encompasses North Somerset and South Gloucestershire); d. 25 Oct. 1624, in Bristol, Will pr. 3 Feb. 1625. I give my son William my best Turkey ring, which was my great grandfather’s, Mr. Roger Cookes. My second ring with pearl I give to son Robert. My signet ring I give my son Henry, and my ruby ring to my son Thomas. My books to son William, Sons to have their portion at one and twenty and daus. at twenty or marriage. Brother-in-law Richard Davis 20s for a ring and sister Mary Davis a double Harry gold sovereign of gold. William Pitt married Mary Owen, da. of Robert Owen, of Bristol, Merchant. His Will was probated 16 Feb. 1615 (8 Cope), mentioning “My cousin Rice Davies, esq. My brother in law William Pitt, overseer”. His da., Mary, m. Richard Davis esq, of Tickenham. Rice Davies m., thirdly, Mary Pitt, widow of Robert Owen. His first wife was Dorothy, da. of Maurice Rodney, Esq., and sister of Sir George Rodney; thus, his family were of familial association with the Hodges of Wedmore; from which stock came Hodges Council of Virginia.
1.1.1. William Pitt, held land in Redcliffe Street, Bistol.
1.1.2. Henry Pitt. He was Captain Henry Pitt, of Pagan Creek, who m. (2) Ann, widow of Robert Watson. His son, Thomas, m. Col. Athur Smith’s da., Mary. (see as follows).
1.1.3. Col. Robert Pitt, d. bef. 9 Jan. 1674, IOW. He was Captain of ‘the Thunder’, a merchant ship out of Bristol, and a Colonel in the Virginia Militia.
1.1.3.1. John Pitt, married Olive, da. of John Hardy and Alice Bennett, and relict of Giles Driver (of Bristol), a headright of Thomas Harris, who died in 1672, as stated.

It was not that John Seward was strictly of Bristol, Gloucestershire, as his Will indicates. The border between Gloucestershire and Somerset was not the firm concept that it is now, and his farm in Butcombe, Somerset, leased from Edward Bampfield, was only 11 miles from Bristol. He bequested lands in Barrington (as it correctly reads); northwest of Petherton, 17 miles from Wiveliscombe, and 23 miles from Wrington. His wife was bequested “other lands bought in that county from Thomas Parsyvall”. This bequest certainly included lands in Hemington: “Seward, John, immigrant, came to Virginia from Bristol, England, before 1635. He was a merchant and had grants of land in Isle of Wight county, one of which was called “New Hemington.” (Tyler, Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography). Hemington is 4 miles fom Mells/Nunney, and was the domain of the the Bampfields. It was there that Ann Harris (da. of William), bapt. 14 Dec. 1645, married William Persons (born 1649), on 20 Sept. 1674.

John Seward, “Merchant being bound to Sea on a Voyage of Bristol”, died in 1651 (PROB 11/216/686: Will of John Seward, Merchant being bound to Sea on a Voyage of Bristol, Gloucestershire). Francis Yeomans of Bristol, gent., and Walter Stephens of Bristol, mercer, were named overseers, and receive 40s. apiece.

Walter Stephens witnessed the following marriage settlement by deed: 1. Henry Pitt (aforementioned), merchant. 2. Thomas Dale of Wrington, Somerset, gent., Walter Stephens, mercer, John Price and William Shute, gent. Premises: One messuage in Redcliffe Street, St. Thomas One garden near St.Thomas’ Lane, St. Thomas One messuage in Redcliffe Street, Redcliffe. Consideration: Marriage, already solemnised between Henry Pitt and Margaret, da. of Thomas Dale and £450 dowry. (Bristol Archives, 9 June 1635).

It is very probable that John Seward was of a family which straddled the Gloucestershire/Somerset border, as was the case of many of his fellow Bristol mariners, an example being Francis Derrick, the purchaser of Sergeant John Harris’s land, who held land in Somerset, near Wedmore.

The following probates may be of relevance to the wider family of John Seward: PROB 11/203/38: Will of John Seward, Gentleman of Kingston Seymour, Somerset. 7 January 1648. PROB 11/245/378: Will of John Seward, Gentleman of Kilmington, Somerset. 22 May 1655.

As given, John Seward claimed the headright of Edward Brantley.

BECHINOE

1. George Bechinoe.
1.1. Conyers Bechinoe: Bechinoe v Eckly. Plaintiffs: Conyers Bechinoe and others. Defendants: John Eckly and others. Place or subject: property in Henbury, Bristol etc, Gloucestershire. (C 7/540/16m 1678) PROB 11/359/166: Will of John Eckly, Apothecary of Bristol, Gloucestershire 6 Feb. 1679. Dennis Hollister of the City of Bristol, grocer, 1 September 1675, with a codicil bearing date 6 July 1676, proved 21 July 1676: To son, “my corner house and shop which I bought of Richard Jones, in the parish called Mary Part in Bristol (from whence the Pilands) … To my da. Lydia Jordan, wife of Thomas Jordan, my new house lately built at Frampton Cotterel … next to my grandda., Bridget Jordan, my da. Lydia’s eldest da., and a portion to my grandda. Lydia Jordan … my da. Phebe Hollister half of my Inn called the Whitehart, in Broad Street, one fourth part of which was my wife’s inheritance and one fourth I lately bought of Anne Yeomans deceased, and one other fourth part I lately bought of Edmond French, son and heir of Elizabeth French also deceased, and the other fourth part I lately bought of Henry Rowe and Judith his wife, which said Judith, Elizabeth, Ann and my wife were the daus. and coheirs of Edmond Popley, merchant deceased. Witnesses I. Chauncy, John Eckly, Rich. Hawksworth. Richard Jones:

William Hancock m. Elizabeth Spencer, da. of Nicholas Spencer, and sister of Robert Spencer, who m. Elazabeth White da. of Captain John White of Surry Co. His widow remarried to Captain William Corker. William Hancock’s son and namesake m. Elizabeth Spencer, having issue: John Hancock, who m. Jane Holt. da. of Randall Holt Jr. and Elizabeth Hansford, da. of John Hansford of York Co. and Elizaeth Jones, da. of Richard Jones. John Hansford; his will written in 1654, noted that Robert Jones was the tutor of his children and leaves him a legacy of 500 lbs. of tobacco.

The will of Elizabeth Hansord was record in February, 1677: I give & bequeath unto my sonne Wiliam Hansford 7 his heirs forever that seat of land now in the possession of William Coman scituate & lying & beingin Bruton Parish being my right & due as being the surviving child of Mr. Richard Jones my father dec’d.

Elizabeth Jones, wife of Richard, had obtained Power of Attorny over her husbands estate when he briefly left Virginia. She was to be assisted by George Light (Lyde), her husbands friend. After Richard’s death, in 1660, Light claimed that his estate owed him £8 for the building of a Tobacco House. On 23 August, 1660, Henry Andrews, of London, Merchant, gave Letter of Attorney to George Light to recover from Elizabeth Jones, widow and executrix of Richard Jones, late of Virginia, decd. Witnessed in London by Robert Spencer.

William Lyde (Light), m. Elizabeth Jones, da. of “Richard Jones Esq., of Stowey, Co. Somerset”(Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre, ref. 212B/709. 7 Aug. 1669).
Richard Jones Esq. of Stowey in Chew Magna ; born 1605 and Joyce Woodward, had issue, baptised at Stowey:
Thomas Jones, 1 Jan. 1627.
William Jones, 5 Jul. 1630.
Richard Jones, 3 Apr 1634.
Elizabeth Jones 29 Sept. 1636.
Richard Jones, 8 Mar. 1637. His younger sibling was not deceased, but may have been ill.
Susanna Jones 28 Mar. 1639.
Samuel Jones, 22 Jun. 1640.
John Jones, 7 Apr. 1642.

1.2. Edward Bechinoe, d. 9 June 1679, m. Mary.
1.2.1. George Bechinoe, d. aft. 10 Aug. 1700.
1.2.1.1. Edward Bechinoe.
1.2.2. Anne ‘Alice’ Bechinoe, d. 1712, m. (1) Robert Kæ, (2) John Goodrich Jr., b. 9 April 1653, d. 9 June 1695.
1.2.2.1. Elizabeth Goodrich, d. 1737, m. Francis Wrenn.
1.2.2.2. Honour Goodrich, d. 1760, m. (1) James Wilson, (2) Thomas Pierce.
1.2.2.3. Constance Goodrich, d. 1752, m. (1) Benjamin Hodges, (2) John Harrison.
1.2.2.4. Mary Goodrich, m. George Riddick, d. 7 April 1727.

HARRIS

1. William Harris, m. Dorothy Westbrooke, 31 Aug. 1562, in Wiveliscombe; kin of a family of Forte.
1.1. Richard Harris, m. (8 Oct. 1594), Eleanor Bennet, sister of (1) Thomas Bennett, who had issue: (1) Thomas Bennett, b. Nov. 11, 1603 at Wiveliscombe, father of Alice Bennett, who m. John Hardy. Nugent, C&P vol. 1, p. 569; their da., Lucy, m. Hodges Council; her sister m. Richard Jackson, their da., Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677. (2) Richard Bennett, bapt. 6 Aug. 1609, Governor of Virginia. (2) Edward Bennett.
1.1.1. William Harris, bapt. 28 Jan. 1595. He may have been the William Harris, headright of John Moone in IOW, in 1637 – the Fulgham connection.
1.1.2. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, in Wiveliscombe, Somerset, probably he who d. in Virginia in 1672. Thomas Harris was the cousin of Richard Bennett, whose first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife. Thomas Harris, Will recorded 13 Nov. 1672. Security: John Newman and Edward Brantley. Thomas Harris was also the nephew of Edward Bennett. Christopher Reynolds Sr. emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, “Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds Jr. all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan (his son-in-law who m. da. Elizabeth Reynolds) now liveth upon”.
1.1.2.1. John Harris. William Groves, appraisal by John Harris, Edward Brantley, Elias Fort and Edward Grantham; recorded 9 Feb. 1678. (B. 2, p. 172). John Harris m. a da. of Francis Hobbs, who sold Edward Brantley 675 ac. adj. Thomas Tuke, in 1669.
1.1.2.2. Thomas Harris, d. 1688. Probably he bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, in Cheddar (the domain of the Lancasters, who also held land in Wiveliscombe), ‘son of Thomas’.
1.1.2.2.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1730: Thomas Harris 290 ac. IOW, on the Maherin River and both sides of Herbert’s Branch adj. Edward Brantley (son of Phillip and Joyce Lewis), and William Simmons line, 24 March 1725. Edward Brantley, John Thorpe, and Thomas Purcell appraisers. Edward Brantley’s son, John, m. the widow of Thomas Harris, Hannah Judkins.
1.1.2.2.2. Robert Harris.
1.1.2.2.2.1. John Harris, d. 1772 in Southampton Co., m. Avis White.
1.1.3. Richard Harris.
1.1.3.1. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624; probably d. 1687, Virginia, m. Unity. He was the second-cousin of Richard Bennett, Governor of Virginia, whose first wife, Anne, was Charles Barham’s sister.
1.1.2.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of her 2nd husband, Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710.
1.1.2.2. John Harris. On 9 Nov. 1708, Samuel Lancaster was granted the administration of the estate of John Harris, his brother-in-law
1.1.4. Robert Harris. Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease.
1.1.4.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, Wedmore (juxta Cheddar), ‘son of Robert’; he who probably d. in 1677, in Virginia.

RIDLEY

1. John Ridley, Iron Acton, gent., W., and Margery Machin, Ham.
1.1. Thomas Ridley. John Harvey, clerk v. Thomas Ridley: Rectory and parish of Iron Acton, in the county of Gloucester. Tithes.: Gloucester 19 Chas 2. (Bristol Archives, E 134/19Chas2/East26). Marriage settlement. 1 Elizabeth (relict of Thomas) Ridley of Iron Acton, Glos, widow. 2 Thomas Smith of Yate, Glos, gent. 3 Alexander Tomes of Wickwarr, gent and John Neale of Yate, yeoman … several closes of meadow or pasture … etc. … all in Wickwarr in tenure of Elizabeth Ridley formerly purchased by John Tomes late father of Elizabeth Ridley from James Woolworth als Webb and wife Christian and bequeathed to Elizabeth Ridley by will of John Tomes; to use of Elizabeth Ridley for life; then to use of Thomas Smith for life, then to their issue, in default of which, to right heirs of Elizabeth Ridley. (Bristol Archives, P/HTS/I/4/g 1677. 2-3 Nov. 1677).
1.2. John Ridley, Will probated 26 Apr 1699.

William Machin married Elizabeth Ridley, at Winterbourne, Somerset, the parish of John Seward’s wife.

MERRICK

Will of William Merrick, merchant, of Bristol. Provides for annuity of £70 for wife Sarah to bring her jointure to £150 p.a., as previously agreed. Lands, mess., ten., plantations, negro slaves, etc., in Barbodoes and England to son, Thomas Merrick.
House, etc., in St. Michaels Hill, Bristol, to wife, Sarah. No note of Probate. ( Bristol Archives, JER/WA/30/6. 29 Oct. 1684).

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BYNUM

It would seem somewhat dampening to the spirit of those seeking the origins of the following Bynums to give lengthy detail of a Harris family of Wiveliscombe, Somerset, so suffice it to impart that Edward Bennett, uncle of Thomas Harris of that place, was associated with Christopher Reynolds Sr., who emigrated to Virginia as his indentured servant. Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, “Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds Jr. all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan (his son-in-law who m. da. Elizabeth Reynolds) now liveth upon”. It may also be of use to mention that the family of Lancaster (Squires of Cheddar juxta Wedmore) were associated with Wiveliscombe, and that these Harris were kin of  families of Forte and Bodie.

In Wiveliscombe, John Benham/Bainham, bur. 1 Sept. 1601, was the father of Phillip Benham, who m. Ellinor, 4 July 1560; they the parents of Thomas Benham, bapt. 7 June 1566, and Tobias Benham, bapt. 8 May 1579; either of these being the father of Richard Benham, father of James Benham, bapt. 2 Nov., 1639. In Wedmore, Henry Bainham, who died in Wiveliscombe, was the father of Thomas Bainham, bapt. 22 Apr 1578; they of certain relationship to George Bainham, who m. Julianam Gane, 18 Jan. 1591. She m. 2. William Day, 1 Oct. 1595. Julia Gane was the aunt of John Gane, bapt. 8 Sept. 1588, father of Judith Gane, bapt. 21 Nov 1619, who m. William Popham, 29 May 1643, br. of George Popham, who m. Mary Comer 30 Apr 1635, relict of John Councell, who she m. 26 Nov 1631; the very probable uncle of Hodges Councell of Virginia; with Mary Comer being the sister of the wife of John Harris of Cheddar, tenant of the Lancasters, and probable uncle of Thomas Harris, d. 1688.

It is with this rather scanty kinship outline that the following Bynums are introduced; it has to be so, because the connection between English and Virginia ancestries is one of repeated relationships. Stripped of assumptions, the following is most likely true:

1. Richard Bynum, Wiveliscombe.

1.1. John Bynum. On 29 September 1679, John Bynum sold to Richard Jordan Sr. the land he had purchased from George Blow.

1.2. James Bynum, bapt. 2 Nov. 1639, in Wiveliscombe; d. c. 1720, Surry Co. There is no evidence that she married a Mizzell, nor that the Mizells were French Hugenots. Massall/Mascell were not such uncommon English names. See Robert W. Baird: “There is no association at all between any Bynums and Mizells prior to 1691. They lived in different parts of the county, were enumerated in different tax districts, and their paths never crossed in any record. The first association between the families is a purchase of land adjoining Luke Mizell Jr. by James Bynum in 1691. Elizabeth Bynum’s witness of Luke Mizell’s will two years later, and James Bynum’s appointment as an appraiser of the estate can be explained by the fact that they were next-door neighbors” … “other witnesses and appraisers were also neighbors and no one has assumed that they were” internarried with the Bynums. In this case, James Bynum’s d.o.b. can not be assumed on the supposition of a marriage.

1.2.1. William Bynum, m. Mary Fort. He witnessed the will of his father-in-law John Fort on 21 October 1724 in Surry Co. In 1730, he witnessed Mary Fort’s discharge of dower in land conveyed by her husband, John Fort, Jr. to Davis Hopper on the Moratock in Bertie Precinct. (Bertie Co. D.B. C, p. 252). On 3 December 1744, William Bynum bought 300 ac. from Thomas Drake in Edgecombe Co. on the upper side of Fishing Creek. William Bynum (first cousin of William Bynum, aforesaid, married Elizabeth Sugars Fort, the widow of Mary Fort’s first cousin, Elias Fort, and the da. of John Sugars. She left a will in Southampton Co. proved 3 July 1773, leaving slaves to her sons and dau.: William Bynum, Benjamin Bynum, and Abigail Williamson,and the residual estate to son Michael Bynum. Specific bequests were made to grandson Cordall Norfleet Bynum, son of Cordall Norfleet and Ann Bynum, da. of Michael. Cordall Norfleet was the son of Joseph Norfleet, first-cousin of Marmaduke Norfleet, whose da., Elizabeth Norfleet, m. James Harris in Halifax Co, NC., son of: James Harris, Will pr. 10 Jan. 1749; son of Edward Harris and Mary Turner; his Will was pr. 25 March 1734, in IOW Co.; son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688. Mary Fort was the da. of John Fort and Elizabeth Jordan, named in her father’s Will of 24 Sept. 1695 as Elizabeth Fort, da. of Richard Jordan Jr., son of Richard Jordan Sr., aforementioned.

1.2.1.1. William Bynum, m. Mary Crocker, 13 Jan. 1762, Southampton Co., da. of Benjamin Crocker and Sarah Barrow. Benjamin Crocker was the son of Robert Crocker, who named sons Benjamin, Moses, and Arthur in his will, recorded 10 Jan. 1750; his estate being appraised by William Bynum, John Harris, and Arthur Long. Robert Crocker named his daus., Elizabeth Jordan, Sarah Braswell, and Mary Middleton. His son, William Crocker, Will dated 27 Oct. 1729, pre-deceased him, and was the father of Joseph Crocker; Will recorded 5 Feb. 1761, appraised by Thomas Holliman, who m. Catherine Lancaster, da. of Elizabeth Harris and Samuel Lancaster. Catherine Lancaster was the sister of (1) Martha Lancaster, who m. John Holliman, son of Christopher Holliman, Jr. 25 Sept. 1739: From Christopher Holliman of Bartee precinct, North Carolina, and John Holliman of Newport parish in IOW, to Arthur Crocker of Newport Parish in IOW … 300 ac. on the E. side the main Swamp in Newport Parish. (D. B. 5, p. 143). (2) Unity Lancaster, who m. Thomas Betts, whose estate was appraised by Henry Lancaster, Abraham Jones, and William Harris, and recorded 6 May 1773. (3) Mary Lancaster, m. William Drake, son of Richard Drake, Will probated 13 Sept. 1759. Richard Drake was the son of Thomas Drake, b. 1650, in South Petherton, Somerset, and Sarah. Richard Drake, b. 1696; d. 1759, Southampton Co. Will recorded W.B. 1, p. 313. He patented land in IOW in 1717, and in 1746 he received other patents, see Bertie Co, D.B. B, p. 132, D, p. 245; E, p. 52. Richard Drake was the br. of John Drake. born 1695, d. 1729 in Bertie Co. He m. Sarah Bryant in 1725, da. of James Bryant, and sister of Eleanor Bryant, wife of Richard Braswell, Mary Bryant, wife of Richard Sumner; and (paternal) half-sister of Robert Bryant, who had issue: Lewis Bryant, who m. Celia Holliman on 18 Nov, 1776 in Johnston, NC.; Arpey Bryant, who m. Richard Holleman on 8 Jan. 1768, in Johnston; Elizabeth Bryant, who m. James Grantson Holliman (the probable son of Samuel and his wife, Elizabeth Jones), on 16 Apr. 1772, in Johnston. Richard and John Drake were the nephews of John Drake, born 1647 in South Petherton. He m. Jemima Parnell in 1675, and patented land in IOW in 1682. Will of Thomas Parnell, cooper, dated 10 Oct. 1687; proved 9 June 1688: Sons Thomas, Joseph; dau. Susanna; 3 daus; my children shall be brought up in the fear of the Lord and to learne to wright and reade; Sister Jemima Drake. My cloth coate or hayre camlett coat to Mr. John Fulgeham; John Drake; Joane Johnson; cozen John Williams; cousen Sarah Williams to have my dau. Jane’s best suit of apparell. John Drake was the father of John Drake, b. 1680, fatherof Richard Drake, who patented land in IOW; and who in 1727 witnessed the Will of Mary Bodie.

The Crockers were almost certainly of South Petherton, where Thomas Crocker m. Charity Seagar (Sugar) on 25 May 1606, and their son, Thomas, m. Judith Fursland, 30 May 1641.

The earliest origins of these families may be found in the records of Wells Cathedral:

From the great number of benefactions and endowments received in the Middle Ages by the Vicars Choral of Wells, from the time of Bishop Ralph de Shrewsbury (A.D. 1329-63) downwards, the documents formerly in their possession must have been very numerous. However this may have been in former days, their records and archives that have survived to the present time, are comparatively few in number, except certain parchment Rolls of Account, which are still somewhat numerous. Of those that have so survived, a large proportion are so entirely decayed that they are either mouldering to dust, from the effects of damp, or are at least wholly illegible.

A long roll, finely written, containing several accounts; the Computus of the Bedel of Snersholte, A.D. 1438; the Computus of William Gyffarde, the Bedel of Sparkeforde, or Drayton Sparkeforde [near Castle Carey, in Somerset] for the same year. In this account, persons named “Henry Scarlet and “John Blake” occur.

Computus of John Benham, Warden, or Supervisor, of La Wellysleigh, A.D. 1455:— the manor, near Wells, from which the Wellesley family derives its name; no mention, however, of any member of the family is to be found in it. The Wellesley property, now known as the “Manor of Wellesley and Dulcot,” was given to the Vicars Choral by Bishop Ralph of Shrewsbury, A.D. 1354.

This is followed, on the same membrane, by the account of the same John Benham, as the Warden, or Supervisor, of La Fennes, in the same year. Among his items of expenditure, is a charge of 3s. 7d. for riding to the Sheriff, to obtain the liberation of John Russell, bailiff of Fennes, who was in the lock-up house [incluserio] at Yvelcesetre [Ilchester]. The roll concludes with the account of the same John Benham, as the Warden, or Supervisor, of La Hethorne, for the same year.

Computus of Henry Sporyer and Richard Harris, “Receivers of the moneys of the Vicars of the Cathedral Church of Wells, dwelling in the New Work” — the New Close — A.D. 1461. This is a long roll, and finely written, but in some parts illegible, from damp. William Pitte, of Wedmore, is again mentioned as a tenant, paying 70s. yearly for Chambleynshinne. They account for 4s. 4rf. received for saffron, “growing in “the common garden” this year: also, for 2s., for the dripping [pinguedine] in the kitchen; and “for 6s. 8d. “the gift of Master Hugh Sugar, Official of the Bishop “in the Consistory of Wells, as his fee on being admitted Rural Dean from the Parish Church of Kyngestone, this year.”

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DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS HARRIS, D. 1672.

1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, in Wiveliscombe, Somerset. He was a cousin of (1) Richard Bennett, Governor of Virginia, and probably he who d. in Virginia in 1672. B. 5, p. 224: Henry Baker deceased, estate dated 27 April 1701. Witnesses: Robert Lancaster Sr., Nicholas Sessoms, whose da. was Mary Blake, wife of William Blake. Richard Bennett’s first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife. The Tukes descended from a Holliman heiress. Thomas Harris, Will recorded 13 Nov. 1672. Security: John Newman and Edward Brantley. Edward Brantley Sr. came to America as an indentured servant under John Seaward of Bristol, who received a land patent on 18 June 1638 for 400 ac. in IOW. His son, Phillip Brantley, m. Joyce Lewis, da. of Thomas Lewis and Rebecca George, da. of John George, undoubtedly related to Nicholas George (see earlier notes), father-in-law of Thomas Harris, d. 1672. John George, appraisal by John Brantley, Thomas Hardy, George Riddick, and George Barlow, c. 1711. (B. 2, p. 527).
1.1. John Harris. William Groves, appraisal by John Harris, Edward Brantley, Elias Fort and Edward Grantham; presented by Mrs Elinor Groves,; recorded 9 Feb. 1678. (B. 2, p. 172). John Harris m. a da. of Francis Hobbs, who sold Edward Brantley 675 ac. adj. Thomas Tuke, in 1669. The Brantleys association with this kinship group stemmed from their marriage into the family of Hodges Council, of Wedmore, somerset. (2) Edward Bennett’s children. Christopher Reynolds Sr. emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Mr. Edward Bennett. Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, “Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds Jr. all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan (his son-in-law who m. da. Elizabeth Reynolds) now liveth upon”.

1.2. Thomas Harris.

1.2.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1730: Thomas Harris 290 ac. IOW, on the Maherin River and both sides of Herbert’s Branch adj. Edward Brantley (son of Phillip and Joyce Lewis), and William Simmons line, 24 March 1725. Edward Brantley, John Thorpe, and Thomas Purcell appraisers. Thomas names a son, Joshua, in his will, and also an “unborn child wife now goes with”. Edward Brantley’s son, John, m. the widow of Thomas Harris, Hannah Judkins, whose mother remarried to William Harris before 1721. In Jan. 1708, administration of Edward Taylor’s estate was granted to Margaret Taylor; witnesses William Gray, Timothy Thorpe, and William Harris. (Davis, 127).

Margaret Taylor (da. of Edward Taylor and Margaret Gray) and William Judkins (son of Robert Judkins) had issue: 1. Elizabeth Judkins (m. John Berryman) 2. Hannah Judkins (m. Thomas Harris, d. 1730, IOW Co., son of Thomas, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1672, and Alice Newman). Margaret Taylor m. William Harris before 1721; her son Thomas Taylor m. his granddau., Mary Harris. William Harris: his Will was probated 19 April 1721. To wife Margaret. To grandson Harris Taylor. To granddau. Mary, wife of Thomas Taylor. To grandson Harris Taylor, land purchased of Robert Girly. To granddau. Mary, land at her death to her husband Thomas Taylor. At their deaths, to their son Thomas Taylor. Friends Capt. Thomas Holt and William Gray to divide property and overseers of the will. Executor, Thomas Taylor. (W.B 7, p. 325).

Thomas Holt was the son of Randall Holt and Elizabeth Hansford, da. of of Colonel John Hansford. Thomas Holt’s first wife was Frances Mason, da. of Francis Mason , whose Will names Thomas Holt, “Son-in-law” (B. 2., p. 116). Elizabeth Mason, wife to Francis, and mother to Thos. Holt was the widow of Thomas Binns, Sr. As Mrs. Elizabeth Binns she patented 777 ac. on 18 Oct. 1669. (B. 6, p. 281) On May 6, 1701., as Elizabeth Mason, she deeded 388 ½ acres to Grandson, Francis Holt, and 388 ½ acres to grandson, Francis Mason – “if he dies, to Grandson, Charles Binns.” (Surry W&D B. 2., p. 225) Thus, Frances Mason Holt, first wife of Thomas Holt, was ½ sister to Thomas Binns (Jr). Robert Barham lived successively with Thomas Binns, Robert Hart, and Thomas Holt

1. Joseph Thorpe, m. Dorothy Fenn, da. Timothy Fenn, Sr. (Were they of the Fenn family of Wedmore, Somerset?).
1.1. Thomas Thorpe, d. 1711 in IOW Co. m. (1) bef. 1686, Martha Jennings, d. 1702, da. of John Jennings, Clerk of Court of IOW Co. and Mary Seaward. John Jennings first wife had been Martha, da. of Robert (co-incidentally named) Harris, alias Crumpe, of Quedgely, Gloucestershire. Thomas Thorpe m. (2) Mary Lewis. John Jennings: Leg.- son *John; da. Martha; da. Mary my land on Lyon’s Creek; da. Sarah the land bought of Valentine Chitty; son-in-law William Seward; George Seward, wife Mary; Overseers, Capt. Edmund Wickins, Lt. George Moore, Thomas Moore, William Seward. Date. Oct. 19, 1678. Wit: George Lewer, Mathew Wood. George Lewer.

Edward Bennett left two daus, one of whom, Mary, m (1) Thomas Bland, of London; (2) Luke Cropley. The other, Silvestra, m. Major Nicholas Hill, son of Thomas Hill and Margaret Wyke of Ninehead Flory, Somerset. Mary, a da. of the first-named da., Mary Bland-Cropley, m. James Day of IOW., and Mary, a da. of Silvestra Hill, the other da. of Edward Bennett, m. *John Jennings, son of the clerk of the same name.

Edward Bennett’s daus. were cousins of Thomas Harris, d. 1672. His chidrens’ association with the Thorpes predated the associations of the family of Thomas, d. 1688.

1.1.1. Sarah Thorpe (by first wife), m. (1) William George, son of John George, thus kin of Thomas Harris, d. 1672; (2) William Batts. As given previously, John George was probably he who was bapt. 6 Nov. 1603, in Pilton, Somerset.
1.1.2. John Thorpe, apraisee of the estate of Thomas Harris, d. 1730.
1.2. Joseph Thorpe.
1.3. Timothy Thorpe: Edward Taylor died by early 1708 in Surry Co. In Jan. 1708, administration of his estate was granted to Margaret Taylor; witnessed by William Gray, Timothy Thorpe, and William Harris. (Davis, 127).
1.3.1. John Thorpe, d. 1772 in Southampton Co.; m. Mary Matthews.
1.3.1.1. Sarah Thorpe, m. Lewis Harris.
1.3.1.2. John Thorpe, Jr., m. Martha Atkinson.
1.3.2. Timothy Thorpe, d. 13 Oct. 1763, in Southampton Co., m. Martha Peterson, who m. (2) James Jones. Martha Jones of the Parish of St Luke. Leg. – son Timothy Thorp; granddau. Mary Cock Simmons; granddau. Peggy Ridley; granddau. Rebecca Simmons, Martha Ridley, Ann Thorp, Martha Thorpe, Temperance Atherton; Polly Person and Martha Person; grandson John Thorp Richardson. Ex. son Timothy Thorp. R 12 April 1781. Wit Hardy Harris, Sally Jarrell, Sarah Hasty.
1.3.2.1. Peterson Thorpe, m. Martha Person.
1.3.2.1.1. Martha Thorpe, m. Francis Taylor.
1.3.2.2. Timothy Thorpe.
1.3.2.3. Mary Thorpe, m. James Barham; his will, proved 9 June 1792, Southampton Co, mentions da. Martha Harris and Rebecca Holliman, sons Judkins Barham, Timothy Thorp Barham; son-in-law, William Holliman.
1.3.2.3.1. Martha Barham, m. Joel Harris, son of John Harris and Avis Holleman.
1.3.2.3.1.1. Sarah Harris, m. William Middleton.
1.3.3. Mary Thorpe, m. (1) Edward Harris, son of Edward Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688.
1.3.1.1. Hardy Harris.
1.3.1.2. Lewis Harris, m. Sarah Thorpe.
1.2. Robert Thorpe.
1.2.1. Timothy Thorpe.
1.2.2. Hannah Thorpe, m. Joseph Delk, son of Roger Delk, and sister of Lucinda Delke, wife of Benjamin Lancaster, grandson of Samuel Lancaster and Elizabeth Harris, da. of John Harris, d. 1687.

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THE UNBORN CHILD OF THOMAS HARRIS, D. 1730. BY MARJORIE REAGAN:

“The unborn child was Thomas Harris who himself died in Granville County, North Carolina, intestate in 1761. Theophilus Goodwin was administrator of the 1761 estate which named Thomas’s orphan Solomon and “the widow” Harris. Much circumstantial evidence is convincing that Theophilus Goodwin was the father of Thomas’s wife. Theophilus was married to Elizabeth Wyche, a daughter of George Wyche, son of Henry Wyche.

A 1753 indenture between Thomas and Joshua Harris gives proof that both were heirs of Thomas Harris who died in 1730. The scanned pages of Southampton County, Virginia’s records are online and can be found at “Brantley Association of America, Southampton Records.” This deed is recorded in Deed Book 1, 1749-1753, pages 466-468. On January 25, 1753, Thomas Harris of Granville, North Carolina sold to Joshua Harris of Southampton County, Virginia, his (Thomas’s) part of 290 acres in Southampton “granted to Thomas Harris the elder by patent bearing date at Williamsburg the 24th day of March 1725 and by the said Thomas Harris in his last will and testament bearing the date the 25th day of December 1729 given unto Thomas Harris aforesaid and bounded as in the said patent and will is expressed including all the said Thomas Harris’s part of the said 290 acres of land containing by estimation 100 acres more or less.” Thomas Harris, legal signature. Witnesses John Person, Joshua Claud, Moses Sharp, Session Blake. The deed was proved in the Court of Southampton March 8, 1753 by the oaths of the same four men. Thomas the elder’s grant is recorded in Virginia Land Patent Book No. 12, page 440

Also, on the Brantley Association News Page is the following discovery they made about the widow Hannah Harris. “Learning after 50 years of research that Hannah who married John Brantley of Granville and Chatham Co, N.C. was the widow of Thomas Harris who died in 1730, in Granville County, N.C. We have often supposed that she was a Harris, but had no idea that instead, she had married a Harris”.

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