POYNTZ/OWSLEY/HARRIS

As some aristocratic families ‘declined. through descent to junior branches, they intersected with families who were ascending the social scale, as Poyntz to Owsley and Harris.

1. Osbert FitzPonts (perhaps).
2. Nicholas FitzPonts (perhaps).
3. Hugh Poyntz, d. 3 Henry III.
4. Hugh Poyntz, of Dodington Gloucestershire, m. Julian, niece of Robert Bardulph.
5. Hugh Poyntz, m. Heloise, sister of William Malet, of Cary Malet, Somerset.
6. Nicholas Poyntz, d. 1273.
7. Sir Hugh Poyntz, b. 1252, d. 1307, m. Margaret, da. of Sir William Pavely.
8. Nicholas Poyntz, m. (1) Elizabeth La Zouche, on January 20, 1288, in North Okenden, Essex. (2) Matild, da. of Sir John Acton, of Iron Acton, Gloucestershire.
9. Sir John Poyntz, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, ob. 1377, m. Elizabeth, da. of Sir Philip Clanvowe and Phillippa Talbot.

10. Robert Poyntz, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, 1397, m. Ruth, da. of Sir Thomas FitzNichol, of Nymphfield, Gloucestershire
11. Nicholas Poyntz, of Iron Acton, ob 1449, m. Elixabeth, da. of Thomas Mill, of Harscombe, Gloucestershire, and Juliana Le Rous.
12. John Poyntz, ob. 1507, m. Alice, da. of John Cox.
13. Sir Robert Poyntz, of Iron Acton, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, d. Nov. 4, 1520, bur. Gaunt or Mayor’s Chapel, Bristol, m. (1478) Margaret Woodville, da. of Anthony Woodville, 2nd Earl Rivers, and Gwenillian Stradling. He was knighted on Bosworth, immediately after King Richard III was killed. He was Chancellor to Catherine of Aragon.
14a. John Poyntz, b. 1484, Aderly, Gloucestershire, d. November 29, 1544. Sewer to Queen Catherine; burgess to the House of Commons for the Borough of Devizes, Wiltshire, in 1529; Justice of the Peace for Gloucestershire, 1529-1544. Shortly after adding the codicil to his will, he left with the army of Henry VIII for the invasion of France and may have died in that expedition.
15. John Poyntz, burgess of Devizes, d. 29 November, 1544, m. (1) Elizabeth Browne, da. of Sir Matthew Browne, Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, and Frideswide Guilford. (2) Margaret Saunders, da. of Nicholas Saunders.
16. William Poyntz, d. 1601, m. Elizabeth Newdigate. Her will was proved June 17, 1602. (58 Montague).
17. John Poyntz, b. December 8, 1577, Reigate, Surry, d. October 20, 1617, m. Anne Sydenham, da of John Sydenham of Nymsfield, Glouc. He d. after October 20, 1617, in Jamestown, Virginia. He was Marshall of King James I. As a result of serious differences, his wife obtained a divorce on October 31, 1613. He sold all of his property between November 1615 and October 20, 1617.
18. Newdigate Ponytz, b. November 16, 1608, d. August 4, 1643, in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, m. Sarah Foxley, da. of Francis Foxley and Mary Dryden.
19. Dorothy Poyntz, b. January 3, 1631, in Benefield, Northamptonshire, m. Rev. John Owsley, who graduated from the University of Oxford with a BA degree on June 29, 1631; and evidenced here: Trull. “An Assessmt  for £4 18s. 10d ob. per mensem for 3 moneths from the 24th of September last unto the 24th of December next made die et anno predictis by the Assessors whose names are subscribed” (arranged under Tithings). (At end: Willm. Buncombe, John Owsley, Robert Smyth:- Assessors. Subcollectors: George Durston, Henry Wyatt, Christofer Babb. Allowed by us: John Pyne, Edw. Ceely. 9 Oct. 1650. (Somerset Heritage Centre, ref. D\P\tru/23/25).
20. Thomas Owsley, b. June 11, 1658, in Stogursey, Somerset, d. October 10, 1700, Stafford Co., VA, m. Ann Harris, da. of William Harris, whose will of 1698 devised all of his land to his Owsley grandchildren. Ann Harris Owsley married (2) John West, son of Major John West.
21. Poyntz Owsley.

14b. Sir Anthony Poyntz, of Iron Acton, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, 1480-1535, m. Elizabeth Huddersfield, da. of Sir William Huddersfield, and Katherine, da. of Sir Philip Courtenay.
15b. Sir Nicholas Poyntz of Iron Acton, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, d. 1555, m. Joan Berkeley, da. of Thomas, 5th Lord Berkeley.
16b. Sir Nicholas Poyntz, of Iron Acton, Sheriff of Gloucestershire, aged 21 years on his fathers’ death, 1555. Sheriff of Gloucester in 1569. Knight of the Shire 1571. Died at Iron Acton on September 1, 1585. (Inq. p. m. 28th Elizabeth, Part 2, No. 81). He m. (4) Grissell Roberts, da. of Walter Roberts, of Glassenbury, Kent, on June 2, 1600.
17b. Nicholas Poyntz, b. 1607, d. February 11, 1650, bur. in the Savoy, Lond; matric. from Magdalen Hall, Oxon, as son of Sir John Poyntz, January 31, 1622, aet. 16. Living at Tickenham in 1646. He m. Eleanor, only child and heir of Rice Davis, of Tickenham, Som., by Mary Pitt, relict of Robert Owen (Robert ap Owen, of Abergwilli, Carmarthenshire, and a Bristol merchant), and 3rd wife of Rice (Rees) Davis. Married 1638. Mary Pitt was the mother of Robert Pitt, of Virginia. Rice Davis originated from Carmarthenshire, and was brother of “William Davies, of Carmarthenshire”, father of Richard Davis, Esq, of Tickenham, bapt. November 8, 1587, heir to his uncle, who m. Mary Owen, da. of Mary Pitt and Robert Owen, and sister of Robert Owen Jr., the very likely father of Bartholomew Owen.

The identity of Ann Harris can not be known, yet if the criteria common to these times is applied – most marriages were between people who lived within walking distance of each other, and most men married women who were 2-10 years their junior, then the following suggestion is at least plausible:

1. David Harris, bur. Aug. 25, 1597, in Stoke St Gregory, Somerset. Trull is 10 miles from Stoke St Gregory, and 10 miles from Wiveliscombe. The boundary of Aller to the south and southwest with Curry Rivel and Stoke St. Gregory is formed by the river Parrett.
1.1. William Harris, bapt. March 6, 1572, Stoke St Gregory; d. December 27, 1627; m. Mary Cely, February 3, 1595; of the family of Robert Cely: Dite v Cely. Plaintiffs: Edward Dite. Defendants: Robert Cely, Sir Henry Hawley, and Robert Poulet.Subject: tenement or fardell of land in Stoke Gregory and North Curry, Somerset. 1603-1625. (Nat Arch. ref. C 2/JasI/C17/77). He of the family of his namesake: Cely v Torey. Plaintiffs: Robert Cely of North Curry, husbandman. Defendants: Thomas Torey of Staple (Fitzpaine). Subject: Money and household goods promised by defendant on complainant’s marriage with Robygge, his daughter, and money entrusted to him. Somerset. 1538-1544. (Nat. Arch. ref. C 1/972/11).
1.1.1. Anthonie Harris, bapt. October 1, 1609, Stoke St Gregory.
1.2. John Harris.
1.2.1. William Harris, “the younger”.
1.2.1.1. William Harris.
1.2.1.1.1. Anna Harris, bapt. 14 September 14, 1660, in Stoke St Gregory, da. of “William”.

The branch to which these Harris belonged can only be assumed by on their geographical nearness to other Harris families.

Owsley genealogical enquiry should include William Owsley, vicar of Shepton Beauchamp: Owsley v Drewe. Plaintiffs: William Owsley, clerk on behalf of poor of Shepton Beauchamp. Defendants: Alice Drewe, widow, Christopher Rowswell, Agnes Cogan and John Allen. Subject: charitable bequests from William Drewe and John Cogan, Shepton Beauchamp, Somerset. 1627. (Nat. Arch. ref. C 8/61/92).

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BEAUMONT TWINES

1. Torf. According to Robert of Torigny (GND, viii. c. 37), Torf was the father of Turold and Turchetil (see also OV ii. 12). It is wrongly assumed that this Turchetil was a forefather of the Harcourts; he died childless, passing his estate to his great-nephew, Asketil (cart. Preaux, fol. 97v; CP xi. Instr., col. 201 a. d., Du Monstier, Neustria Pia, p. 522, 1663). Turold mar. Duvelina de Crepon, sister of Gunnor, the wife of ‘Duke’ Richard; they were ancestors of the Beaumont family of Pont-Audemer, and, according to Auguste le Prevost, of the Harcourts, with Turold and Duvelina being the parents of both Onfroi de Vieilles (GND vii. 1. 3.), and Turchetil. (See Ordericus, ed. Prevost, vol. i., p. 180; ii. pp. 14, 369, 370; iii. pp. 42, 229).
1.1. Turchetil.
1.2. ‘Turoldis teneri ducis pedagogus perimitur’ (Will. Gemet, VII.).
1.2.1. Hunfrid (Onfroi de Vieilles, alias Vetulis or Vaux, lord of Vieilles; a small commune in the canton of Beaumont, arrondissement of Bernay.
1.2.1.1. Roger de Beaumont; Asketil, his dapifer, being a junior kinsman. 1087-1095. Notification that “in the reign of Robert son of William king of the English, Roger de Beaumont gave, etc. The same day he gave to St. Peter, Preaux, 20 pounds of English money annually from the tithe of his revenues oversea, etc. Signa Roberti comitis de Mellent; Ricardi Wanescrot; Ricardi fiii Teoderici; Anchetilli pincerna; Willelmi Stutaville”.

1.2.1.1.1. Robert de Beaumont, Ist Earl Leicester.
1.2.1.1.1.1. Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl Leicester, founder of Garendon in 1133, to which donated his kinsmen, Hugh de Berges, and his son, Asketil.
1.2.1.2. ‘Rodbertus de Bellomonte, filius Unfredi‘. 1066-1087. Notification that “in the reign of William I. and by permission of Robert son of Humfrey de Vieilles a certain knight, Gilbert by name, having no heir, gave to St. Peter a gift of his whole inheritance, namely all that he had in the vill of Conde. Of this is witness Roger of Beaumont who with his own hand placed the gift of the said honour on St. Peter’s altar”.
1.2.1.2.1. Rogerius de Tetboldivilla. Le Prévost, Hist. of Saint-Martin du Tilleul, vol. 8: “The genealogy of the family of Thibouville is partly given by a charter of 1150, concerning Guillaume de Thibouville, first of that name. This lord is firstly mentioned in the confirmation by Henry I, in 1131, of donations from Count Galeran in favour of the Holy Trinity. It recounts: Homines comitis Mellenti: Willelmi filius Roberti (William, lord of Harcourt), Willelmi of Thibovilla, etc. Guillaume de Thibouville is precisely in the same rank among the witnesses of the confirmation by Count Galeran of a chirograph of Hugue de Meulan, his great-uncle, in favour of Saint-Wandrille: Ego Gualerannus, comes Mellenti, praescriptam donationem praedecessorum meorum concedo and hoc signo meo confirmo. Testibus: Willelmo, filio Roberti (Harcourt), and Willelmo de Teboldivili, and Roberto Bigoto, and … (Bibl. Nat., Ms 5425, 69). In these accords the lord of Thibouville occupies the first place among the vassals Guillaume d’Harcourt, who preceded him as witness, (and) was a member of the family of the lord suzerain.
Thibouville, between Neubourg and Harcourt, was the cradle of this family, probably as a result of some alliance. Fontaine la Soret, an important passage on the Risle, soon became its second settlement.
The first recorded personage of this house was called Robert. He is known only to us as the father of Roger de Thibouville: “Rogerius filius Roberti of Tetboldi Villa, Rogerius of Tetboldivilla“. This character, a contemporary of Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Meulan, left only a small number of historical records. What we know about him is nevertheless enough to constitute a magnificent illustration of the history of a Norman family: we believe that he was present at the battle of Hastings. It is not that we find his name on the very defective lists of the Norman warriors who took part in this great event; but because it seems impossible to explain in any other way the possession in England of the property of which he conceded shortly afterwards to the abbey of Bec. It is quite natural, moreover, that he should have followed in this expedition Robert de Beaumont, his contemporary, and the son of his suzerain. We can see a testimony of the relations which would have existed between them in the creation of this fief of Thibouville. Guillaume de Thibouville, who appears to have been his son, a contemporary of Count Galeran, is mentioned in a charter in favour of the priory of St. Gilles de Pont-Audemer, dated to 1150, in which he donates “Terram de Fonte”.* His son was Robert de Thibouville, one of the signatories of the treaty with the Count of Flanders, in 1197, with Amauri, his brother. *Fontaine-la-Soret.
1.2.1.2.1.1. Guillaume de Thibouville.

1.2.2. Turchetil.
1.2.2.1. Asketil (de Harcourt) de Rieu, gave the abbey of Tréport, c. 1060, the tithes of ‘decimam suam de Riu’. (Carlularium sanctae Trinilatis, p. 425). He is noted as ‘senis’, distinguishing him from his son.
1.2.2.1.1. Hugues de Rieu, confirmed his father’s gifts to Treport. At Domesday, he held Rotingedene (near Bergemere, contracted to Burg and Berges) from William de Warenne. His son, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138), m. Isabelle de Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, whose son founded Garendon.
1.2.2.1.1.1. Anscherio de Moncellis. In Easter of 1107, before the barons of king Henry, he gave witness in a dispute concerning fisheries, donated to Treport by Robert d’Eu. He may have been the Ansketil de Jorz who is recorded in England in 1110 and who (it is suggested) is synonomous with the “nobis Aschetillus dispensator” and his son “Galfridus” noted by Bridgeman (The Burton Abbey Twelfth Century Surveys, Collections for a History of Staffordshire, p. 225, 1918). Sometime during the period 1133- 48, as “Asketillus de Berges,” he gave four carucates of the land of Burton to the Abbot and Convent of St. Mary at Garendon, the charter being witnessed by Robert, Earl of Leicester, and Ives de Harcourt, who d. 1148. (B.M. MS Lansdowne 415, folios 8, 31v.).
1.2.2.1.1.1.1. Geoffrey le Despenser (‘Gaufrido dispensatore’), ‘dispensarius’ to the Earl of Chester.
1.2.2.1.1.1.1.1. Thomas le Despenser, donated to Garendon as ‘Tomas Dispensator, filius Gaufridi Dispensatoris’. (John Nichols, The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, vol. III, part 2, 1804).
1.2.2.1.2. Asketil. D.B.: The Land of the Count of Eu, Bexill Hundred: ‘Ansketil of Rieux 1/2 hide‘.

The English Harcourts:
1.2.2.1.2.1. Robert fitz Anschetil, ob. 1118 (ctl. Preaux, fol. 102v). Held Norman fiefs.
1.2.2.1.2.1.1. William fitz Robert, fl. 1149 (P.R. 31 H. 1). Granted Stanton-under-Bardon, Leic., to Garendon Abbey, founded by Robert de Beaumont (cart. Garendon, fols. 5v., 15v.).
1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1. Robert fitz William, mar. Eve Crispin, da. of baron of the Vexin Normande, Joscelin Crispin.
1.2.2.1.2.1.2. Ivo de Harcourt. He ratified the confirmation of his brother, William, of their father’s gifts to Garendon (ctl. Garendon, fol. 15v.; Nichols’ Leic. vii.). ‘In 1148, William de Harcourt, with the consent of his brother and heir, Ivo (pincerna), and mother, Agnes, alienated to Garendon the manor of Stanton-under-Bardon, which was specifically their patrimonium’ (Benjamin Thompson, Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain, p. 107, 1999). It was Ivo who was the progenitor of the English line of Harcourts.

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MORE ON THE SERGEANT

1. Thomas Harrys of Mells, carpenter, b. 1494. “Thomas Harrys”, a tenant of Glastonbury Abbey, who is recorded thus: Harrys v Dyar. Plaintiffs: Thomas Harrys. Defendants: Thomas Dyar, knight. Subject: Tenement in the late abbot of Glastonbury’s manor of Greinton. Somerset. 1544-1551. (C 1/1228/15-18).
1.1. John Harris.
1.1.1. Richard Harris, bur. Dec. 19, 1593, in Nunney.
1.1.1.1. John Harris, m. Joan Collier, July 19, 1601, in Nunney.
1.1.1.1.1. William Harris, bapt. Oct. 3, 1602, Mells. Perhaps the William who was headright of John Moone (1637) and John Seward (1648) in Isle of Wight. John Moone’s da., Sarah Moone, m. Lt. John Pitt, son of Col. Robert Pitt, the Bristol sea captain and merchant. John Moone’s da. Mary Moone, m. Thomas Green; his sister m. Anthony Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset; their son, Michael Fulgham, m. Anne Izzard, having issue: (1) Anne Fulgham, who m. Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688.
1.2. John Harris, m. Joan Stubbs, Feb. 10, 1569, in Wedmore.
1.2.1. John Harris, d. 1625, m. Penelope Millard, Sept. 9, 1611, in Wedmore. He m. (2) Christiana Thurston, bapt. 28 Oct. 1591, on Oct. 8, 1618; the great-niece of Joan Thurston, who m. (2) John Counsell, on Aug. 13, 1573.
1.2.1.1. Robert Harris. Lawne’s Creek, October 26, 1646: “James Tooke (his family were tenants of the Symes, of Mells) to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease”.
1.2.1.1.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, probably d. in 1677, in Virginia. The inventory of Edward Harris states that he owed money to “Mrs Davis”; almost cartainly the wife of John Davis, i.e. Mary Greene; da. of Thomas Greene and Mary Moone, and cousin of Martha Greene, who m. Anthony Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset, aforesaid.
1.3. William Harris (“of Glastonbury”), m. Dorothy Westbrooke, Aug. 31, 1562, at Wivelscombe, Somerset.
1.3.1. Richard Harris, m. Elianor Bennett, Oct. 8, 1594, sister of Edward Bennett, aforesaid.
1.3.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, Nov. 20, 1623.
1.3.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, died in Virginia in 1672, second-cousin of Governor Richard Bennet, whose first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’).
1.3.1.1.2. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624; probably d. 1687, Virginia, m. Unity.
1.1.2. John Harris. Held land in Aller, of the manor of Greinton.
1.1.2.1. Thomas Harris bapt. Feb. 3, 1582; “son of John”.
1.1.2.2. Sergeant John Harris, bapt. Oct. 1, 1587, bur. Aug. 3, 1637, in Nunney, m. Dorothy Collier, bapt. Jan. 26, 1594, in Nunney, da. of Joseph Collier, Rector of Nunney, and sister of George, Rector of Nunney in 1635.
The principal applicants for the manor of Nunney, post-dissolution, were Thomas and John Horner, who in 1543, 22nd May, sent in their valuation for the Manor of Nunney, part of the possessions of the “attainted” Monastery of Glastonbury. The Crown still held some rents (the advowson) in Nunney, and these, “in consideration of the good, and faithful and acceptable services of our loving servant, Edward Dyar, Esq.”, son of Sir Thomas Dyar, aforesaid, landlord of the Harris family in Gtreinton, and the grantor of the Church living at Nunney to Joseph Collier, to whom, as the norm for these times, he was probably related. (See Liber Institutionem, First Fruits, New Series, Vol. II., 1876).
The intermarriage of the Horners and Symes families brought about the prosperity of the latter
1.1.2.2.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. Oct. 8, 1615, in Othery, juxta Greinton, son of a John Harris “of Aller”, 6 miles from Greinton, and three miles from Othery. He d. in 1677, having m. Alice West, in 1635, in Nunney (married by his br.-in-law), da. of William West (of Nunney) and Katharin Perry, who m. on May 23, 1608, in Bath (18 miles from Nunney); their da., Alice, being bapt. Sept. 16, 1615, in Bath. It was common practice to marry in the parish of a prosperous God-parent/in-law. Thomas Harris returned to Nunney with his father, before returning to Virginia.
1.1.2.2.1.1. Thomas Harris. bapt. Aug. 14, 1636, in Nunney, d. 1688. John Seward, the Bristol sea captain and merchant, held land in Somerset at Hemington, which is 4 miles fom Mells/Nunney, and named one land grant in Virginia “New Hemington.” (Tyler, Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography). Thomas Harris settled on land that had been John Sewards. The Will of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, was witnessed by John Coggin, of Bristol. John Seward patented land in 1638: “Upon Warresquioke River. Beginning at a pynie pint by a little gutt running into the woods right over against the land of Nathaniell Floyd* and near his former pattent. “Francis Hobbs’ now wife Mary was former wife of Nathaniel Floyd deceased”. Francis Hobbs’ da. was the wife of John Harris, son of Thomas Harris, who died in 1672. Francis Hobbs Jr. left a legacy to “cousin John Davis”.
1.1.2.2.1.1.1. William Harris, m. Mary Short, grandda. of William Short, whose land had been granted to Robert Moseley on Jan. 7, 1649, and then assigned to William Short Sr., on Oct. 28, 1657. (See Tidewater Families of Virginia, p. 544). This was the land identified as adjoining that of Sergeant John Harris: lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Moseleys, adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry Co. from Charles Cittie County. Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings’. (Dated Oct. 4, 1660. Surry Co. Court Records. R. November 10, 1660). William Short Sr. was likely to have been he born June 29, 1626, at Mells, with sons, Thomas, bapt. May 23, 1654, and William, bapt. March 30, 1658.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2. Robert Harris, m. Anne Fulgham, da. of Michael Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset. Susannah Fulgham, Anne’s sister, m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council and Lucy Hardy.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1. Edward Harris, Will pr. March 25, 1734.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1.1. Nathan Harris.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1.2. West Harris.
1.1.2.2.1.2. John Harris, baptised in 1640. He married Margaret Beard in 1664.
1.1.2.2.1.2.1. John Harris, baptised June 24, 1667. (It can not be discounted that emigrated to Virginia with his cousins).
1.1.2.2.2. Dorothy Harris, m. John Baker, a transportee of Mr. George Menefee, in James City Co., in 1635. George Menefee’s Will, dated December 31, 1645, named Overseers as “friends Captain Peter Andrews, and Richard Bennett, Esq.”; the latter’s land being adjacent to his. The Menefees were a Devonshire family, who like many (the Pitts etc.) were drawn to the trading opportunities afforded by Bristol. (See Will of Elizabeth Minifee, Widow of Bristol. PROB 11/126/446. November 15, 1615).
John Baker was probably he who was bapt on March 14, 1616, in West Cranmore, Somerset, 5 miles from Nunney, brother of William; sons of Matthew. “John Baker, 650 acs. Chas. City Co., 20 Nov. 1637, p. 497. 150 acs. E. upon Causons field Cr. N. upon Appamattock Riv., towards the Citty Cr. W. & S. into the maine woods; & S. up along the Citty Cr. 50 due in right of his first wife Priscilla Palmer, 50 acs. by deed of gift from his Mother in Law Jone Palmer 2 Jan 1633 & 550 acs due for his own per. adv. the per. adv. of his late wife Alice, of his wife Dorothy & for trans. of 8 persons”. Joane Daniell was bapt. March 4, 1581, and m. Thomas Palmer on April 28, 1597, in East Brent, Somerset, 10 miles from Greinton.

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COLLAVILLA

1. Gilbert Crispin I., held the border fortress of Tillieres as vassal of Gilbert de Brionne. He m. Gunnora d’Anet (I suggest), which would answer M. Le Prevost’s statement that there was an apparent association between the Crispin and FitzOsborn family, without the basis of that association being known. (‘Ordericus Vitalis’, ed. le Prevost et. al., p. 398, 1840). Gunnora d’Anet was the da. of Fulk d’Anet, from the vil of Anet, south of Ivry, son of a sister of Osborn de Crépon, who married Emma, da. of Raoul d’Ivri (Count Rodolph), uterine brother of Duke Richard I.
1.1. Hesilia Crispin, m. William Malet (Monasticon 3.405). His caput was Graville-sur-Honorine, near Le Havre, which had previously formed part of the Giffards barony, centred on Montvilliers.
1.1.1. Robert Malet, held the fief of Collavilla, near Harfleur, Seine-Inf. (Held by Jean Malet in 1349; see Revue historique de la noblesse, vol. 2, p. 392, 1841). “La route de Fécamp à Valmont, et celle de Valmont à Fécamp, en passant par Colleville, le Bec de Mortagne, pour l’aller, et pour le retour par Guerheville et Daubeuf” (Journal pour tous”, vol. xi., 1862). Domesday shows “Gilbert de Colavilla” as a considerable undertenant of Robert Malet at Rendlesham; he also held under Robert Malet’s mother, Hesilia Crispin (DB/Sf 6/19-21, 29-30, 34-37, etc.).
1.1.2. Gilbert Malet, among the few who were spared by the Danes sacking of York.
1.2. Gilbert Crispin II., alias Colavilla, held the border fortress of Damville as vassal of Richard de Clare, son of Gilbert de Brionne, and brother of Baldwin de Clare. A charter (undated) of Henry II. confirmed the gifts to Bec made by Baldwin de Clare, and his assent to the gifts of (1) Fulk d’Anet and his sister, Albreda; (2) William Crispin, who donated tithes of Druecort; (3) Roger, son of Richard de Clare, who donated tithes of “Colleville“; and (4) William Malet, who donated tithes of Conteville. (See Mon. Ang. II., 953). Fulk d’Anet and his sister, Albreda, donated tithes of “Mesnillo Simonis” to Bec. That is, “Fulconis de Aneto”, not d’Anou. Gilbert Crispin I’s vassal, William Pacy, held land in Mesnil Simon.
1.3. William Crispin, alias Colleville, held Druecort in Normandy. “Le nombre de fiefs relevant de l’église de Fécamp était considérable, et les possesseurs de fiefs rendaient foi et hommage à l’abbaye et s’obligeaient à lui appartenir, à défendre ses intérêts en toutes choses, à se réunir trois et quatre fois par an aux hommes de l’abbé, pour aller au besoin au delà de la Seine et des mers, venger les injures et les torts faits à l’église de Fécamp. Au reste, le service militaire était obligatoire non-seulement pour les vassaux de l’abbaye, mais encore pour les moines et pour l’abbé, qui devait se trouver à toutes les prises d’armes à la tête de ses hommes.11 était porté sur les rôles du ban et de l’arrièreban, et Fallue rapporte qu’au combat de Bouvines, on vit les abbés de Fécamp combattre auprès des Estouteville, des Guillaume Crépin et des Robert Malet” (Henri Gourdon de Genouillac, Histoire de l’abbaye de Fécamp, p. 122, 1875). According to Dudo, Richard I was born at Fécamp; and was buried in the Abbey he founded there, along with his sons, Robert and Richard II.

Some of the Norman elite can be identified when the method by which they formed familial associations is understood – “Foedus inter consobinos heredes” – inheritance (and close tenurial association) passing down non-consanguineous lines of cousins; a necessary element of colonisation in a hostile environment.

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THE CRISPIN ENTITY

As in the colonisation of Virginia by English settlers, the colonisation of England by Norman settlers was achieved by the transplantation of kinship groups.

The Norman elite’s control of England was through a ‘mesh’ of interrelated families; a form of familial chain-mail, that gave protection against a hostile environment. Essentiially, neighbours in Normandy became such in England.

Of such neighbours were the Crispins (alias Colville) and the Percys. Milo Crispin, the former family’s ‘historian’, stated that they were of “noble origin”. They were also entrusted with the defence of Normandy, being governors of various border forts.

The protection of Normandy would have only been given to members of the ducal family.

One possibility is that Gilbert Crispin I. was an illigitimate son of Gilbert de Brionne; another, that they were cousins.

1. Richard, ‘the Great Prince’. About the year 980, Richard, duke of Normandy, gave Brionne to one of his natural children, named Godefroy, which included the territories of Bonneville and Bec. After the death of Richard, a brother of Godefroy, born like himself a concubine, Guillaume, Count of Exmes, revolted against his elder brother. Raoul d’Ivry, uncle of the brothers, was charged to end the rebellion, and captured Guillaume in Exmes, bringing him to Rouen, under the guard of Turquetil de Harcourt. (See Charpillon, Dict., Hist., p. 584, 1868). Thus, Godefroy d’Eu held the barony of Bonneville-sur-le-Bec.
1.1. Godefroy d’Eu, cousin of Emma d’Ivri, wife of Osborn de Crepon. Guillaume of Jumièges records that a sister married Osmund de Conteville. Their son was Foulques d’Anet. Gilbert Crispin I. married his daughter, thus explaining Prevost’s statement that there was an obvious connection between the FitzOsborns, decendants of Osborn de Crepon, and the Crispins, without its basis being known.
1.1.1. Heloise, m. Ansgot. Heloise received Bonneville as dower.
1.1.1.1. Herluin de Bec. Educated in the household of Gilbert de Brionne. Hellouin founded the Abbey of Bec toward the 37th. year of his life, i.e. 1034. ‘His father, Ansgot, derived his origin from those Danes who first conquered Normandy, and his mother was closely related to the dukes of Flanders. Gilbert, Count of Brionne, grandson of Richard I., Duke of Normandy, by his son, Prince Godefroy, had Herluin brought up by him, and particularly cherished him among all the lords of his court’. (See Francois Guizot, Collection des mémoires relatifs à l’histoire de France, p. 146, 1826). ‘Hellouin, in the presence of his two brothers, Odo and Roger, gave to Bec the third part belonging to him from his land of Bonneville, and his lands of Petit-Quevilli, Seine-Inférieure, and Surci, Eure, as well as the land of Cernai-sur-Orbec, Calvados’. (See W. Genet, t. xi, p. 35). This charter dates to c. 1035.
1.1.2. Gilbert de Brionne.

1.2. Guillaume d’Eu, m. Lesseline, sister of Turquetil de Harcourt.
1.2.1. Gilbert Crispin I, cousin of Gilbert de Brionne, m. a daughter of Foulques d’Anet. Gilbert Crispin held the fortress of Tillieres under the ducal family as a vassal of Gilbert de Brionne.
1.2.1.1. Gilbert Crispin II., held the fortress of Damville as a vassal of Gilbert de Brionne’s son, Richard FitzGilbert (de Clare). The military prowess of the Crispins was well esteemed: ‘And like the Fabii, or the Anicii or Manlii, carried the tokens of fame (insignia) among the Romans, so the Crispins knew even greater fame among the Normans and the French’. (Milo Crispin, How The Holy Virgin Appeared To William Crispin The Elder And On The Origin Of The Crispin Family, ed. Migne, cols. 735-744, 1856).
1.2.1.1.1. Gilbert Crispin III., m. Hersende de Brezolles, kinswoman of Albert Ribaut, and became enfeoffed in Armentières-sur-Avre.
1.2.1.1.2. Robert de d’Armentières, held Whatton of Gilbert de Gaunt. Hence the family of Wormley.
1.2.1.2. William Crispin 1. Hence the family of Stanhope.  Some members of which  acknowledge a common origin with the Wormleys, based on a consideration of all the evidence at our disposal.
1.2.1.2.1. William Crispin 11., an Anglo-Norman lord, who held land in Wetherby, Wheldrake, Coxwold, and Goodmanham in Yorkshire, and in Ancroft in Northumberland, as mesne-tenant of William de Percy. The Colvville/Percy connection was repeated in Scotland, where Philip de Colville was successor to Henry and Geoffrey de Percy at Heiton, Roxburghshire. (G. W. S. Barrow. The Anglo-Norman era in Scottish History, 1980). William de Percy was from Perci-en-Auge, Calvados, arr. Lisieux, cant. Mezidon. Lisieux was the caput of this branch of the Crispin family. As a vassal of the family of d’Eu, William de Percy donated to St Pierre-sur-Dives, founded by Lesseline de Harcourt, Countess d’ Eu, after the death of her husband (par Torigni). St Pierre-sur-Dives was built on the land land of Stigand de Mezidon. Some sort of familial connection between him and William de Percy may be presumed.

William de Percy, d. 1096, m. Emma, a da. of Hugh de Port; their son was Alan de Percy, who m. Emma de Gaunt, da. of Gilbert de Gaunt; their son, William, was the father of a namesake, who m. Adeliza de Clare, descendant of Gilbert de Brionne.

1.3. Robert d’Everux, Archbishop of Rouen.
1.3.1. Richard d’Evreux, m. (after 1040), as her second husband, Godechildis, widow of Roger de Tosny. (W. Genet, Liber vii., iv., p. 269).
1.3.1.1. William d’Evreux.
1.3.1.2. Agnes d’Evreux. Orderic records that ‘Radulfus filius Rogerii de Toenia’ kidnapped ‘Agnetem uterinam sororem suam, Ricardi Ebroicensium comitis filiam’ and married her to ‘Simoni de Monteforti’, brother-in-law of William Crispin I, son of Gilbert Crispin I.

1.4. Richard II.
1.4.1. Eleanor, m. Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, whose first wife Otgiva was a sister of Giselle, who was probably the mother of Gilbert de Gaunt.

We may never be able to determine which particular streams flowed into the genealogical river, but the pattern of Norman cohesion based on interrelated families at least identifies the river.

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HARRIS REVISIONS

The Harris family of Nunney, Somerset, were synonomous with their namesakes at adjoining Mells. This is evidenced by a deed of the Whitchurch family, which descibes property in Nunney being tenanted by “Harris of Mells”. (Nunney deeds, ref. DD\BR\ls/8).

1. Thomas Harrys of Mells, carpenter, b. 1494. Depositions as to the late abbot of Glastonbury (Somerset) taken at Wells (Somerset) before Nicholas Fitzjames esq and John Mawdleyn’ gent, king’s surveyors.Thomas Harrys of Mells, carpenter, 50, deposes that the tenement and mills were in great decay, and that for his labour he received £7 from Burges. He also received £10 for repairing the grist mill. (Nat. Arch., ref. E 135/2/32). “Thomas Harrys”, a tenant of Glastonbury Abbey, who is recorded thus: Harrys v Dyar. Plaintiffs: Thomas Harrys. Defendants: Thomas Dyar, knight. Subject: Tenement in the late abbot of Glastonbury’s manor of Greinton. Somerset. 1544-1551. (C 1/1228/15-18). In 1545, the manor was granted to Sir Thomas Dyer, d. 1565. The John Horner who came to possess the Manor of Mells, a village near Frome, 6 WSW. of Glastonbury, was not his namesake who was steward to the late Abbot of Glastonbury, though undoubtedly related. The intermarriage of the Symes with the Horners brought them much land, and brought about their lordship of the Fulgham family at Pitminster.

1.1. John Harrys, witnessed a Will in 1554 concerning Mells.
1.1.1. Richard Harris, bur. Dec. 19, 1593, in Nunney.
1.1.1.1. Richard Harris, bapt. Aug. 24, 1589, m. Edith Burges, Jan. 14, 1607, in Nunney.
1.1.1.2. John Harris, m. Joan Collier, July 19, 1601, in Nunney.
1.1.1.2.1. William Harris, bapt. Oct. 3, 1602, Mells. Perhaps the William who was headright of John Moone (1637) and John Seward (1648) in Isle of Wight. John Moone’s da., Sarah Moone, m. Lt. John Pitt, son of Col. Robert Pitt, the Bristol sea captain and merchant. John Moone’s da. Mary Moone, m. Thomas Green; his sister m. Anthony Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset; their son, Michael Fulgham, m. Anne Izzard, having issue: (1) Anne Fulgham, who m. Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688. (2) Susannah Fulgham, who m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council Jr. and Lucy Hardy, in 1705. The Hodges and Council families were of Wedmore, Somerset, 20 miles from Nunney, on the main east/west road; a connection made more close by the intermarriages of the leading families of each place into the same families (Bluets, etc.).

1.1.2. John Harris, m. Joan Stubbs, Feb. 10, 1569, in Wedmore.
1.1.2.1. John Harris, d. 1625, m. Penelope Millard, Sept. 9, 1611, in Wedmore. He m. (2) Christiana Thurston, bapt. 28 Oct. 1591, on Oct. 8, 1618; she was the great-niece of Joan Thurston, who m. (2) John Counsell, on Aug. 13, 1573.
1.1.2.1.1. Robert Harris. Lawne’s Creek, October 26, 1646: “James Tooke (his family were tenants of the Symes, of Mells) to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease”.
1.1.2.1.1.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, probably d. in 1677, in Virginia. The inventory of Edward Harris states that he owed money to “Mrs Davis”; almost cartainly the wife of John Davis, i.e. Mary Greene; da. of Thomas Greene and Mary Moone, and cousin of Martha Greene, who m. Anthony Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset, aforesaid. In IOW Court, January 11, 1672, Thomas Tooke (associated with Thomas Harris, who died in 1672), as attorney, calls John Davis “his loving brother”.

The family of Thurston were established at Thornbury, Gloucestershire, along the south bank of the Bristol Estuary. As the Bridger family, they held land in Woodmancote. Edward Thurston, of Thornbury, in Chancery Proceedings, 1636, is recorded as being the husband of Judith Gwatkins, da. of William Gwatkins. In Virginia, James Bland, of Prince William Co., m. Mary Gwatkins. He was the son of Theodorick Bland and Margaret Mann, who was probably related to Elizabeth Mann: ‘Thomas Mann and wife Elizabeth Mann to Theophilus Joyner (neph. of Bridgeman, a guardian of an orphan of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, 150 acres on Blackwater River and bounded by William Mayo, Bridgeman Joyner and Hodges Counsell, Wit: William Mayo and Richard Booth. Rec. June 9, 1683. Theodorick Bland was the son of Theodorick Bland and Anne Bennett, b. 1641, da. of Governor Richard Bennett. (PROB 11/351/440: Will of Richard Bennett of Nansemond River, Virginia. August 3, 1676). Richard Bennett was a son of Thomas Bennett, d. 1616, in Wivelscombe, Somerset, and a nephew of (1) Edward Bennett, bapt. 2 Feb. 1577, in Wivelscombe, later of of St Olave, Southwark, London, and Lawn’s Creek, Virginia, father of Alice Bennett, who m. John Hardy. Nugent, C&P vol. 1, p. 569: Mr. John Hardie 1150 acres IOW Co., 5 June 1666. Beginning at upper corner tree of Mathew Tomlins old land, running SSE by Wm. Westwrayers land &c. SW on Mathew Tomlins new land. Their daus. m., respectively, Hodges Counsell, and Richard Jackson, whose da. Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, who patented 500 acres on July 17, 1648 ‘lying on east side of Lawne’s Creek extending to main river and along the great river to the creek dividing the same from land of Alice Bennett’. George Hardy was an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677.

1.2. William Harris (“of Glastonbury”), m. Dorothy Westbrooke, Aug. 31, 1562, at Wivelscombe, Somerset.
1.2.1. Richard Harris, m. Elianor Bennett, Oct. 8, 1594, sister of Edward Bennett, aforesaid.
1.2.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, Nov. 20, 1623.
1.2.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, died in Virginia in 1672, second-cousin of Governor Richard Bennet, whose first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke (of Barwick, Somerset, whose family were tenants of the Symes family) overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife.
1.2.1.1.2. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624; probably d. 1687, Virginia, m. Unity.

1. Robert Bennett, a tanner, of Wivelscombe, Somerset, m. Elizabeth Edney.
1.1. Thomas Bennett, d. 1616, Wivelscombe, m. Ann Spicer.
1.1.1. Thomas Bennett, b. Nov. 11, 1603 at Wiveliscombe; m. Agnes Beard, July 17, 1623.
1.1.1.1. Alice Bennett, m. John Hardy.
1.2.1.1. Lucy Hardy, m. Hodges Council.
1.2.1.1.1. Lucy Hardy, m. Hodges Council.
1.1.1.2. … Bennett, m. Richard Jackson, who patented 450 acres in IOW adjacent to Justinian Cooper.
1.1.1.2.1. Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy.
1.1.2. Richard Bennett, b Aug. 6, 1609, Wiveliscombe, d. 1675, Virginia; his Will bequesting: “To William Yearret of Pagan Creek and to the wife of Mr. Thomas Taberer, to each of them two thousand pounds of tobacco”. *His da. Ruth m. John Numan (brother-in-law to Thomas Harris, d. 1672). Robert Spencer married Taberer’s sister, Ann. Richard Bennett’s bequest to “the wife of Mr. Thomas Taberer” was probably to a sister or cousin. The Will of John George, recorded Jan. 9, 1678, names friend Thomas Taberer as exec. John Dalton was transp. by Nicholas George & Thomas Taberer & Humphry Clarke. Thomas Harris, d. 1672, m. a da. of Nicholas George, as first wife. “Know all men present that I Thomas Harris (aforesaid) ine th county of IOW for many considerable caused me thereunto moving have and do by the srest constitie and ordeyne my be beloved friend Mr. Thomas Culmore of the county of Surry my true and lawfully attorney for me and to my ame and use to ask leavy recover of receive of Robert Spencer of the County of Surry all such somes of tobacco as shall appear due unto me within the county aforesaid”. (Surry Co. D.B. 1, p 149).
1.1.2.1. Ann Bennett, m. Theoderick Bland.
1.2. Edward Bennett. Christopher Reynolds Sr. emigrated to Virginia as an indentured servant of Edward Bennett. Bk. 1, pp. 46-8, “Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Reynolds Jr. all my land on the southerly side of the Freshest swamp that Richard Jordan (his son-in-law who m. da. Elizabeth Reynolds) now liveth upon”. The grandson of Christopher Reynolds, Richard Reynolds, m. Elizabeth Sharpe, the da. of Richard Sharpe Sr., br. of John Reynolds, whose Will bequested to Robert Driver, whose dau, Elizabeth, m. Giles Driver, headright of Thomas Harris, d. 1672. Giles Driver m. (2) Olive Hardy, da. of John Hardy and Alice Bennett, da. of Edward Bennett aforesaid; brother-in-law of Richard Harris. Giles Driver’s son, Charles Driver m. Prudence Pitt, da. of John Pitt and Olive Hardy, probable sister of George Hardy, who witnessed the Will of Edward Harris, d. 1677. John Hardy m. 2. Alice Tucker, widow of Arthur Allen. Richard Reynolds and Will Bradshaw witnesses to will of Giles Driver (son-in-law of John Hardy), proved 28 December 1676. (D.B. 2, p. 147). The Reynolds family were probally of Chedzoy, 30 miles from Nunney, 12 miles from Glastonbury, where Joan Reynolds m. Richard Coggan, on June 28, 1627, and Mary Coggan m. Thomas Bond, on Oct. 28, 1632.

1.3. Elianor Bennett, bapt. Mar. 5, 1567, m. Oct. 7, 1594 Richard Harris, son of William Harris, who m. Dorothy Westbrooke, Aug. 31, 1562, at Wivelscombe.
1.3.1.Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, Nov. 20, 1623, at Wivelscombe.
1.3.1.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1672.
1.3.1.1.1. John Harris m. a da. of Francis Hobbs, who sold Edward Brantley 675 ac. adj. Thomas Tuke, in 1669. Edward Brantley Sr. came to America as an indentured servant under John Seward of Bristol who received a land patent on 18 June 1638 for 400 ac. in IOW.
1.3.1.1.2. Thomas Harris. (The supposition that he was the Thomas who d. in 1688 can not be discounted).
1.3.1.1.2.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1730: Thomas Harris 290 ac. IOW, on the Maherin River and both sides of Herbert’s Branch adj. Edward Brantley (son of Phillip and Joyce Lewis), and William Simmons line, 24 March 1725. Edward Brantley, John Thorpe, and Thomas Purcell appraisers. Edward Brantley’s son, John, m. the widow of Thomas Harris, Hannah (probably) Judkins.
1.3.1.2. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624; probably d. 1687, Virginia, m. Unity.
1.3.1.2.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of her 2nd husband, Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710.
1.3.1.2.2. John Harris. On Nov. 9, 1708, Samuel Lancaster was granted the administration of the estate of John Harris, his brother-in-law. The Lancasters were the squires of Cheddar, juxta Wedmore.

1.1.2. John Harris,
1.1.2.1. Thomas Harris bapt. Feb. 3, 1582; “son of John”.
1.1.2.2. Sergeant John Harris (it may be presumed), bapt. Oct. 1, 1587, bur. Aug. 3, 1637, in Nunney. A possible connection between the Harris family of Nunney and Sergeant John Harris concerns Francis Derrick, the Bristol Merchant, noted in 1635 as paying custom duties on booty taken fron Spanish ships (Nat. Arch., ref. E 134/12Chas1/Mich39). Like many Bristol merhants, he held land in Somerset, as noted on this certificate of residence: “showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in the hundreds of Brent, Bempstone, Portbury, and Hartcliffe, Somerset, the previous area of tax liability. 1628. (Nat. Arch., ref. E 115/128/37).
1.1.2.2.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. Oct. 8, 1615 (in Othery juxta Greinton, whence the family holding, yet noted in the register as a son of a John Harris “of Aller”, 6 miles from Greinton, who is not recorded in the Aller registers), d. 1677, m. Alice West, in 1635, in Nunney, where a family of West were established. William West m. Katharin Peare (Perry?) on May 23, 1608, in Bath (18 miles from Nunney); their dau. being Alice West, bapt. Sept. 16, 1615. It was a common practice for marriages to take place in such ‘regional’ churches as Bath, especially if a rich relative (Godparent) lived there; a consideration of ample proportion.
1.1.2.2.1.1. Thomas Harris. bapt. Aug. 14, 1636, in Nunney, d. 1688. John Seward, the Bristol sea captain and merchant, held land in Somerset at Hemington, which is 4 miles fom Mells/Nunney, and named one land grant in Virginia “New Hemington.” (Tyler, Encyclopedia of Virginia Biography). Thomas Harris settled on land that had been John Sewards. April 27, 1686: Matthew Tomlin 1227 ac., lower par. IOW Co. on borders of Blackwater, 781 ac. being part of 1200 ac. granted to Mr. John Seward, 16 April 1648; 448 acres being waste adj.; beg. at a br. dividing land of John Turner and his daughter Marie’s, by William Westray, adj. Mary Turner, and Thomas Harris (d. 1688), to the bottom of Pig Neck; transp. of 9 persons. (B 7, p. 510). The Will of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, was witnessed by John Coggin, of Bristol. Abstract. Power of Atty. 25 Aug. 1658. Major John Harper Capt Thomas Morgan and Robt Dessell, Citizens of the City of Bristol to John Cogan of the City of Bristol ‘but now resident in Virginia aforesd chirugeon, to receive certain properties belonging to Margaret Bird. Whereas Margarett Bird of the sd Citty of Bristoll widd (admr’ix of the goods and chattells that were of Capt Richd Bond late dec’d some-times of the Citty of Bristoll but dyed in the Countrey of Virginia) hath constituted and appointed as her attorneys concerning the mill plantacon stock goods merchandizies and debts w’ch were off the sd Capt Rich’d Bond as may apper’e.’ Wit: Richard Price, John Osborne, Francis Yeamans Junr. Rec 31 Janry 1658. (The Bond family, to repeat, were of Pitminster, Somerset, as the Fulghams, and tenants of the Symes (Sims) family of Mells.

John Seward da., Margaret (Seward) Edwards, m. John Edwards, on Jan. 28, 1633, in the Temple Church, Bristol. Alice Edwards, was a headright of John Seward in 1648 (IOW). The Will of Mary Pitt “of the parish of St. Thomas within the city of Bristol, widow”, mother of Robert Pitt of Virginia, proved Nov. 25, 1634, bequested to her grandchild, the said “John Edwards a silver beer bowl”. (His br., William Edwards, also received a bequest).

John Seward patented land in 1638: “Upon Warresquioke River. Beginning at a pynie pint by a little gutt running into the woods right over against the land of Nathaniell Floyd* and near his former pattent. “Francis Hobbs’ now wife Mary was former wife of Nathaniel Floyd deceased”. Francis Hobbs’ da. was the wife of John Harris, son of Thomas Harris, who died in 1672. Francis Hobbs Jr. left a legacy to “cousin John Davis”, and “brother John Harris”; his Will being recorded on June 9, 1688.

Adam Sims, who m. Elizabeth Walton, da. of George Walton of Brunswick Co., and who was, thus, the brother-in-law of Nathan Harris, grandson of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and br. of West Harris, was very likely a descendant of Sir John Symes, of Mells, who m. Amy, the da. of Thomas Horner esq., lord of Nunney. As repeated herein, the Symes family’s tenants included such families as the Bonds and Fulghams.

1.1.2.2.1.1.1. William Harris, m. Mary Short, grandda. of William Short (br. of Thomas, of Cabin Point, Surry). He originally lived in Charles City Co., on the south side of the James River (later Prince George County); he repatented 1100 acres ‘above the head of Chippokes Creek about one and one-half miles up the western most branche’, identifying himself as ‘the son and heir of William Shorts’. The land had been granted to Robert Moseley on Jan. 7, 1649, and then assigned to William Short Sr., on Oct. 28, 1657. (See Tidewater Families of Virginia, p. 544). This was the land identified as adjoining that of Sergeant John Harris: ‘William Lea and Alice (Feltham), his wife, to William Heath, 150 acres (gifted to william Harris, grandson of William Short Jr., “tract of land 150 acres where his father now liveth”) formerly Thomas Felton’s, deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Moseleys, adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry Co. from Charles Cittie County … one hundred and fifteen acres of said land lyeth in Charles Cittie County adjoining unto the rest of the divident which lyeth in said surry County. Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings’. (Dated Oct. 4, 1660. Surry Co. Court Records. R. November 10, 1660). William Short Sr. was likely to have been he born June 29, 1626, at Mells, with sons, Thomas, bapt. May 23, 1654, and William, bapt. March 30, 1658.

1.1.2.2.1.1.2. Robert Harris, m. Anne Fulgham, da. of Michael Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset. Susannah Fulgham, Anne’s sister, m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council and Lucy Hardy.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1. Edward Harris, Will pr. March 25, 1734.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1.1. Nathan Harris.
1.1.2.2.1.1.2.1.2. West Harris.
1.1.2.2.1.1.3. Thomas Harris. On March 3, 1690, He petitioned that John Echols be summoned to the next court, perhaps to claim against the surviving executor of his grandfather’s estate. He was probably the Thomas Harris he who made a deposition in 1692 that he was then 25 years old. (B. 1, p. 52).

1.1.2.2.1.2. John Harris, baptised in 1640. He married Margaret Beard in 1664.
1.1.2.2.1.2.1. John Harris, baptised June 24, 1667. (It can not be discounted that emigrated to Virginia with his cousins).
1.1.2.2.1.3. Ann Harris, baptised October 21, 1646, who married Robert Millard, in May 1667; he baptised September 11, 1625, in Nunney, the son of Francis Millard. The Millards were primarily of Wedmore (20 miles from Nunney), where they intermarried with the Harris family of that place. The wife of the John Harris may have been related to the wife of Thomas Bennett, baptised on November 11, 1603, at Wiveliscombe; who married Agnes Beard, on July 17, 1623.

Thus, the shared associations (considerable) of Thomas Harris, died 1672, and his namesake, who died in 1688, were perhaps the result of cousins of whatever distant degree intermarrying into the same families, and sharing their associations. This point seems vital in any discussion of relationships between such as they – the distance of consanguinity being disguised by shared intermarriages.

1.1.2.3. Richard Harris.
1.1.2.3.1. Mary Harris, bapt. Aug. 1624, m. Jeffrey Coomes (Comer) 8 Nov. 1660, Nunney. (1. John Counsell, bapt. 1573. 1.1. John Counsell, bapt Nov. 28, 1601, married Mary Coomer, on Nov. 26, 1631; the sister of Agnes Coomer, who married John Harris in the adj. parish of Cheddar, in Feb. 1635; uncle of Thomas Harris, bapt. Dec. 31, 1637, in Cheddar and Edward Harris, also bapt. there. (It can not be discounted that this branch of the Harris family were of the pioneering stock of Virginia).
1.1.2.3.2. William Harris, Dec. 9, 1627, in Nunney. (It can not be discounted that he emigrated to Virginia with his cousins).
1.1.2.3.3. Sedwell Harris, bapt. June 14, 1629, in Nunney.
1.1.2.3.4. Melior Harris, bapt. Aug. 17, 1634, in Nunney. Some Harris intermarriage with the Mellor/Melior family can be supposed, as in these other instances: Farewell v Grymes. Plaintiffs: John Farewell and Melior Farewell his wife. Defendants: William Grymes. Subject: property in Nunney, Somerset. 1622. (C 3/348/19). Baker v Pryor. Plaintiffs: Melior Baker, widow. Defendants: George Pryor, Anne Pryor his wife and John Pryor. Subject: personal estate of John Baker, Middlezoy, Somerset. 1668. (C 8/240/37). Seward v Coles. Plaintiffs: Richard Seward. Defendants: Melior Coles, widow, Robert Puddy and John Mitchell. Subject: property in Langport, Somerset. 1679. (C 8/240/37).
1.1.2.2.2. Dorothy Harris, m. John Baker, a transportee of Mr. George Menefee, in James City Co., in 1635. George Menefee’s Will, dated December 31, 1645, named Overseers as “friends Captain Peter Andrews, and Richard Bennett, Esq.”; the latter’s land being adjacent to his. The Menefees were a Devonshire family, who like many (the Pitts etc.) were drawn to the trading opportunities afforded by Bristol. (See Will of Elizabeth Minifee, Widow of Bristol. PROB 11/126/446. November 15, 1615.

John Baker was probably he who was bapt on March 14, 1616, in West Cranmore, Somerset, 5 miles from Nunney, brother of William; sons of Matthew.

A collection of cousins. The highly interbred kinship group from whence they came makes a distant relationship appear more close in terms of DNA analysis. They spoke a Somerset dialect that none outside its perimeter would have understood, and were adept at all forms of farming, metalwork, and woodwork. They made strong “zider” and Cheddar cheese.

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UNHAPPY THE MORTAL !

The motivations given for people to emigrate to Virginia often include those of economic gain and escape from the stifling English class system; the latter leading to the former. A motivation of a starker kind was an escape from political terror, which can be explained through a brief account of families connected to Mells, in Somerset, of which, a case can be made, derived Sergeant John Harris of Virginia.

His ancestor may have been “Thomas Harrys”, a tenant of Glastonbury Abbey, who is recorded thus: Harrys v Dyar. Plaintiffs: Thomas Harrys. Defendants: Thomas Dyar, knight. Subject: Tenement in the late abbot of Glastonbury’s manor of Greinton. Somerset. 1544-1551. (C 1/1228/15-18). In 1545, the manor was granted to Sir Thomas Dyer, d. 1565. The John Horner who came to possess the Manor of Mells, a village near Frome, 6 WSW. of Glastonbury, was not his namesake who was steward to the late Abbot of Glastonbury, though undoubbtedly related. The intermarriage of the Symes with the Horners brought them much land, and brought about their lordship of the Fulgham family at Potminster.

The late abbot” (Richard Whiting) lived at Mells. Depositions as to the late abbot of Glastonbury (Somerset) taken at Wells (Somerset) before Nicholas Fitzjames esq. and John Mawdleyn gent, king’s surveyors. Sir Thomas Way, priest, 68, formerly monk of Glastonbury, deposes that he knows of no reason why the late abbot ought to have delivered £100 to Robert Burges, or that he delivered it, and that Robert married a niece of the late abbot. Sir Thomas used to serve the late abbot as his chaplain and often heard the late abbot say that Robert should not lose out due to the costs he had to incur in repairing the decay to his house at Mells, and that such costs should be allowed to him.

Thomas Whyting of Pilton (Somerset), 63, deposes that Robert Burges (his probable brother-in-law) married the niece of the late abbot but bestowed nothing upon her or promised anything. However, Robert took a tenement from the late abbot in Mells with two mills which at the time were in great decay, delivered £100 to him and requested that he make the repairs. In so doing, Robert incurred costs of about 300 marks.

Thomas Harrys of Mells (probably the tenant of Greinton), carpenter, 50, deposes that the tenement and mills were in great decay, and that for his labour he received £7 from Burges. He also received £10 for repairing the grist mill.

His descendants, Richard Harris, bapt. Aug. 24, 1589, who m. Edith Burges, Jan. 14, 1607, in Nunney, and (possibly) Sergeant John Harris, bapt. Oct. 1, 1587, in Nunney, were first-cousins (by this estimate). Richard Harris probably married into the same Burgess family as the aforesaid Robert Burgess, and he and his cousin would have been well aware of the fate of Bishop Richard Whiting.

He graduated from Cambridge in 1483, and was, at first, a royal favourite, but was executed (in 1539) for treason in the form of remaining loyal to Rome against the dictate of a powerful, paranoid psychopath, otherwise known as Henry VIII. The Bishop, with two of his men, were fastened upon sledges and dragged by horses to the top of Glastonbury Tor which overlooks the town. Here they were hanged, drawn and quartered, with Whiting’s head being fastened over the west gate of the now deserted abbey and his limbs displayed at Wells, Bath, Ilchester and Bridgwater.

Unhappy the mortal who lives only on the smile of princes!

The same applied in the following reign, with the Catholic half of England praying for a successful Spanish invasion.

Hollywood it was not, and an escape from political terror (murder dressed as execution) was a prime motivation for emigration to Virginia.

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HARCOURTS BY OTHER NAMES

1. Torf. According to Robert of Torigny (GND, viii. c. 37), Torf was the father of Turold and Turchetil (see also OV ii. 12). It is wrongly assumed that this Turchetil was a forefather of the Harcourts; he died childless, passing his estate to his great-nephew, Asketil (cart. Preaux, fol. 97v; CP xi. Instr., col. 201 a. d., Du Monstier, Neustria Pia, p. 522, 1663). Turold mar. Duvelina de Crepon, sister of Gunnor, the wife of ‘Duke’ Richard; they were ancestors of the Beaumont family of Pont-Audemer, and, according to Auguste le Prevost, of the Harcourts, with Turold and Duvelina being the parents of both Onfroi de Vieilles (GND vii. 1. 3.), and Turchetil. (See Ordericus, ed. Prevost, vol. i., p. 180; ii. pp. 14, 369, 370; iii. pp. 42, 229).
1.1. Turchetil.
1.2. ‘Turoldis teneri ducis pedagogus perimitur’ (Will. Gemet, VII.).
1.2.1. Hunfrid (Onfroi de Vieilles, alias Vetulis or Vaux, lord of Vieilles; a small commune in the canton of Beaumont, arrondissement of Bernay.
1.2.1.1. Roger de Beaumont; Asketil, his dapifer, being a junior kinsman.
1.2.1.1.1. Robert de Beaumont, Ist Earl Leicester.
1.2.1.1.1.1. Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl Leicester, founder of Garendon in 1133, to which donated his kinsmen, Hugh de Berges, and his son, Asketil.

1.2.2. Turchetil.
1.2.2.1. Asketil (de Harcourt) de Rieu, gave the abbey of Tréport, c. 1060, the tithes of ‘decimam suam de Riu’. (Carlularium sanctae Trinilatis, p. 425). He is noted as ‘senis’, distinguishing him from his son.
1.2.2.1.1. Hugues de Rieu, confirmed his father’s gifts to Treport. At Domesday, he held Rotingedene (near Bergemere, contracted to Burg and Berges) from William de Warenne. His son, William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey (d. 1138), m. Isabelle de Vermandois, widow of Robert de Beaumont, 1st Earl of Leicester, whose son founded Garendon.
1.2.2.1.1.1. Anscherio (dapifer) de Moncellis. In Easter of 1107, before the barons of king Henry, he gave witness in a dispute concerning fisheries, donated to Treport by Robert d’Eu; the witnesses being Abraham de Petra; Geroldo dapifero; Gauffrido de Envremou; Anscherio de Moncellis, multisque aliis. Dr Keats-Rohan suggests that the Ansketil who held land at Bexhill, Footland and Wellhead in Sussex from the Count of Eu was ‘perhaps’ Ansketil of Rieux, who accounted in Sussex in the Pipe Roll of 1130 and whose family appears in the early charters of Tréport abbey, founded by the Count of Eu. He may have been the Ansketil de Jorz who is recorded in England in 1110 and who (it is suggested) is synonomous with the “nobis Aschetillus dispensator” and his son “Galfridus” noted by Bridgeman (The Burton Abbey Twelfth Century Surveys, Collections for a History of Staffordshire, p. 225, 1918). Sometime during the period 1133- 48, as “Asketillus de Berges,” he gave four carucates of the land of Burton to the Abbot and Convent of St. Mary at Garendon, the charter being witnessed by Robert, Earl of Leicester, and Ives de Harcourt, who d. 1148. (B.M. MS Lansdowne 415, folios 8, 31v.).
1.2.2.1.1.1.1. Geoffrey le Despenser (‘Gaufrido dispensatore’), ‘dispensarius’ to the Earl of Chester.
1.2.2.1.1.1.1.1. Thomas le Despenser, donated to Garendon as ‘Tomas Dispensator, filius Gaufridi Dispensatoris’. (John Nichols, The History and Antiquities of the County of Leicester, vol. III, part 2, 1804).
1.2.2.1.2. Asketil. D.B.: The Land of the Count of Eu, Bexill Hundred: ‘Ansketil of Rieux 1/2 hide‘. The English Harcourts:
1.2.2.1.2.1. Robert fitz Anschetil, ob. 1118 (ctl. Preaux, fol. 102v). Held Norman fiefs.
1.2.2.1.2.1.1. William fitz Robert, fl. 1149 (P.R. 31 H. 1). Granted Stanton-under-Bardon, Leic., to Garendon Abbey, founded by Robert de Beaumont (cart. Garendon, fols. 5v., 15v.).
1.2.2.1.2.1.1.1. Robert fitz William, mar. Eve Crispin, da. of baron of the Vexin Normande, Joscelin Crispin.
1.2.2.1.2.1.2. Ivo de Harcourt. He ratified the confirmation of his brother, William, of their father’s gifts to Garendon (ctl. Garendon, fol. 15v.; Nichols’ Leic. vii.). ‘In 1148/9, William de Harcourt, with the consent of his brother and heir, Ivo, and mother, Agnes, alienated to Garendon the manor of Stanton-under-Bardon, which was specifically their patrimonium’ (Benjamin Thompson, Monasteries and Society in Medieval Britain, p. 107, 1999). It was Ivo who was the progenitor of the English line of Harcourts. “The later forfeiture of the English lands of the ‘Norman’ Harcourts makes them difficult to trace, but we do at least know some of them in Leicestershire … the remaining part of the Harcourt inheritance in the manor of Leicester was being held by Ivo de Harcourt before the end of Stephen’s reign” (Crouch, Beaumont Twins, pp.125-6).

1.2.2.1.1.2. Ralph de Monceaux. In 1130, he was pardoned 20s 6d of Danegeld in Sussex. Wibert’s holding of the count of Eu in 1086 was 9 hides and 1 virgate, of which the danegeld would be 18s 6d; one hide on the honour of Warenne would make the total danegeld 20s 6d. Farrer’s notes introduce the suggestion that in 1129/30 Ralf de Monceux was in possession of Wibert’s 1086 holding. On November 14, 1148 he witnessed a charter of John Count of Eu and in the same month was addressed in terms that suggest he was acting in the role of sheriff of Hastings Rape: “John, count of Eu, to Ralph de Munceaus and all his men of the Rape of Hastings. I have restored to the church of Chichester and to Bishop Hylary the manor of Bixla, to be held of the King, and have seized him thereof. I order you to let him hold it. Farewell”. (Chichester Chartulary. Liber Y, nos 299 and 300; Sussex Record Society vol XLVI 1942-3).
1.2.2.1.1.2.1. Anscher (Asketil) de Monceaux (de Moncellis). “Ego Hugo de Mortuo-mari aliquando cogitans de morte et vita, volens unam evitare et aliam adipisci, dubitans qua via incederem, labore enim manuum non queo, quia fodere non valeo, putavi levius per elemosynam perficere, quia audivi à multis quod sicut aquaextinguit ignem, itaelemosyna extinguit peccatum. Les témoins sont : Hugues, abbé de St.-Victor, Anscher de Monchaux (de Moncellis), Willaume, son fils, H. de Nellette, H. de Rue,* W. Gourle, etc. *Hugues de Rieux.
1.2.2.1.1.2.1.1. Raoul de Monchaux. In 1175, with the consent of Agnes, his wife (probably de Balliol), Guillaume and Jean, his children, and in the presence of Guy d’Avesnes, Guy de Balliol, and Gauthier de Saint Remy, granted, perpetually and frankly, Abbey of Saint-Michel du Tréport, all the rights which he and his predecessors could have over his church at Rieux and chapel at Monchaux, within the same parish; the chapel later to be made a church. In 1186, he donated to Sery in memory of his son, William. His last donation was in 1205.
1.2.2.1.1.2.2. Hugues de Rieux, as given.
1.2.2.1.1.2.3. Alan de Monceaux, s.l. 1161, of Monchxaux-Soreng, near Aumale. Canton de Blangy (from whence the Crispins), arrondissement de Neufchâtel-en-Bray (Seine-Inférieure)
1.2.2.1.1.2.3.1. Ingelran de Monceux, d. 1205. He was also known as “Inghelramus de Jortis“. (Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol. 13 p., 60, 1930, cit. Cartulary of the Abbey of Old Wardon, 1 John). He married Idonia, granddaughter of Juliana ‘filia John fitz Waleran’, of Herstmonceux and Warberton, Sussex, and Little Easton, Essex, who had livery of her father’s lands in 1128. She m. (1) William de Hastings, as 2nd wife, (PR 31 Henry I). She m. (2) Robert Doisnel, a royal marshal. By a first wife, William de Hastings was father of Robert de Hastings, despenser to King Henry II, confirmed in the office of Ralph de Hastings, his uncle. Ingelran took possession of his wife’s inheritance in 1199.

1.2.2.2. Lesceline, m. William I, Count of Eu, illegitimate son of ‘Duke’ Richard I. of Normandy. Lesceline, Countess of Eu, held the fief of Jort.
1.2.2.2.1. Robert d’Eu, the founder of Treport, to which Asketil de Rieu probably donated as his uncle.

Generally, the repetition of patterns of association is paramount to understanding these people, as they organised themselves to survive through familial bonds.

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GRESLEY/HERIZ

1. Nigel de Gresley (Nigel de Torp), tenant of Henry de Ferrers in 1086. He was possibly Nigellus Camerarius, the chamberlain of earl Roger de Poictou,
1.1. William FitzNigel. Greisley juxta pontem de Burton, in the deanery of Repindon, was a small priory of canons of St. Austin, founded by William, son of Nigel de Geresley, temp. Hen. I. dedicated to St. Mary and St. George, and valued, 26 Hen. VIII. at 31/. 6s. per ann. according to Dugdale; William FitzNigel also founded Norton priory, near Runcorn, in Cheshire. W’mus fil. Nigel, fundator monast. de Gresley m. Elena. In a book of church notes in the British Museum, is the following account of this family: “The church of Gresley is situated two miles from the Trent, among the woods, where William, the son of Nigel de Gresley, founded a priorie in the honore of St. George, the ruins wherof remain; of which priorie the Gresleys were patrons, and had a necessarie voyce in the election of the pryore. It doth appeare to me by manie circumstances, that the Gresleys had the full complement of our ancient barrons; as fyrst, the hundred of Gresley, co. Derby, being one of the divisions of the county, to be held by the Gresleys in barinagio; then, a priorie of their foundation; then their castle of their own surname, seated within a mile of the pryorie, toward the Trent.
1.1.1. Robertus de Gresley, miles, fil. Wil’m and Basilia. An abbey for Cistertian monks, at Swineshead, co. Lincoln, was founded, in 1134, by Robert Greslei, and valued, at the dissolution, according to Dugdale, at 167/ 15s. 3d. per ann. Robert Greseley, however, had ” Mortun ” only by exchange with a younger brother Engenolf, to whom he gave in lieu Swart (Swarthincote, a small lordship in Greseley parish, Derbyshire), with two bovates in Kingesleya,” and two in ” Bredleia,” both in Staffordshire. Test. Domina Basilia uxor. Rob. de Gresel; and, among others, four more Greseleys, Nigel, Henry, William, Ralph, all younger brothers of Robert.
1.1.1.1. W’mus de Gresley, miles, fil. et haer. Rob. Temp. king John, William de Ferrers, sixth earl of Derby and Nottingham, had a grant from that king,in 1206, of William de Gresley and his heirs, for his lands at Drakelow, to hold in capite by the service of a bow without a string, a quiver, made at Tutbury, and thirteen arrows, twelve fledged or feathered, and one unfeathered. The later Gressleys assumed arms nearly similar to those of the family of Ferrers, viz. Vaire, ermine and gules.
1.1.2. Ralph de Gresley. “Rad’us de Gresley et Agnes uxor ejus”, probably Agnes de Heriz. Ralph de Seile held the manor of Netherseale, co. Leicester, t. Hen. I. In the time of Hen. 11. with the consent of William, earl Ferrers, sold his mill at Seile, with four virgates of his demesne land, to Ralph, son of William de Greseley, for 13 marks of silver. Among the many witnesses to this deed, are, Willielmo de G’sel, et Robt. filio suo, et Henrico, et Willielmo, Waltero de Somervilla, Rob’ de Ferr.’ et Rogero Capellano, et Willielmo Decano de Tatenhull, Johanne de Lisvis, &c. A large thick seal; the earl on horseback: sigillum Willielmi comitis de Ferrariis. Radulph de Gresele gives one carucate in Seile to Mirevall. Seile mill was in the hands of the canous of Greseley, not long after the purchase made of it by Rad. de Greseley. Robert de Arraby gave two bovates of land at Eaton, co. Leicester, cum corpore suo, to Croxton abbey, with the appurtenances of the fee of Griseley; which appears to have been subordinate to that of Ferrars. Agnes de Heriz was the grandda. of Robert de Heriz, who in 1086 held of William Peverel in Stapleford 2 carucates, and da. of Galfr. de Heriz, Lord of Stapleford. When William Peverel I. founded the Priory of Lenton, in the first decade of the twelfth-century, donators to it were his feudatories in Avranches; “les hommes de Guillaume Peverel sont du diocèse d’Avranches”, being “Le premier était Avenel, Raoul Malherbe, Norman de Saint Patrice, Geoffroy de Heriz, Adelelme ou Adelée, Robert de Mortain (Société d’archéologie et d’histoire de la Manche, p. 56, 1992). It is also possible that Nigel de Torp was of one of these families.
1.1.2.1. Agnes, m. Hugh FitzRalph, who assumed the name of Gressley.
1.1.2.1.1. In 1211, Ralph de Gresele held three knight’s fees of the honour of Peverell, of which two were in Claydon; and married Isabel, daughter of Robert de Muschamp, with whom, on payment of a fine in 1219, he was admitted to the lands of Robert de Muschamp her brother
1.1.2.1.1.1. Hugh fil Rad de Gresley. From the Pipe Rolls: Eccleston: Galf de Eccleston 1 fee of Richard de Stapelford (Heriz), Hugh fil Rad de Gresley 3 fees.
1.1.2.2. Galfr. (Geoffrey) de Eccleston (Heriz), who held Stapleford, and with the consent of his mother, Alice, gifted to Lenton. Galfridus de Eccleston’ debet x li. pro habenda saisina de terra quam Avicia que fuit uxor Ricardi de Camera. (Pipe Roll, 1224).
1.1.2.2.1. Richard de Heriz (de Stapleford), held that manor in 1250, his son, Hugh, being aged 25 years.
1.1.2.2.1.1. Hugh de Heriz, died seized of this fee in 1297.
1.1.2.2.1.1.1. Richard de Heriz, born 1282, d. bef. 1316.
1.1.2.2.1.1.1.1. Richard de Heriz, b. November 7, 1307.
1.1.3. Nigel de Gresley.
1.2. A daughter, m. Albert … who assumed the name Gresley. There are various connotations that can be chosen from when attempting to construct pedigrees from tenurial relationships. In this instance, I have conjectured that a daughter of Nigel de Torp married Albert, with him being an in-law of the Gresleys, rather than their progenitor. The suppositions of old also strain chronologies, with there perhaps being a missing generation in the early Gresley/Heriz lineage. Thus, Robert who held of the Peverells at Domesday was probably followed by another Robert, father of Geoffroy de Heriz.

‘Of the land of Roger de Poitou were two manors in Hainton, one held by Albert, ancestor of the family of Grelle or Gresley, with soke in Sixhill, Barkwith, and Southry, which is thus entered. “Second manor. In Haintone Clac and Sendi had one carucate and half a bovate subject to Danegeld. Land to two ploughs. There Albert, the vassal of Roger, has one plough and three villains ploughing with three oxen, and fifty-four acres of meadow. About 1100, Eccleston was divided between Albert de Greslye and Roger de Busli. (Francis Gastrell, Notitia Cestiensis: Or Historical Notices of the Diocese of Chester). “In the Domesday Survey, the south of Lancashire is included in Cheshire, the hundred of Amounderness in Yorkshire, and that of Lonsdale is comprised under Westmorland, Cumberland, and Yorkshire. The dale or vale of the Lune is formed into one word in this record, where it occurs as a manor, surveyed under Craven in the West Riding of Yorkshire. “Two manors. In Lanesdale and Cocreham, Ulf and Machall had two carucates to be taxed. Here Lanesdale seems to denote Thurnham, but the latter occurs as Tiernum in earl Tosti’s manor of Haltune. In a charter of the 2d of king John, by which the lands formerly belonging to Nigellus Camerarius, probably the chamberlain of the great earl Roger de Poictou, were granted to Henry Fitz Hervey and his heirs (c. 1200), land towards or opposite the valley of Loon is mentioned”. (Edward Baines, History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster, vol. 4, 1868).

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INGELRAN DE JORT

1. Ranulf, the Moneyer.
1.1. Waleran fitz Ranulf, sold mill at Vains in 1061, sold land at Caen and mill at Amblie in 1066.
1.1.1. John fitz Waleran.
1.1.1.1. Juliana ‘filia John fitz Waleran’, of of Herstmonceux and Warberton, Sussex, and Little Easton, Essex, had livery of his father’s lands, 1128, m. (1) William de Hastings, as 2nd wife, (PR 31 Henry I, 58). She m. (2) Robert Doisnel, a royal marshal. By a first wife, William de Hastings was father of Robert de Hastings, despenser to King Henry II, confirmed in the office of Ralph de Hastings, his uncle.
1.1.1.1.1. Juliana, m. William fitz Aldelin, Henry 11’s steward. In 1199 her heirs in both the land of John fitz Waleran and the marshal serjeanty (held by Robert Doisnel) were William of Warberton and Ingelran de Monceux, whose rights derived from his wife Idonea de Monceux (Farrer, HKF iii, 376). William, the senior heir, and Idonea, were probably descendants of the elder Juliana’s first marriage to William of Hastings. Part of the inheritance they shared was five fees at Herstmonceaux and Warberton held of the count of Eu in the Rape of Hastings.
1.1.1.1.2. A daughter.
1.1.1.1.2.1. Idonia, m. Ingelran de Monceux, son of Alan de Monceaux, s.l. 1161, of Monchxaux-Soreng, near Aumale. He was also known as “de Jortis”. “Inghelramus de Jortis, Johannes Basm’, Philippo dapifero Robertus de Bruai, Gaufridus de Sandon, Alexander de Coldree, Willelmus filius eius, Radulfus frater eius, et plures alii”. (Publications of the Bedfordshire Historical Record Society, vol. 13 p., 60, 1930, cit. Cartulary of the Abbey of Old Wardon). 1 John.
1.1.1.1.2.1.1. Robert de Monceaux, recorded as a knight in 1207. (EYC, ibid.).

Lesceline de Harcourt, m. William I, Count of Eu, illegitimate son of ‘Duke’ Richard I. of Normandy. Lesceline, Countess of Eu, held the fief of Jort. Their son was Robert d’Eu, the founder of Treport, to which Asketil de Rieu probably donated as his  wife’s brother. Asketil de Rieu, gave the abbey of Tréport, c. 1060, the tithes of ‘decimam suam de Riu’. (Carlularium sanctae Trinitatis, p. 425). He is noted as ‘senis’, distinguishing him from this son: Ansketil holds of Robert, count of Eu. (Footland. Phil. ref. 9,128). Ansketil ‘the man of Robert, count of Eu’. (Wellhead. Phil. ref. 9,130). He is likely to have been Robert’s cousin, and also likely to be the Ansketil de Jorz who is recorded in England in 1110, and named as Aschetillus dispensator.

It would seem that “Inghelramus de Jortis” was of this branch of the family.

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