THE DERRICK FAMILY OF BRISTOL AND VIRGINIA

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The Derrick family of Bristol, Gloucestershire, England, like many Bristol seafaring merchants, were originally of Somerset.

Francis Derrick, Sen. is recorded in 1632 as gifting bread to the poor of St. Stephen’s, in Bristol. His will was probated in March, 1638. (PROB 11/176/291). His son and namesake is recorded in 1661 as paying for the teaching of poor children of Long Ashton. (Report of the Commissioners Appointed for Inquiring Concerning Charities, p. 18, 1827).

It can not be sure whether it is father or son who are recorded in the following documents; although the latter ones almost certainly pertain to Francis Derrick Jun., born. c. 1600.

E 115/117/162. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in the hundred of Winterstoke, etc., Somerset, the previous area of tax liability. 1621
E 115/132/141. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in (county unknown), the previous area of tax liability. 1622.
E 115/131/21. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in the hundred of [Winterstoke, etc.], Somerset, the previous area of tax liability.
E 115/124/59. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in the half-hundred of Portbury, etc., Somerset, the previous area of tax liability. 1626.
E 115/128/37. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke (or the variant surname: Dericke, Dyricke) to be liable for taxation in Gloucestershire, and not in the hundreds of Brent, Bempstone, Portbury, and Hartcliffe, Somerset, the previous area of tax liability. 1628.
E 115/115/51. Certificate of residence showing Francis Derricke to be liable for taxation in Bristol. 1629.
E 134/3and4Chas1/Hil3. Sir William Waller, knight, Abell Kitchen, John Guy, Richard Holworthy v. Francis Derrick, Edward Ballhashe.: Prisage of wines coming to the Port of Bristol from St. Mallowes (St. Malo), in the year 1626.
E 134/12Chas1/Mich39. Sir John Banks, knight (Attorney-General). v. Humfrey Hooke, Walter Ellis, John Gouning, junior, Francis Derrick, Thomas Cole, John Taylor, Andrew Charlton, Thomas Colston.:”Letters of marque or mart” [i.e. ships of war], which left Bristol between 1st Dec. 1625 and 25 Mar. 1635 (the time of the late war between England, France, and Spain). Payment of customs. Value of prizes taken, &c., &c.: Bristol; Anglia; Spain; France. 12 Chas 1.
E 134/11and12Chas1/Hil20. Francis Derrick v. Attorney-General, Sir John Wolstenholme, knight, Henry Garway (Alderman of London), William Willett.: Port of Bristol. Touching bonds given to defendants (farmers, &c., of customs in the port) for the payment of customs due there by Edwd. Balhash, merchant of Bristol. 11 & 12 Chas 1.

The hundred of Winterstoke, consisted of these parishes: Axbridge, Badgworth, Banwell, Blagdon, Bleadon, Cheddar, Christon, Churchill, Compton Bishop, Congresbury, East Harptree, Hutton, Kenn, Kewstoke, Locking, Loxton, Puxton, Rodney Stoke, Rowberrow, Shipham, Uphill, Weston-super-Mare, Wick St Lawrence, Winscombe, Worle, Yatton.

The Derrick family of the hundred of Winterstoke are almost invariably recorded as being of the parishes of Blagdon and Worle. The former is 8 miles from Cheddar, the latter is 11 miles from Cheddar; where was a Harris family which almost certainly migrated to Virginia.

William Barker, bapt. on 7 May 1592 in St. Werburgh’s, Bristol; merchant and mariner, who deposed his age to be 37 in 1629, and mate of the Hopewell, which sailed fom Virginia on New years Eve of that year for England, under Captain Richard Russell, in company with ‘the Gift’ of London, under Captain Samuel Crampton and Master Edward Beale. (See Coldham, P.W., English Adventurers and Emigrants, 1609-1660, p. 23, 1984). He bought land in Flowerdew Hundred from Abraham Piersey’s da., Elizabeth. This property passed to his son, John Barker, in 1655, who left the plantation to two of his sisters, Sarah and Elizabeth Limbrey. He was a partner of Francis Derrick: April 13, 1639: ‘Bond of Francis Derrick (the younger), of Bristol, and William Barker, of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, to the King, in 1,000l. conditioned for the appearance of Derrick before the Council, to answer an accusation of piracy pretended to have been committed by him upon a Spanish ship in a voyage to Virginia, about 11th October 1636’.

The salient point is that Francis Derrick was associated with Sergeant John Harris.

‘Whereas John Baker (the Barker family of Bristol were interchangeably called Baker in ships’ records) and Dorothy his wife, daughter of the late deceased Sergeant John Harris, have by order of court at Henrico on the 27th day of August last surrendered to mee Captain Francis Derrick all the right and title which they and claime unto the devident of land belonging to the late deceased Georg Cawcott which was given to the said Dorothy by the last will and testament of the said Cawcott as by the surrender in the said court and by the pattent and will recorded at James Cittie, etc. For good and valuable causes and considerations. Wtnesses: Lawrence Hulett and John Owell’ (Nugent, B. 1., part 2, p. 113).

Dorothy Harris and her husband were not selling land to a stranger.

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DREW AND NEWETT

1. Thomas Drew, often quoted as coming from Exeter, on the sole basis of a namesake being recorded in the Visitation of Devon. He was more likely to have been the Thomas Drew, bapt. 7 May 1594 (son of Robert) in Stocklinch Ottersay, 30 mls. fom Dunster, Somerset, manor of the Lutterell family. Thomas Drew apparently m. (as her third husband) Frances Ward, relict of 1. William Barker, mariner, 2. Robert Letherland. Capt.

These are not strange associations; those of ship owners and merchants and the provincial families they allied to in the persuit of ‘tobacco profits’.

Morgan Bryan, bapt. Aug. 14, 1621, Munster, Ireland; d. June 1682 in Gloucester Co., Virginia, aged 61; m. Alice Barker, 1650, in Brugge. Morgan was certified as Ship Captain in Charles City, Virginia, June 11, 1646, by Capt. Henry Barker, cousin of Morgan’s wife, Alice. Captain Henry Barker, son of Captain William Barker, was b. 1617, and bur. in St. Margaret’s Parish, Westminster, London, 1669. John Beale claimed the head right of Morgan Bryan and used it to obtain a patent of 400 acres in Charles River Co., dated Oct. 10, 1642. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, vol. 1., p. 135). Alice was the sister of Captain Henry Barker, and John Barker. Morgan Bryan had issue: (1) Henry Bryan, b. in 1654 in Gloucester Co.; d. in 1721 in Bristol, Gloucestershire, England; certified as Ship Captain by Capt John Barker of Charles City, in June 1670. Memoranda on arrest of tobacco for avoidance of dutires: Henry Bryan and John Kemp Nov. 12, 1698. John Kemp was the grandson of Richard Kemp, Governor of Virginia, 1644-1645. (2) Edward Bryan Sr, b. in 1663 in London, d. in 1739, in Craven Co., NC, at age 76; m. Christian Council (d. 1743). Tombstone: ‘Edward Bryan, b. in London 1663, emigrated to Nansemond Cnty, Virginia 1690, Moved to Craven Cnty 1700 – Died 1739. Christiana, his wife da. of Hodges Council, d. 1743’. Children 1. Edward Bryan Jr. b: 1690, m. Anne Collier, and d. 1745 Craven Co. N.C. 2. Lewis Bryan, b. 1691, m. Elizabeth Bryan, a cousin. 3. Hardy Bryan, b. 1692, m. Sarah Johnson, and d. bef. May 6, 1760 Craven Co. 4. John Bryan, b. 1706, m. Rebecca Orton. Christian was the da. of Hodges Council and his wife, Lucy Hardy.

Thus, a general principle: provincial English families (with a surplus of younger sons) attempted to survive by ‘jumping on to the bandwagon’ of the Virginia trade, associating themselves with (and financing) the ship-owning mercantile class who controlled it – the brutal economics of survival shaped genealogy, not considerations of the heart.

Of the facilatators of survival, one such was:

William Barker, bapt. on 7 May 1592 in St. Werburgh’s, Bristol; merchant and mariner, who deposed his age to be 37 in 1629, and mate of the Hopewell, which sailed fom Virginia on New years Eve of that year for England, under Captain Richard Russell, in company with ‘the Gift’ of London, under Captain Samuel Crampton and Master Edward Beale. (See Coldham, P.W., English Adventurers and Emigrants, 1609-1660, p. 23, 1984). He bought land in Flowerdew Hundred from Abraham Piersey’s da., Elizabeth. This property passed to his son, John Barker, in 1655, who left the plantation to two of his sisters, Sarah and Elizabeth Limbrey. (On such facts lies are created). William Barker traded out of London with his partners, which included John Sadler and Richard Quiney, merchants, associated with the Yarwood family of Southwark, London, with whom he patented land in Charles City County. He was also a partner of Francis Derrick: April 13, 1639: ‘Bond of Francis Derrick (the younger), of Bristol, and William Barker, of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, to the King, in 1,000l. conditioned for the appearance of Derrick before the Council, to answer an accusation of piracy pretended to have been committed by him upon a Spanish ship in a voyage to Virginia, about 11th October 1636’. Francis Derrick was the son of his namesake – see Prob. 11/176/291, the Will of Francis Derrick, Merchant of Bristol, Gloucestershire.

The salient point, surely, Francis Derrick was associated with Sergeant John Harris.

‘Whereas John Baker (the Barker family were interchangeably called Baker in ships’ records) and Dorothy his wife, daughter of the late deceased Sergeant John Harris, have by order of court at Henrico on the 27th day of August last surrendered to mee Captain Francis Derrick all the right and title which they and claime unto the devident of land belonging to the late deceased Georg Cawcott which was given to the said Dorothy by the last will and testament of the said Cawcott as by the surrender in the said court and by the pattent and will recorded at James Cittie, etc. For good and valuable causes and considerations. Wtnesses: Lawrence Hulett and John Owell’ (Nugent, B. 1., part 2, p. 113).

1.1. Letitia Drew, m. John Barker; presumably a relative of William Barker; though not he m. to the Sergeant’s da., unless she was his second wife.
1.1.1. John Barker Jr., who patented 600 ac. on Chippokee Creek, Oct. 5, 1657. He m. Grace Cotton, Thomas Cotton’s Will names Grace Barker as his da. John Barker’s Will, probated in Surry County, May 19, 1714 (Deeds-Wills 1709-1715, p. 191-2), names ‘Sarah Lanier, da., wife of Robert Lanier’, cousin of Sampson Lanier, who m. Elizabeth Washington; their issue: Sampson Lanier, Jr., m. Elizabeth Chamberlain; their da., Rebecca Louise Lanier, m. Walton Harris , b. February 6, 1738, Brunswick Co., Virginia, son of son of Nathan Harris and Catherine Walton; son of Edward Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688. Of certain connection to Thomas Harris (d. 1688) was John Harris: Jun. 28, 1685. Jethro Barker of upper parish to John Harris (d. 1686, as follows), of the same 120 ac. adj. sd Jethro Barker. Wit: John Barker and Thomas Cotten (Surry co., VA Deeds, Wills, etc. 1684-1687, Hopkins). Thomas Busby, Gent, to Roger Potter … 100 acres on the head of upper Chipeokes Creeke and bounded by John Barker and the path to Mr. Stevens’ mill. Witt; William Rooking,* Elias Osborne and John Mose., Rec. 7 May 1689. Surry Co. Deeds, Wills, Etc. *Associated with the land of Sergeant John Harris.
1.1.1.1. Josiah Barker, named in father’s will, prob. 19 May 1714, Surry., W.B. 6, P. 91. He m. Faith Washington, sister of the said Elizabeth Washington, and of Priscilla Washington, wife of Robert Lanier.
1.1.1.1.1. Grace Barker. Will Feb. 19, 1741, proven May 15, 1750. brother Josiah; cousin Richard Barker; brother John Barker, cousin Josiah Barker; cousin Mary Bishop; Mary Bishop’s son James; cousins William, Joshua and Joell Barker; gifts to Faith and Elizabeth Barker. Richard Barker, exr.; Wits.: Robert Lanier, Josiah Barker, Josiah Barker. (Surry Co. VA W.B. 1738-54, p. 673).

1.2. Nicholas Drew, m … Tailer, 19 Sept. 1619, Dunster, St George, Somerset.
1.2.1. Robert Drew
1.2.1.1. John Drew, bapt. 1 Dec. 1644, Dunster.
1.2.1. Richard Drew, bapt. 28 Apr. 1622, Dunster, d. after 4 Apr. 1679, Surry Co.
1.2.1.1. Edward Drew, m. Frances Newett, da. of William Newitt and Elizabeth Jones. 4 Jan. 1685: William Harris and wife Mary Harris, to William Newsum … 220 ac. now in the tenure of Mr. John Harris; adj. William Newett, and the Sunken Marsh Path. Wit. Robert Ruffin. R. 5 Jan. 1685. William Harris was the son of of Thomas Harris, d. 1668. During his orpanage, a part of his father’s estate was leased to John Harris, d. 1686, whose Will was witnessed by William Newsums, John Clarke, and William Newett Newitt. (B. 3, p. 82).

There must be a possibility that that William Newett was the son of Wiliam Newett (citizen and draper) and Sarah Nichols, born at par. of Antholin, London. Will pr. Jan. 9, 1639 by relict (4 Coventry). Sarah Nichols was the da. of Elizabeth Nichols, whose Will named grandsons John (d.v.p) and William Newett, daus. Sara Newett and Mary Browne; and Mrs Susan Wilkinson. It mentioned land in Hackney. Execs. son in law Edward Browne, and son in law Wlm Newett. Wit. Elenor Taylor and Ephraim Thorne. (Consistory Court of London, 1621-1630, f234).

The said Ephraim Thorne is recorded here: Parties: Jerman Honychurch, citizen and haberdasher of London. Ephraim Thorne of London, merchant. Place or Subject: Bargain and sale of an eighth share in the St. Anthony, formerly the Penelope of London, now on a voyage to the Western Islands and Brasil under William Babb, master. (Nat. Arch. ref. E 214/1225. 14 May 1634).

He was in some way closely related to Richard Thorn: By 1643 27 ac. in Soper Lane was held by Richard Thorne, citizen and draper, who made a lease of it to Ephraim Thorne, citizen and merchant tailor, for 7 years at a peppercorn rent. In 1645 Richard and his wife Elizabeth made a lease to Ephraim for a further 30 years from 1650, at a peppercorn rent. The tenant then was John English. Ephraim was to do all repairs. In 1647 Richard and Elizabeth sold 27A to Ephraim, describing it as a tenement called the Maidenhead, now or late occupied by John Inglish, silkman. It adjoined Thomas Diconson’s tenement. (Historical Gazetteer of London Before the Great Fire).

There must also be a possibility that Martin Thorne was of this family: ‘The Nuncupative Will of deced to be proved by the Oaths of the Subscribers who declare as followeth vizt that about ye Midle of Febry last ye said Thorne then being sick & about two days before he dyed desiered yor deponants to take notice that he gave all his weareing apparrell to his Son Martin Thorne and a White hat the rest of his Estate after his debts were paid to his Wife Margarett, and further ye depont: sayeth not. Rogr. Nichols. At a Court held at Southwarke for the County of Surry March ye. 3rd: 1695.

1666 2 Feb Dorothy Thorne to serve Chas. Barham 6 yrs. for lodging, food, clothing, teaching and at finish to give her clothing, heifer, corn, etc. Sig. Dorothy Thorne, Charles and Elizabeth Barham. Wit. Margaret Cornish, Chris. Smith, Joane Goard.

1675. David Williams. Leg. Wm. Harris, orphan, of one gun and two pewter dishes. To wife Martha (Harris) Williams, my whole estate to be divided between her and her children. Prob. 28 May 1676 Wit: James Murray, Jno. Twyford (B. 2, p. 106). 28 March 1676: Probate granted Martin Thorne, who m. relict of David Williams dec’d.

28 March 1676: In difference bet. Capt. Charles Barham plt. and Martin Thorne deft., ‘aboute trading with plts. servts, it is ord. that Thorne pay Barham 20 lbs. Shugr. and costs’. (Think about this, survival (one-upmanship) was measurable in bags of sugar).

4 July 1676: Ord. that Martin Thorne who married excs. of David Williams present at next court full and just acct. of Est. of Wm. Harris Orpht.

15 Sept. 1676: Martin Thorne appoints Wm Seward his atty. with Christopher Smith. Wit. Sion Hill, Walter Taylor.

Court held at Southwark, 2 March 1685: Martin Thorne appearing with the orph. of David Williams dec’d and alleadging he would not keepe her nor her estate and orphan being desirous to live with Wm. Prosser whose wife had promised to teach her severall things … It is ord. that Wm. Newsom, Mathew Swan and Robt. Lancaster bet. this and next Cort appr. sd. Thorn’s estate and Robt. Ruffin take an account of things appraysed and due to the orphans.

Martin Thorne: Est. Appr. by Robt. Lancaster, Wm. Newsum, Matthew Swann. Wm. Harris, John Fenly and Roger Nichols ord. to appr. Estate of Martin Thorne.

1. William Harris, m. Dorothy West, Aug. 31, 1562, at Wivelscombe, Somerset.
1.1. Richard Harris, m. Elianor Bennett, sister of Edward Bennett, at Wivelscombe. Edward Bennett, bapt. 2 Feb. 1577, in Wivelscombe; later of of St Olave, Southwark, London, and Lawn’s Creek, Virginia. His da. Alice Bennett, bapt. in St Olave, m. John Hardy; their dau., Lucy Hardy, m. Hodges Council. Elianor Bennett and Edward Bennett were siblings of Thomas Bennett, d. 1616, at Wivelscombe, father of: (1) … Bennett, who m. Richard Jackson, who patented 450 acres in IOW adj, to Justinian Cooper. Their da., Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, who patented 500 acres on July 17, 1648 ‘lying on east side of Lawne’s Creek extending to main river and along the great river to the creek dividing the same from land of Alice Bennett’. George Hardy was an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677. (2) Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710, who lived at Blackwater Richard Bennett’s first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife.
1.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, at Wivelscombe. (St Andrew). (Was it he who d. 1672?).
1.1.1.1. John Harris bapt. 18 Feb. 1624,at Wiveliscombe, d. 1686, Virginia; a fair suggestion?
1.1.1.1.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of 2nd husband Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710. Robert Lancaster Sr. and Nicholas Sessums appraised the estate of Henry Baker, 27 April 1701. Nicholas Sessums emigrated from Bristol, the West country Port in which the Bennetts of Wivelscombe became established. He probably m. 1. Hannah Culmer, the widow of Robert Lane and da. of Thomas Culmer. Nicholas Sessoms had issue: 1. Thomas, who named one of his sons Culmer. 2. Mary, d. 1742, m. (1704) William Blake, as shown here: ‘Nicholas Sessums of Lawnes Creek Parish, to his daughter, Mary Blake the wife of William Blake of the same, for love and affection’ (D.B. 5, p. 302).
1.1.1.2. Thomas Harris. (Was it he who d, 1668, in Virginia?).
1.1.1.2.1. William Harris, nephew of John Harris, who rented his lands during his orphanage? If so, a rather more tricky analysis of any of William’s descendants ensues than is generally accepted.

William Newsom was probably of the family of Peter Newsam, s.l. 1638, who witnessed the Will of Richard Hynde, which was proved on December 12, 1625: ‘Hynde, Richard, of St Saviour, citizen and salter of London’. His Will names Ann, his wife, ‘John Hynde, Richard Hynde, and William Hynde, his underage sons. Executor: Ann his wife. Witnesses: Nicholas Kinge; Peter Newsam, scrivener (who prepared legal documents, often regarding loans). Overseers: Stephen Streete of London, grocer; ‘Ralph Yardly of London‘, who was the father of Governor Yardley of Virginia (TNA, Prob.11/147, f).

Many Somerset families, the Bennetts and Hodges, as examples, had residences in St. Olave, Southwark; the main gateway to the burgeoning trade with Virginia.

As I have recorded elsewhere, the Lancasters were squires of Cheddar, and held land in nearby Wedmore, Somerset, where many of the Harris family were their tenants. Yes, tenants!; they were not suckled on the silver spoons of the Earls of Northumberland; rather on 20 or so milking cows that grazed the Somerset Marshes.

Such tenants were the Tuckes:

1.
1.1. William Tucke, m. Christian Holman, 18 July 1571, at Barwick, St Mary Magdalene, Somerset.
1.1.1. Thomas Tucke, m. Mary Collins, 26 Jan. 1604, Barwick.
1.1.1.1. James Tooke. December 1634, William Lacey leased James Tooke 500 acres on the east side of Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris (probable father of Edward Harris, d. 1677 ), all my right and title to this lease.
1.1.1.2. Thomas Tooke, b. c. 1610, m. 1. Avis Mascoll, 7 June 1634, Barwick; 2. Mary … He witnessed the Will of William Ridley, with Thomas Harris, d. 1672.
1.1.1.3. Elizabeth Tooke, m. Michael Ezell.
1.1.1.3.1. Elizabeth Ezell, m. John Atkinson Jr, son of John Atkinson and Ann Holliman. John Atkinson was the br. of James Atkinson, d. in IOW after 28 July 1723, who m. Mary Holliman. John and James Atkinson were stepsons of Thomas Pitman, born of his third wife, Martha … by her first husb., Thomas Atkinson.
1.1.2. Joane Tucke, m. William Penny, 22 Sept. 1588, Barwick.
1.1.2.1. Dorothy Penny, m. William Pitman, 10 Sep 1609 Horsington (St John); 15 mls fr. Barwick.
1.1.2.1.1. Thomas Pitman, of Virginia, b. c. 1614, by his deposition.

Robert Lancaster: appraised the estates of William Newsum, Mathew Swann, William Newitt. His Will, R. 23 May 1720, named his da. Elizabeth Pitman, wife of Thomas Pitman, grandchildren Samuel, Lettis and Ann Pitman.

Drew cont.

1.2.1.1.1. Thomas Drewe.
1.2.1.1.1.1. Mary Drew, m. (175, in NC) Henry Harris, son of Thomas Harris and Judith Edwards.
1.2.1.1.2. Newitt Drew, m. Mary Purcell.
1.2.1.1.2.1. Ann Drew, m. Benjamin Lane.
1.2.1.1.2.1.1. William Lane, d. after 22 Jan. 1786, Halifax, NC.
1.2.1.1.2.1.1.1. Jane Lane, m. Henry Eelbeck, son of Montfort Eelbeck and Mary Rogers.
1.2.1.1.2.2. Mary Drew, m. John Harris, son of Robert Harris and Ann Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset.
1.2.1.1.2.2.1. Drew Harris.
1.2.1.1.2.2.2. Newitt Harris.
1.2.1.1.3.John Drew, m. Elizabeth Swann. (This gives the clue as to who were the true descendants of Martin Thorne, yet, God preserve genealogical applecarts!).
1.2.1.1.3.1. Mary Drew, m. (1715) Nicholas Smith, son of Richard Smith, who in his will, of 24 Feb. 1712, gave to Elizabeth Boon and Richard Sessoms each a cow. (A connection to John Harris, d. 1686).
1.2.1.1.3.1.1. James Smith, b. 1727, Bertie, NC, m. 1. Millie Turner, da. of Thomas Turner, 2. Sarah Hill, da. of Richard Hill and Margery Gilliam.
1.2.1.1.3.1.1.1. Lucy Smith, m. 1. Thomas Langley, 2. Reuben Norfleet, son of Marmaduke Norfleet Sr., father-in-law of James Harris, as given elsewhere.
1.2.1.1.3.1.2. Drew Smith, d. aft. 22 Feb. 1762, in Halifax, NC.
1.2.1.1.3.1.2.1. Temperance Smith, m. (1758) Philip Alston, son of Joseph John Alston and Elizabeth Chauncey.
1.2.1.1.3.1.2.1.1. Philip Alston Jr., b. 11 Dec. 1778 (Halifax), m. Nancy Ramsay, da. of John Ramsay.
1.2.1.1.3.1.2.1.1.1. Mary Drew Alston, m. 2. William Harris, of Telfair, Georgia.

Generally, the connections are so very dense. People attempt to claim their ancestors live d on a particular street, yet the nearest you can get to this street is the city it was in, but the case for Sergeant John Harris gets stronger, I think.

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SOME HARRIS NOTES

It is impossible to understand settler families of America without understanding their origins, and their kinship associations in England, which were invariably repeated in America.

These notes commence with ‘trimmed’ versions of the genealogies of those families of Somerset, England, which were connected to the Harris family of Somerset and Virginia. They only skim the complexity of relationships. It would be easy to show marriages in Somerset between familes of Browne/Wall; Coomer/Wall; Reeve/Wall; Council/Wall; Harris/Wall; Hix/Wall; Marshall/Wall; Hickes/Howe; Hodges/Howe, and to account for families of Peterson and Parham.

The degree of intermarriages between families of this kinship group was bewildering to a modern persective, as any study of relevant parish registers will attest.

I have constructed the Harris pedigree herein given by taking into account a fact and a principle; the former being that the Somerset elite held land in various parishes (the Symes in Nunney and Wedmore, for example), and this gave tenant families (Harris, etc.) a geographical freedom of tenure, so what appear to be seperate families of Harris are, in fact, the same. The genealogical principle is one of retrospective analysis – how can family relationships of one generation be understood by reference to relationships of previous ones? That is, adjoining land owners in England of the same generation and of different names were almost invariably br.-in-law or cousins; those of a differnt generation, either uncles or nephews. It could not have been any different in Virginia. When the same ‘collection of names’ appear in previous generations, as neighbors, there is a clear continuation of association, in which relationships between a former and latter generations can be assumed with a high degree of accuracy.

The answer is in the soil, as a famous historian once remarked.

There was clearly a closer degree of association between the family of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and that of the Bennetts (and Harris) of Wivelscommbe than I have previously supposed.

These notes suggest that conventional constructions of some Harris pedigrees may be off-target.

WALTON
The Walton family of Brunswick Co., Virginia, resided in the Glastonbury area of Somerset, England. They took their name from the village of Walton, which is 3¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Glastonbury. Immediately west of Glastonbury are the villages of High Ham, Shapwick, and Meare, the first being 9 miles from the last, with Shapwick being between them, on a north/south axis. The Waltons lived at Low Ham Court, being present there until 1666. ).

They were of the upper echelons of the Somerset landed gentry, alongside such as the Hodges, Lancasters, Symes (Simms) and Wiches. A lesser member of the latter family, Edward Wiche, who married Sara Chapman, 9 Feb. 1640, in Bridgwater, 10 miles from High Ham, was the ancestor of Abigail Wyche, as I have shown elsewhere, who m. George Brewer, 4 March 1734, son of George Brewer and Sarah Lanier, half-sister of Sampson Lanier Sr., who m. Elizabeth Washington; their son, Thomas Lanier, m. Anne Maclin, dau. of William Maclin Sr. and Katherine Brewer.

The connection to these families of such as the Harris family of Cheddar (15 miles from High Ham) was based on a shared locality, and a desire of the tenants of the landed gentry to marry into their families. As it was in England, so it continued in colonial America. As given elsewhere, George Walton, bapt. 9 Mar. 1657, in Meare, ‘f. Edward and Mary’, was almost certainly the father of George Walton, gent, b. c. 1682, d. 31 Oct. 1766, who m. Elizabeth Rowe, d. 1785, in Brunswick Co.; their son being Isaac Rowe Walton, d. 22 Oct. 1770, in Menherrin Parish, Brunswick Co., who m. Elizabeth Ledbetter. Their son, David Walton, born in 1760 in Brunswick Co. died 9 May 1848, m. (28 Feb. 1778) Rebecca Wyche having issue: Henry Walton, who m. (1775), Rebecca Brewer.

CHAPMAN/HICKS
Bath is abt. 25 mls fr. Wedmore/Cheddar, where the Hickes interm. with the likes of the Cowncell family, and were, thus, of some status. The Chapmans were an influential and long established family of Bath. (See Transcript of indenture of lease between (1) Henry VIII and (2) Richard Chapman of Bathe, Somerset, clothier: of property in Somerset. (Nat. Arch. ref. LR 15/136).

Bath, Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, i.e. Bath Abbey:
1. Thomas Chapman/Elizabeth Kinge, 28 Jul. 1573.
1.1. William Chapman, bapt. 28 Sept. 1577.
1.1.1. William Chapman, Glover, m. Margaret …
1.1.1.1. John Chapman, bapt. 4 Feb. 1615, m. Edith Hickes, 14 Apr. 1645.
1.1.1.2. Katherine Chapman, bapt. 17 Nov. 1611, m. Richard Mayo, 19 Oct. 1640.
1.1.1.3. William Chapman, bapt. 7 Sept. 1609.
1.1.1.3.1. Anne Chapman, bapt. 27 Jul. 1647, m. Walter Hickes, 4 Feb. 1676.
1.1.1.3.1.1. Robert Hickes, bapt.13 Mar. 1683. 6 March 1738.
1.1.1.3.1.2. Mr. John Hickes, b. c. 1684, m. 1. Mary. Will of John Hicks, dated the 30th day of September, 1728, and proved 20 Aug.1729 … ‘& my will & desire is that my son John Hicks go and live with my son-in-law John Rose’. The Rose family were intermarried with the Lancasters, squires of Cheddar.
1.1.1.3.1.2.1. John Hickes, bapt. 24 Jan. 1706.
1.1.1.3.1.2.2. James Hickes, bapt. 17 Feb. 1713.
1.1.1.3.1.2. Mr. John Hickes, m. 2. …
1.1.1.3.1.2.1. Daniel Hickes, b. c. 1720. Indenture made 25 Jan. 1745, between Thomas Hicks of the Province of North Carolina and Nathaniel Edwards of Brunswick Co … Witnesses: John Wall, Jr., George Hicks, James Hicks, Jr. (son of George), John Irby, Jr. Henry Bedingfield, Francis Price. Court 6 Feb. 1745. (ibid. p. 141)
1.1.1.3.1.2.2. Abigail Hickes, m. John Rose.

HOUSE
1.
1. Thomas Howse, m. Susana Hixe, 28 May 1638, in Compton Martin, Somerset (St Michael the Archangel).
1.1. Thomas House, m. Francis Millard on 29 May 1664, in Compton Martin, she bapt. 10 June 1628, da. of Henry Millard and ‘Alison Hickes‘, who m. on 16 Apr. 1621. The Millard and Hix families were of the many threads that bound a densely-woven kinship network, including those of Harris, Hodges and Cowncell, which inhabited the swampy lands near Wedmore, Somerset. It is not an exaggeration to state that everyone was a cousin of sorts of everyone else.
1.1.1. James House, bapt. 1 Sept. 1666, Compton Martin. John Duke and John Taylor Duke witnessed the will of James House in Brunswick, 9 Feb. 1735.
1.1.1.1. Thomas House, bapt. 19 Mar. 1692, Compton Martin; f. James & Sarah.
1.1.1.2. James House, bapt. 13 Mar. 1697, in Compton Martin, f. James & Sarah.
1.1.1.2.1. Isaac House. Indenture made 5 June 1746 betw. Isaac House of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., and Richard Ransom of same, £35, North side of the three Creeks, 84a. Signed Isaac House. Witnesses: John Wall, Junr., James Maclin, son of William Maclin.

WALL TIMELINE
1.John Wall, m. Elizabeth Rowe, 5 Apr. 1627, Wedmore (St Mary). 4 Feb. 1664. Prob. of will of Capt Jno. Wall decd. to Elizabeth Wall the relict. Will proved by oaths of Capt Fran. Grey & Richard Price.
2.Feb. 1694. Ordered that Henry Wyche and John Wall view a tobacco house built by John King for Edward Chilton and report how they find it at next court.
3. Mar. 1694. Order of last court for Henry Wyche and John Wall to view a house built by Henry King for Edward Chilton is recorded.
4.Sarah Wall m. George Wyche, of Sussex Co.
5. John Wall, 970 acs., Brunswick Co.; on S. side of Maherin River; adj. John Carrell; Leadbetter’s Path; David Crawley; & George Walton’s land; 31 Oct. 1726. 200 acs. part granted him, 11 July 1719.
6. June 1744. To John Wall & William Macklin three thousand acres lying on Terrible Creek being a Branch of Staunton River in Brunswick beginning at John Wall’s upper Camp on the said Creek thence up & down for quantity.
7. Will. 7 May 1744. I, Frances Hicks of B., being sick and weak but in perfect senses I order that no appraisement be made of my estate. Signed Frances Hicks. Wit. John Wall, Henry Beddingfeild, William Beddingfeild.

COUNCIL
1.
1.1. John Cowncell, bapt. 1573.
1.1.1. John Cowncell, bapt 28 Nov. 1601, f. Joannis Counsell, m. Mary Coomer, 26 Nov 1631; the sister of Agnes Coomer, who m. John Harris in the adj. parish of Cheddar, 4. Feb. 1635.
1.1.1.1. Johanna Cowncell, bapt. 28 Nov. 1601 (twin), m. (1) Philip Lawrence, 20 Aug. 1618, (2) John Chapman, 26 April 1624.
1.1.1.2. William Cowncell, bapt. 5 Aug. 1610, m. Mary Hayne.
1.4.4. Richard Cowncell, bapt. 3 Sept. 1613 (Blackford), m. (1) Joan Taylor, 12 Aug. 1640, (2) Elizabeth Hix, 12 Aug. 1647, dau. of William Hix and Grace Morton, m. 23 Jan. 1625, and niece of Margaret Hix, who m. Simon Day, 14 Jan. 1632.
1.4.4.1. Hodges Counsell. Hodges Counsell was the very likely son of Richard Counsell, by either his first or second wife. Richard Counsell was the br.-in-law of Susan Lancaster, and Hodges Counsell may have received his Christian name after her husband, William Hodges (a member of the very influential Hodges family, squires of Wedmore), who was probably his Godfather. Hodges Council d. bef. 9 Aug. 1699, named as husband of Lucy Hardy in the Will of John Hardy, (B. 2, p. 419), m Alice Bennett. Hodges Council. Leg. eldest son Hodges land on Blackwater, son John the land I bought of Robert Lawrence (ibid. p. 409). Robert Lawrence Sr. was very likely the son of Philip Lawrence, who m. Joan Counsell, 20 Aug. 1618, Wedmore, the probable aunt of Richard Counsell. Hodges Council’s son, Hardy, m. Susannah Fulgham, dau. of Michael Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset. Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, m. Anne Fulgham, Susannah’s sister.

BENNETT
1. Robert Bennett, a tanner, of Wivelscombe, m. Elizabeth Edney.
1.1. Thomas Bennett, d. 1616, Wivelscombe.
1.1.1. Thomas Bennett, claimed in 1635 as a headright by his uncle, Governor Richard Bennett.
1.2. Edward Bennett, baptised February 2, 1577, in Wivelscombe; later of of St Olave, Southwark, London, and Lawn’s Creek, Virginia.
1.2.1. Alice Bennett, m. John Hardy. Nugent, C&P vol. 1, p. 569: Mr. John Hardie 1150 acres IOW Co., 5 June 1666. Beginning at upper corner tree of Mathew Tomlin’s old land, running SSE by Wm. Westwrayers land &c. SW on Mathew Tomlins new land. John Hardy m. 2. Alice Tucker, widow of Arthur Allen. Her daus. were Katherine Allen, who m. Robert Johnson, and Joan Allen, who m. Dr Robert Williamson, John Burnett, and Reuben Proctor.
1.2.1.1. Lucy Hardy, m. Hodges Council.
1.1.2. … Bennett, m. Richard Jackson, who patented 450 acres in IOW adjacent to Justinian Cooper.
1.1.2.1. Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, who patented 500 acres on July 17, 1648 ‘lying on east side of Lawne’s Creek extending to main river and along the great river to the creek dividing the same from land of Alice Bennett’. On 19 June 1666, he made a deed to land which belonged to his wife Mary whom he refers to as the ‘daughter of Richard Jackson, dec.’. Her sister, Sarah Jackson, m. Col. Arthur Smith II. George Hardy was an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677.
1.1.3. Richard Bennett. He lived at Blackwater, in the vicinity of the plantation of Justinian Cooper. In 1669, Thomas Wood, son of Arthur Wood and Sarah Wooten, his mother, ‘relict of Arthur deceased’, deeded him land as ‘Richard Bennett of Blackwater’. In 1666, Colonel Arthur Smith made a deed to land at ‘Blackwater’ inherited by his wife, Sarah Jackson, from her ‘grandmother Alice Bennett’. Richard Bennett’s first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife.
1.3. Elianor Bennett, m. Richard Harris, son of William Harris, who m. Dorothy West, Aug. 31, 1562, at Wivelscombe, Somerset.
1.3.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, November 20, 1623, at Wivelscombe.
1.3.1.1. Thomas Harris, d. 1672.
1.3.1.1.1. Thomas Harris. Deborah Portis Widow of John Portis, appoints Richard Bennett, son of Richard Bennett, Sr. and Thomas Harris, her attorneys. Wits: Francis Floyd, Thos. Wilson, Benj. Drewit. Rec. Nov 21, 1704. IOW B. 2, pp. 16-17.

HARRIS
1.Thomas Harrys of Mells, carpenter, b. 1494.
1.1. John Harris. ‘Joannes Harries de Alverton’ (juxta Wedmore) d. 1585, m. 1. Joanna, d. 1579, 2. Alicia, d. 1585.
1.1.1. William Harris, m. Dorothy West, 31 Aug. 1562, at Wivelscombe.
1.1.1.1. Richard Harris, m. Elianor Bennett, sister of Edward Bennett, of Lawne’s Creek.
1.1.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, Wivelscombe. This Thomas Harris was probably he who d. in 1672, in Virginia. Judith may have been the da. of Richard Blake and Edith Pitt, m. 4 Nov. 1598, Wedmore, and sister of Joan Blake, who m. Robert Pope, 6 Feb. 1622, Wedmore.
1.1.1.1.2. Richard Harris.
1.1.1.1.2.1. John Harris, bapt. 18 Feb. 1624, Wivelscombe, ‘son of Richard’, probably he who d. in 1687, in Virginia.
1.1.1.1.2.1.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of 2nd husband Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710.
1.1.1.1.3. Elizabeth Harris, m. George Hill, 27 Jan. 1619, in Mells.
1.1.1.1.3.1. Nicholas Hill, who, on 30 Sept. 1664, patented 750 ac. in the Upper Parish, part of the estate of Edward Bennett.
1.1.1.1.4. John Harris, bapt. 17 Feb 1587, in Mells (St Andrew), m. (1) Grace Haine, in 1608, in Mells. If this is Sergeant John Harris of Virginia, he had remarried before emigrating. If he had a son by Grace Haine, (Thomas) born c. 1609-1612, it is possible that he was apprenticed at the time of his father’s arrival in Virginia, and did not accompany him, and this apprenticeship was in St Olave, Southwark, London, where an influential kinsman, Edward Bennett, of Wivelscombe, Somerset, and Virginia, had established himself; alongside such families as the Feltons, and Hodges (of Wedmore). Furthermore, if Grace Haine was of the Haine family of Wedmore, then a kinship connection to the Council and Hodges families of that place is established. (2) Mary Tomlin, 9 Nov. 1620, in Mells. Matthew Tomlin of the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County to John Johnson of the same parish, ‘for a valuable consideration’, a 225-acre tract ‘commonly called Pigneck’, bounded by Thomas Harris’s corner tree, pp. 570-571. (3) A third wife, in Virginia.
1.1.1.1.4.1. Thomas Harris, m. Alice West, October 1635, in Nunney (juxta Mells), d. in Charles City in 1677. At a court held Sept. 13, 1677, administration of the estate of Thomas Harris, deceased, was granted to John Echols and John Hardaway, probable brs.-in-law of the said Thomas Harris. Alice West was probably she who was bapt. 16 Sept., in Bath (St Michael), 12 miles from Nunney, and probable dau. of William West, who m. Katharine Pearce, 23 May 1608, in Bath (St Michael).
1.1.1.1.4.1.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 14 Aug. 1636, in Nunney.
1.1.1.1.4.1.1.1. William Harris, m. Mary Short, granddau. of William Short (and Mary Rookings,* da. of William Rookings Sr.), who originally lived in Charles City Co., on the south side of the James River (later Prince George Co.); he repatented 1100 acres of land ‘above the head of Chippokes Creek about one and one-half miles up the western most branche’, identifying himself as ‘the son and heir of William Shorts’. The land had been granted to Robert Moseley on Jan. 7, 1649, and then assigned to William Short Sr., on 28 Oct. 1657. (See Tidewater Families of Virginia, p. 544). This was the land identified as adjoining that of Sergeant John Harris: ‘William Lea and Alice (Feltham), his wife, to William Heath (Mary’s maternal grandfather), 150 acres … formerly Thomas Felton’s (son of Robert Feltham, vintner, of St. Olave, Southwark, London), deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia commonly called Upper Chippoakes in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Moseleys, adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry Co. from Charles Cittie County … one hundred and fifteen acres of said land lyeth in Charles Cittie County adjoining unto the rest of the divident which lyeth in said surry County … Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings’. (Dated 4 Oct. 1660. Surry Co. Court Records, R. 10 November 1660). *Mary Rookings was the sister of Maj. William Rookings, who was sentenced to death in 1677. His Will mentions his cousin, Mary Short’s children. Overseers and guardians were his brother-in-law, Capt. Nicholas Wyatt, of Charles City, and neighbours William Simmons and John King, of Upper Chippokes, all Bacon’s supporters.
1.1.1.1.4.1.1.2. Thomas Harris. On 3 March 1690, he petitioned that John Echols be summoned to the next court, perhaps to claim against the surviving executor of his grandfather’s estate.
1.1.1.2.1.2. John Harris, bapt. 1640, in Nunney (record faint).
1.1.2. John Harris, m. Joan Stubbs, 10 Feb. 1569, Wedmore. She was the da. of John Stubbs, and the aunt of John Stubbs, who m. Alice Vowles (the relict of William Giles), 30 June 1606, in Wedmore. Alice Vowles was the da. of Walter Vowles, d. 17 Feb. 1612. and his first wife, Johanna Chalcroft, m. 8. Nov. 1571. The Vowles family were much intermarried with the Browne family of Wedmore, and with those of Lawrence, Webb and Millard; the Webbs intermarried with the Harris; the Millards with the Councils and Hodges.
1.1.2.1. John Harris, d. 1625.
1.1.2.1.1. Robert Harris. He was probably this Robert Harris: December 1634, William Lacey leased James Tooke 500 acres on the east side of Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease.
1.1.2.1.1.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, Wedmore, ‘son of Robert’; probably he who d. in 1677, in Virginia.
1.1.2.2. Thomas Harris.
1.1.2.2.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, Cheddar, ‘son of Thomas’, probably he who d. in 1688, in Virginia, rather than his kinsman and namesake, bapt. 14 Aug. 1636, in Nunney. (However, please refer to footnote 1).
1.1.2.2. John Harris, m. Agnes Coomer, and their descendants may have settled in Virginia alongside their cousins.

BENNETT/BLAND
1. Robert Bennett, m. a dau. of Richarde Edneye, of Wivelscombe, Somerset, Vintner.
1.1. Thomas Bennett.
1.1.1. Richard Bennett. PROB 11/351/440: Will of Richard Bennett of Nansemond River, Virginia. 3 Aug. 1676.
1.1.1.1. Anne Bennett, b. 1641, m. (1) Theodorick Bland, of Westover, (2) Col. St. Leger Codd, of Northumberland Co. Anne Bennett was the da. of Richard Bennett and Maryann Utie (relict of John Utie), who was governor of Virginia from 1652 to 1655.
1.1.1.1.1. Theodorick Bland (born 1663); m. Margaret Mann, who was highly likely to be of the same family as Thomas Mann: Thomas Joyner, br. of Bridgeman Joyner, a guardian of an orphan of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, bequested in his Will, R. 9 Aug. 1708, ‘to wife Elizabeth the plantation where she now lives, at her death to son Thomas Joyner; Henry Turner – 200 acres’. Was his wife Elizabeth Mann?, dau. of Thomas: ‘Thomas Man and wife Elizabeth Man to Theophilus Joyner (neph. of Bridgeman), 150 acres on Blackwater River and bounded by William Mayo, Bridgeman Joyner and Hodges Counsell, Wit: William Mayo and Richard Booth. Rec: 9 June 1683. Sig. Thomas Man and Elizabeth Man.
1.1.1.1.1.1. James Bland, of Prince William Co., m. Mary Gwatkins, who was probably of the Gwatkins family of Thornbury, 11 mls fr. Bristol, and 40 mls fr. Wedmore, connected by a road that ran parallel to the Bristol estuary.

PITT
1. George Rodney.
1.1. Maurice Rodney, Esq., m. Joan, da. of Sir Thomas Dyer of Somerford, Co., Wilts.
1.1.1. Dorothy wife of Rice Davis* of the Middle Temple, and of Tickenham, Esq.
1.2. Agatha Rodney, m. Thomas Hodges, Esquire, of Wedmore, d. 1583.
William Pitt m. Mary Owen: Robert Owen, of Bristol, Merchant, whose Will was pr. Feb. 16, 1615 (8 Cope), and mentioned ‘cousin *Rice Davies, Esq.’ and ‘my brother in law William Pitt‘, who was his overseer. Rice Davies m. (1) Dorothy, da. of Maurice Rodney, Esq., and sister of Sir George Rodney. William Pitt’s son, Col. Robert Pitt, d. bef. 9 January 1674, IOW, was the father of John Pitt, who m. Olive, da. of John Hardy and Alice Bennett. She m. (1) Giles Driver; 2.John Bromfield, and 3. Lt. Col. John Pitt. It can not be known what relation Jane Rodney was to the aforementioned; she m. William Turner, on 28 May 1612, at Wedmore ; their son being John Turner, bapt. 14 May 1618. It was almost certainly he who d. aft. 25 Mar. 1705 in IOW Co., and who had m. Mary Tomlin. Thomas Harris, d. 1688, placed his son George with John Turner, whose spoken Will named named sons John, James, William, Joseph, Simon and grandd. Ann Everett; witnessed by Edward Harris, John Johnson, Jenkins Dorman, Wm Westray, and Mary Tomlin.

1. Thomas Pitt of Blandford Forum, North Dorset.
1.1. William Pitt, b. 1578, Bristol (encompasses North Somerset and South Gloucestershire); d. 25 Oct. 1624, in Bristol, Will pr. 3 Feb. 1625; m. Mary Owen: Robert Owen, of Bristol, Merchant. Will dated Sep. 5, 1614, Codicil Sep. 4, 1615, pr. Feb. 16, 1615-16. (8 Cope). My cousin *Rice Davies, esq. My brother in law William Pitt, overseer.
1.1.1. Col. Robert Pitt, d. bef. 9 January 1674, IOW.
1.1.1.1. Col. John Pitt, m. Olive, dau. of John Hardy and Alice Bennett. She m. 1. Giles Driver; 2.John Bromfield.
1.1.2. Captain Henry Pitt, of Pagan Creek, who m. 2. Anne, widow of Robert Watson. He d. c. 1666, as that year his widow m. Captain James Powell.
1.1.3. Thomas Pitt.
1.1.3.1. *Thomas Pitt.

DRIVER
1. Robert Driver.
1.1. Robert Driver, of Avening, (30 mls from Bristol), which is the next parish to Cherington, less than 2 mls distant. Cherington is 4 mls from Tetbury, and 6 mls from Kingscote. English county delineations can be misleading to American researchers. For instance, Avening is 65 mls from Wedmore, Somerset, and 90 mls from Wivelscombe, Somerset, on the main coastal route. They share the same regional and Bristol trade location.
1.1.1. Giles Driver (pale indented argent & azure, 2 lions rampant combatant countercharged), m. Dorothy Bayley, of Wheatenhurst, dau. of John Bayley. Giles Driver’s Will was probated 2 July 1639 (PROB 11/180/571).
1.1.1.1. John Driver, bur. 12 June 1681, in Avening, m. Elizabeth Bridger, bapt. Slimridge 5 Aug. 1638, bur. 28 Jan 1675; cousin of Joseph Bridger,* of Woodmanscote, in Dursley, 10 mls from Avening, who m. Hester Pitt. Joseph Bridger of Virginia made a bequest to his mother, Mary, still living in Dursley. One of the tenants of Woodmanscote was *Thomas Pitt, who may have been he who was transported to Virginia, in 1666, by Joseph Bridger.
1.1.1.2. Robert Driver.
1.1.1.2.1. Giles Driver, m. Elizabeth (Sharp) Reynolds.
1.1.1.2.1.1. Giles Driver, m. Mary Reynolds, whose will, R. 24 April 1721, named da. Mary House.

SYMES
1. …
1.1. Sir Thomas Horner, purchased the manor of Mells in 1544.
1.2. John Horner, gent., of Stoke St Michael, Somerset. The Horners were landlords of the Peace family:
1. … Peace.
1.1. John Peace, bur. 19 Oct. 1677.
1.2. Joseph Peace, bur. 8 Nov. 1672, a tenant of the Horner family of Stoke St Michael, Somerset
1.2.1. Joseph Peace.
1.2.1.1. James Peace, bapt. 2 Jul. 1682, Stoke St Michael. The Peace name was quite rare, but there are examples of Peace intermarriages with families of Selleck (1628), Randle (1650), Thomas (1658), Earle (1662), Mathewes (1672), Lewis (1682).
1.2.1.1. John Peace, bapt. 27 Mar. 1679, Stoke St Michael. He held 900 acs. on Tabbs Creek, Granville Co.
1.2.1.3.Joseph Peace, bapt. 27 Dec. 1675, Stoke St Michael.
1.2.1.3.1. Joseph Peace, b. c. 1700, a carpenter, paid William Smith £100 for 200 acs. at Ezekiel Fuller’s line on Tabb’s Creek, in June 1756 (B. 6, p. 59). Wit. Thos. Smith, Saml. Smith. On 2 May 1734. In May 1761, he purchased 420 acs. on Tabb’s Creek from Darwin Elwick (Gran. Co. B. d., pp. 250-251). On 11 April 1763, he sold his original 200 acres on Ezekiel Fuller’s line to John Mask, witnesses to were Robert Blackwell, his son Joseph Peace, and John Mask Jr. (Gran. Co. B. f., pp. 199-200). Joseph Peace of Granville Co. to John Dickerson. Power of Atty to collect debts, etc. Wit: John Smith, John Peace. (ibid.).
1.2.1. John Horner (Jack of the nursery rhyme), m. Muriell Malte, and after 1554 united the properties of his father and uncle. He was sheriff of Somerset in 1564 and 1573.
1.2.1.1. Dorothy Horner, m. John Hippisley, d. 1608; their great-great-grandson was associated with the Dickersons:
(1. Thomas Dickerson – a name particular to these parts.
1.1. Mary Dickerson, bapt. 19 Oct. 1623. Cheddar (St Andrew)
1.2. Thomas Dickerson.
1.2.1. Thomas Dickerson, bapt. 17 Jan. 1629, f.Thomas.
1.3.1.1. George Dickerson Jr. Hippisley v Dickerson. 1681. (Nat. Arch. ref. C 7/147/42).
1.2.2. Thomas Horner, of Cloford; inherited the manor of Mells; m. 2. Jane Popham. LWT proved 20 Sept. 1612.
1.2.2.1. Amy Horner. m. John Symes.
1.2.2.2. Henry Symes, 1609-1682, m. Anne Seymour, d. 1685.
1.2.2.3. Thomas Symes, 1621-1670, m. (3 June 1640) Amy Bridges, 1621-1662, dau. of Edward Bridges (d. 1639), esquire, of
1.2.2.4. Capt John Symes, member of the Council of Antigua, d. by 1687.
1.2.2.4.1. Thomas Symes Jr., evidenced here: Symes v Horner. Plaintiffs, Thomas Symes and Merrill Symes his wife. Defendants, Samuel Horner and Philip Horner. Subject: property in Mells, Somerset. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 5/64/111 1672).
1.2.2.4.1.1. ‘John Symes late of Montserrat, West Indies’. John Symes of Montserrat, in his will, dated 4 Feb. 1709, abstracted in Brown’s Abstracts of Somerset Wills, 1st. Series, p. 55, gives to his uncle, ‘Charles Symes of Compton-Martin, Somerset, Clerk, £1000; and provided further, ‘His son, William Symes, to be presented to the vicarage of Barwick’.
1.2.2.4.1.1.1. Elizabeth Symes (da., not sister), m. a kinsman, Samuel Perry. (See Nat. Arch., ref. C 11/750/12, 1714).
1.2.2.4.1.2. Richard Symes (See N&Q, 1890).
1.2.2.4.1.2.1. Adam Symes. (ibid.).
1.2.2.4.1.2.1.1. George Sims, of Brunswick Co.; d. Sept. 1763. He bought land from his br. John Sims, on 5 Nov. 1747, witnessed by Micajah Perry, a cousin.
1.2.2.4.1.2.1.1.1. Adam Sims, m. Elizabeth Walton, da. of George Walton of Brunswick Co., and who was, thus, the br.-in-law of Nathan Harris, grandson of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and br. of West Harris.

FULGHAM
1. William Fuljames, b. c. 1490 at Ing’s Manor, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, settled in Somerset; great-grandfather of:
1.1. John Fuljames, of Angersleigh, Somerset, m. (1603) Sarah Hole, of Barnstaple, Devon. He acquired Woodbrook Farm in Pitminster, an adjacent parish to Angersleigh, and became known as John Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Gent. The Hole family were intermarried with that of Norris: Thomas Hole & Edith Norris, 17 Jan 1602, Dulverton (All Saints).
1.1.1. Anthony Fuljames, born c. 1615 in Pitminster, married, first, in 1638 at Pitminster, Elizabeth Norris, b. 1623 in Bridgwater, Somerset.
1.1.1.1. John Fulgham, b. 1639, at Pitminster.
1.1.1. Anthony Fuljames, m. (2) Martha Greene.
1.1.1.2. Michael Fulgham, m. Anne Izzard.
1.1.1.2.1. Anne Fulgham, m. Robert Harris, son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688.
1.1.1.2.2. Susannah Fulgham, m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council Jr. and Lucy Hardy, in 1705. Her will was recorded October 6, 1757, naming daus. Susannah, Christian Daughtery, Mary Brantley, Martha Fowler, Lucy Johnson, and Ann Lawrence; sons Charles, Michael, Hardy, and Joshua; grandson Willis Council; and grandaus. Selah Council and Sarah Lawrence. Sons Charles and Joshua were named executors. The Will was witnessed by William Murphree and Robert Johnson.

BRANTLEY
The Brantley connection to a number of Somerset families stems from an early period: Edward Brantley, 675 ac. adj. land of Mr. England and Mr. Tooke, IOW., 30 Oct. 1669. Phillip Brantley: ‘tract of land and plantation situated lying and being in Isle of Wight County whereon the said Phillip Brantley dewleth 100 acres being part of a rant of 675 acres dated Oct 20, 1669 to Edward Brantley by the last will & testament and devised to said Phillip. 22 Feb. 1724. Witness: Joseph Chapman. Benjamin Brantley to John Davis, ‘tract of land lying in the upper parish on Lyons Creek 150 acres beginning at Smallock’s Gull and bounded on William Drew’s line to the River and so along the River to Barlow’s line and down the said line to the Crook and so up to 1st station. Witness: John Hodges. John Brantley to Joseph Atkinson, track of land lying and being on the East Side of the first Swamp of the Black Water containing by examination 100 acres of land which was by the last and will and testament of Edward Brantley deceased devised to his grandson Edward deceased, father of the said John Brantley, beginning at James Tooke Scott’s line thence along that line to John Miller’s line thence along the said Miller’s line to John Wrenn’s line and along his line to the line of land purchased by James Ingles of John Davis along the said Ingles’s line to the beginning’. Witness: John Person, John Dunkley, John Eley, James Holt.

PARKER
1. William Parker, m. Antonia Gibbs, 3 July 1589., br. of *Joan Parker, who, as stated, m. Richard Algar, 1 May 1577 br. of Flora Algar who m. John Turner, 26 Nov 1576.
1.1. William Parker: Edward Cook, 100 acs. in W. branch of Nanzemum Riv., adj. his own and land of William Parker. 17 Mar. 1654, p. 316. Trans, of 2 pers: James Cany, George Gourdon. Edward Cooke was bapt. 9 Sept. 1610, in Wedmore, son of Edward Cooke, bapt. 28 Oct. 1565 and Diana Hutchins, who m. 1 Aug. 1594.
1.2. Thomas Parker, m. Margaret Cooke, 9 March 1612, da. of the said Edward and Diana.
1.2.1. Richard Parker; d. bef. 23 Apr. 1681 in Nansemond Co.
1.2.1.1. Richard Parker, d. 1698-1704.
1.2.1.1.1. Richard Parker: Granted 304 acres near the head of Bennett’s Creek.
1.2.1.1.1. Peter Parker, named in the Will of his father (1749), as was his br., Jonathon Parker, who was a jurist in a trial concerning James Bland, as follows.
1.2.1.1.1.1. Thomas Parker, d. 1782.
1.2.1.2. Thomas Parker: 23 Apr. 1681: Thomas Duke 430 acs. Up Par. of Nazemond ‘Neare Thomas Harrell: adj. Thomas Parker: the Cross Sw.; & 200 acs. formely belonging to William Wright & 200 acs. granted sa. Wright 18 Mar. 1662 who conveyed to sd. Duke; 230 acs. for trans. of 5 pers. Tho. Duke , Tho. Duke, Fra. Marr, Jno. Deverett, Wm Harring. (B.2, p. 221).
1.2.1.2.1. Thomas Parker, m. Sarah Norfleet; first-cousin of:
1. Thomas Norfleet (m. Ruth Blount) bought adjoining land from Robert Council (NC. Edg. Co. D.B. 1., p. 204), and was mentioned as a neighbour of Robert Council and Thomas Turner (J. Bryan Grimes, Abstracts of North Carolina Wills, p. 17).
1.1. Marmaduke Norfleet.
1.1.1. Elizabeth Norfleet, m. James Harris in Halifax Co, NC., son of: James Harris, Will pr. 10 Jan. 1749, as follows.

BROWN
1.
1.1. Richard Brown, m. Elizabeth Hicks, 23 Dec. 1690, Compton Martin. (The Brown family were also established at Wedmore, as given).
1.1.1. Richard Brown, bapt. 10 Jan 1692.
1.2. John Brown, m. Jane, Compton Martin Reg.
1.2.1. John Brown, bapt. 14 Jul. 1681, Compton Martin. John Brown, the elder of Surry Co. conveyed land to Robert Hix the younger, 1735. (ibid., p. 191). Noah Brown fr. Wm. Moore land granted Thomas Cook 23 March 1715, 200 acres. Wit. John Duke, John Brown, Wm. Kimball, 13 Jul. 1735. (ibid. 224).
1.2.2.1. Richard Browne (probably m. Frances Sexton), and Wm. Eaton of Prince Georges Co., 455 a., adj. Henry Bates, John Duke, Adam Tapley, Wm. Hough, John Brown. Wit: John Brown, Noah Browne, Frances Brown, wife of Richard, concurs to sale. Apr. 4, 1737. B. I, p. 325.
1.2.2.1.1. John Brown. This Indenture made this 21st Day of October 1790 between Freeman Jordan of the Co. of Brunswick of the one part & Randall Rhodes of the Co. aforesaid of the other part … one tract of land containing one hundred & seventy eight acres …situate lying and being the Co. of Brunswick in the Parish of Saint Andrews on the South side of Little Cedar Creek and bounded as follows beginning at Thomas Harriss corner white oak … thence up the branch to Henry Maclins corner poplar on the same thence along his line … to his corner Hickory on Little Cedar Creek. Signed by Freeman Jordan and Ann Jordan, and witnessed by Jesse Turner, Arthur Smith, John Brown, and William Barrow. 25 July 1791. (B. 15, p. 110).
1.2.2.2. Burwell Brown, LWT pr. 27 Mar. 1756. 1732-1737, Brunswick Court Orders: Robert Hicks Jr., Burrell Brown, Batt Peterson, and Matthew Parham ordered to appraise the estate of John Smith dec’d. 7 Aug. 1740: He was security for Burchet Turner, administratrix of Joseph Turner dec’d. The Court ordered her, the now Mrs. Edward Green and her husband, to make up an account of her Admin. of the Estate and return to the same court. 1748, Bruns. Co. Court Records: Burrell Brown Gent. took a list of tithtables in the lower eastern part on the SS of the Meherrin. 1 July 1740: Indenture between James Parham to Bertie Province NC. and John Tooke of Surry Co. for 5 shillings a tract of 440 acres on the N. side of Fountaine Creek; Brunswick Co., except 100 acres to Jeremiah Brown granted by patent 2 Feb. 1724 to said James Parham. Wit: Batt Peterson, John Peterson, Burwell Brown, Edward Green, John Bishop, James Judkins. (B. 2, p. 63).
1.2.2.2. Burwell Brown, LWT pr. 27 Mar. 1756. 1732-1737, Brunswick Court Orders: Robert Hicks Jr., Burrell Brown, Batt Peterson, and Matthew Parham ordered to appraise the estate of John Smith dec’d. 7 Aug. 1740: He was security for Burchet Turner, administratrix of Joseph Turner dec’d. The Court ordered her, the now Mrs. Edward Green and her husband, to make up an account of her Admin. of the Estate and return to the same court. 1748, Bruns. Co. Court Records: Burrell Brown Gent. took a list of tithtables in the lower eastern part on the SS of the Meherrin. 1 July 1740: Indenture between James Parham to Bertie Province NC. and John Tooke of Surry Co. for 5 shillings a tract of 440 acres on the N. side of Fountaine Creek; Brunswick Co., except 100 acres to Jeremiah Brown granted by patent 2 Feb. 1724 to said James Parham. Wit: Batt Peterson, John Peterson, Burwell Brown, Edward Green, John Bishop, James Judkins. (B. 2, p. 63).

The Thomas Harris of Little Cedar Creek was very probably a kinsman of Isham Trotter, who m. Jenny Burch, 22 Nov. 1773, in Brunswick; their da., Martha, m. Thomas Brown, 24 Oct. 1803. Jenny Burch was the sister of Elizabeth Burch, wife of William Lanier, son of Thomas Lanier and Ann Maclin, da. of William Maclin, as per will of 1751. Thomas Lanier was the uncle of Rebecca Lanier, wife of Walton Harris. Thomas Harris was a neighbour of Isham Trotter: This Indenture made the twentieth Day of April 1787 between William Buckhannon of the Co. of Dinwiddie and Edward Holloway and his wife of the County of Meclinburg of the one part and Isham Trotter of the Co. of Brunswick and parish of Saint Andrews of the other part … One certain tract and parcel of land lying in the Co. of Brunswick and Parish of Saint Andrews and adjoining the lands of Isham Trotter, Thomas Harris and the lands of James Crook and James McKenny and Isaac Jones. (B. 14, p. 294).

The Maclins of Brunswick were closely associated with families originating in Somerset, England, as these marriages attest:

William Maclin, Jr., to Sally Clack (da. of James Clack), 25 Sept. 1754.
James Wyche to Leah Maclin, 23 Jan. 1755.
Matthew Parham to Rebecca Maclin, 25 Nov. 1755.
William Sims to Elizabeth Wall, 23 April 1770.
Thomas Clements to Ann Maclin (da. of John Maclin), 2 Dec. 1772.
Col. John Maclin to Anne Cryer, 29 March 1773.
Henry Robinson to Mary Clack, 30 Sept. 1772.
John Hardaway to Elizabeth Maclin (da. of Col. Frederick Maclin), 21 Feb. 1788.
Joseph Maclin to Nancy Walker (da. of David Walker), 14 March 1796.
Edmund Collier to Judith Hicks, 6 Jan. 1796.

Mary Maclin late relict of Wm. Mattox deceased bequested to grandson William House, granddaughter Mary House. 5 Feb. 1746.
Witness: John Maclin.

MARSHALL
Elizabeth Lawrence/Willyam Marshal, 25 Jan. 1586, Chedzoy, St Mary.
Elizabeth Hobbes/John Marshall, 14 Jul. 1586, Meare, St Mary. ***
Joane Marshall/Thomas Turner, 31 Mar. 1600, Taunton, St Mary.
Katherin Marshall/Walter Browne, 3 Nov. 1604, Taunton, St Mary. ***
Elizabeth Cooke/Roger Marshall, 29 Jun. 1608, Frome, St John the Baptist.
Ann Marshall/Edward Gilham, 16 Nov. 1608, Stogursey, St Andrew.
Mary Marshall/John Cary, 21 Sep. 1612, Othery, St Michael.
Joan Parker/Justinian Marshall, 30 Jan. 1636, Shepton Montague, St Peter.
Jane Marshall/Robert Goff, 14 Nov. 1664, Cheddar, St Andrew. ***
Francis Marshall/Thomas Hodges, 18 May 1675, Milton Clevedon, St James.***
Elizabeth Day/John Marshall, 28 Oct. 1681, Pawlett, St John the Baptist.
Sarah Penny/Abraham Marshall, 18 July 1683, Keynsham, St John.
Sarah England/George Marshall, 7 Dec. 1688, Trull, All Saints.
Elizabeth Hutchins/Nicholas Marshall, 27 Dec. 1698, Ilminster, St Mary. ***
Mary Marshall/Edward Wall, 1700, East Brent, St Mary the Virgin. ******

BURT
Joan Wiche/Thomas Burt, 12 May 1614, Beckington, St George. ******
Alice Couch/Robert Burt, 2 May 1627, Beckington, St George.
Magdalen Burt/Nathaniel Cooper, 14 Aug. 1630, Beckington, St George.
Katerne Turner/Edward Burt, 11 Mar. 1631, Ditcheat, St Mary Magdalene.
Marie Burt/Giles Edney, 29 Jun. 1637, Wiveliscombe, St Andrew. ******
Elizabeth Burt/Robert Gunn, 15 Oct. 1642, Wiveliscombe, St Andrew.
Joan Brewer/Nicholas Burt, 14 Aug. 1652, Bicknoller, St George. ******
Jane Burt/Francis Reede, 1 Jan. 1654, Wedmore, St Mary.
Eleanor Burt/George Wiche, 4 Jul. 1667, High Ham, St Andrew. ******
Elizabeth Burt/Samuell Garlish (n.b. Garish), 5 Nov. 1669, Taunton, St Mary.
Mary Godwin/Giles Burt, 16 Oct. 1671, Stoke St Gregory, St Gregory.
Frances Burt/William Perry, 12 Nov. 1683, Wellington, St John. ***
Elizabeth Row/Tobyas Burt, 17 May 1687, Martock, All Saints. ******
Joane Burt/John Harris, 17 Sep. 1691, Milborne Port, St John the Evangelist. ***
Joane Burt/Edward Bennett, 2 Oct. 1694, West Buckland, St Mary. ***
Fortune Burt/William Martin, 22 Sep. 1696, Northover, Ilchester. ******
Mary Burt/John Ballard, 19 Aug. 1700, Ditcheat, St Mary Magdalene. *********

 

DESCENDANTS OF THOMAS HARRIS

1. Thomas Harris, d. 1688.

1.1. Edward Harris, m. Mary Turner. His Will was pr. 25 March 1734, in IOW Co., witnessed by Thomas Atkinson and John Harris. He gave to his son, Edward, ‘land adj. John Johnson and John Turner, being land which was granted to my father, Thomas Harris’; son Jacob, land on the Flatt Swamp of the Meherrin River; sons Nathan (m. Catherine Walton, da. of Col. George Walton) and West Harris, the land granted me on the north side of Warwick Branch; son Daniel, da. Ann; da. Martha Williamson; son James.

1.1.1. West Harris.

1.1.1.1. Turner Harris.

1.1.1.1.1. Nathan Harris.

(1. James Jones.
1.1. Mary Jones, mentioned in Will of Christopher Lewis, 1673; m. (1) John Williams.
1.1.1. James, Charles. and John Williams; granted land in Prince George Co., 25 April 1702 (B. 9., p. 451). Charles was left land by his uncle-in-law, Thomas Chappell, in Surry Co.
1.1. Mary Jones m. (2) Richard Darden (Prince George, D&W, 1713-1728, p. 864).
1.2. Elizabeth Jones, m. (1) Thomas Chappell.
1.2.1. Samuel Chappell, b. 1696.
1.2.1.1. Christopher Columbus Chappell.
1.2.1.1.1. Samuel Chappell.
1.2.1.1.1.1. Rebecca Chappell, m. Nathan Harris.
1.2.1.1.2. Elizabeth Chappell, d. 1786 in Halifax Co, NC., m. John Heath, son of William Heath, d. 8 Nov. 1745 in Surry Co., br. of Susanne Short: The Will of William Short, probated Sept., 1741 in Surry County. The will mentions his wife, Susannah, his sons William and Thomas Short, da. Mary Harris, grandchildren William, Sarah, Martha (children of William Short); granddaughter Susanne (child of Thomas Short); son-in-law William Harris; William and Thomas Harris (grandsons). He also notes, kinsman Benjamin Heath, to whom he left two cows and calves. The witnesses were William Heath, Richard Jones and n.b Richard Bullock. The appraisers included John Mason, Christopher Tatum and William Heath).

Mary Turner’s siblings inc. (1) Thomas Turner Sr., who sold to Robert Council, 100 ac. on the south side of the Meherrin River. (NC. B.1 p. 17). He was granted land on Cypress Swamp, 13 Feb. 1724, witnessed by James Turner, and Joseph Wall. Thomas Turner Sr. was the father of Henry Turner. (2) James Turner, Will R. 1 Mar. 1743, names wife Hannah, and (son) Thomas Turner, daus. Charlet Turner, Penelope Turner; sisters Sarah Turner, Elizabeth Jordan, bro. (in-law) Burchet Green. Legatees: West Harris, Anne Turner. Thomas Turner, son of (br.) William, ex. Wit: John Betty, Batt Peterson, Francis Harris. (3) Joseph Turner, father of Simon Turner, who presented the Will of the said Francis Harris to Court. Simon Turner appr. estate of n.b. Richard Sikes, 7 March 1733, and witnessed the will of Robert Hicks, 7 Oct. 1736. Richard Sikes was probably related to Thomas Sikes, Will R. 9 Aug. 1708, witnessed by Robert Lawrence. Simon Turner m. 2. Ann Person. Francis Harris was the father of Mary (Harris) Person, wife of Henry Person , of Southampton Co.; son of John Person, Will R. 13 Feb. 1752, stating that he bought land from John Ledbetter in Granville Co., witnessed by Amos (sic) Garris. (Garlish

1.1.2. James Harris, d. 1749, br.-in-law of Matthew Joyner. 10 Jan. 1749. Feb. Court, 1749. Sons: James (‘my plantation’), Eli (Elias). Wife and Executrix: Cheary (sister of Mathew Joyner). Executor: Mathew Joyner. Witnesses: Wm. Skinner, John Blount, John Crumpton. (J. Bryan Grimes, Abstracts of North Carolina Wills, p. 153). Henry Turner: Feb. Court, 1748: Executor: Matthew Joyner. Witnesses: Matthew Joyner, James Harris, Marmaduke Norfleet. (ibid. p. 382). *Son of Thomas Joyner, Will dated 13 April 1740; the son of Thomas Joyner (br. of Bridgeman Joyner, the guardian of an orphan of Thomas Harris, d. 1688).

1.1.2.1. James Harris, m. Elizabeth Norfleet, in Halifax Co, NC, the da. Marmaduke Norfleet, son of Thomas Norfleet (m. Ruth Blount) who bought adjoining land from Robert Council (NC. Edg. Co. D.B. 1., p. 204), and was mentioned as a neighbour of Robert Council and Thomas Turner (Grimes, p. 17).

James and Elizabeth Harris are recorded (Halifax, May Court, 1771) as selling land to Charles Savage, witnessed by John Branch and Henry Eelbeck. 4 Apr. 1759: John and Ann Branch of Halifax Co. bought from Nathan Barrett 157 acres which was part of a grant to William Branch on 13 Oct. 1754, on the north side of Beaver Dam Swamp, joining John Alston.

2 Apr 1765: Division of the lands of Marmaduke Norfleet Jr., dec’d, son of Mr. Thomas Norfleet, dec’d. To John Young and Sarah his wife a tract of land where James Hogun now lives on Beaverdam Swamp and Cypress Swamp and 38 acres which was part of 114 acres joining Beaverdam and Blount. To James Harris and Elizabeth his wife her part of the estate, being part of a tract where James Hogun now lives (graves mentioned in the bounds) and 38 acres which was part of 114 acres joining Beaverdam Swamp, Blount, Joshua Bell. To Joshua Bell and Pheriby his wife her part of the estate a part of a tract where James Hogun lives joining Cypress Swamp, Wyatt and 38 acres which was part of 114 acres joining Beaverdam Swamp and Blount. 2 Apr 1765. Signed by William Williams, Moses Horne, Xpher Haynes, James Smith, Michl. Smalley, Oct. Ct. 1765.

The said William Branch, born 1719, was John’s father, and was Deputy Sheriff of Halifax Co., who, in July 1763, with William Hargrave, was an executor that gave bond with George Bristow for the will of Roger Taylor. The Will of William Hargrave, proved Feb. 1777, names wife Sarah all estate and at her death or marriage to all my children, exec. wife Sarah and sons John and Thomas. On 7 Oct. 1796, John Hargrove of Halifax Co. the only surviving exec. of William Hargrove dec’d. sells to William Hargrove 500 ac. which sd. William dec’d acquired from James Edmondson on Elk Marsh, Cade’s Branch, … ac. acquired from John Morris. Son John Hargrove m. (1) Judith, (2) Silvey Harris, widow of Elias Harris. Children of his first marriage inc. Brittain Hargrove, born 30 Nov. 1746 (Albemarle Parish Register), and Burrell Hargrove. In 1758, John Hargrove was granted lands in Halifax Co. on Gum Branch, adj. Wiggins Killibrew.

1753. James Reeves and his wife Millicent of Edgecombe Co., N.C. deeded to Bryant Edmondson of Edgecombe County, N.C. for 25 pounds current money of Virginia 200 on the south side of Great Quankey Creek. (Edgecombe Co. D.B. 4, p. 448). Bryant Edmondson was chain carrier for survey of a Granville grant to John Eelbeck, in Halifax Co., par. of Edgecombe, joining James Reeves, McCullock’s Corner and little Quankey Creek, 10 March 1760.

10 Dec. 1760: John Edmondson, planter, received a grant to 280 ac. in the par. of Edgecombe, joining the land of Marmaduke Norfleet and John Royal.James Edmondson was surveyor’s helper. (D.B. 8, p. 35).

9 March 1761: Joseph Edmondson and wife Marrianah deeded to William Hargrave of Hanover Co. 317 acres, which had been a grant to Joseph Edmondson dated 29 June 1760. (D.B. 7, p. 225).

A grant to John Edmondson was surveyed as 280 acres adjoining Marmaduke Norfleet and John Royal. James Edmonson was a chain carrier. R. in Halifax Court, March 1762. (D.B. 8, p. 35).

Thomas Edmondson was deeded 200 ac. by John Eelbeck, 25 May 1763, between the two Quankey Creeks and adjacent to John Eelbeck. Witnessed by David Crawley and Richard Thompson. (D.B. 8, p. 376).

8 Dec. 1764: Joseph Edmondson was an adjacent landowner of Stephen Hargrave, ‘taylor’, of Halifax Co. (D.B. 9, p. 203).

1.1.1.1.1. James Harris, m. (1) Temperance Williams: Martha Joyner witnessed the will of Temperance Williams, wife of James. 1783: Halifax NC. Will of Temperance Harris names daus: Pharaby Harris, Mary Harris, Sally Harris, Elizabeth Harris; son James Harris; son-in-law Norfleet Harriss (step-son). Witnesses: Elisha Dixon, Martha Joyner. Pheraby Harris.

1. …
1.1. Elisha Williams. 13 Aug. 1751: LWT, probated Feb. 1755 in Edgecombe, now Halifax; names brothers: Solomon Williams, George Williams, Daniel Williams, Joshua Williams, John Williams. Nephew: Richard Williams (son of John Williams) Sisters: Mary Carr, Elizabeth Daughtry. Executor: Joshua Williams. Witnesses: James Smith, Drew Smith, George Bell.
1.2. Joshua Williams, inherited land on Cypress Swamp from his brother, Elisha
1.2.1. Temperance Williams, m. James Harris.
1.2.2. Elisha Williams. 10 Nov. 1769: Wm. Richardson of Johnson Co. to Ely (Elias) Harris of Halifax Co., 133 pounds VA money, 155 acres which was part of land Joseph Richardson purchased from John Drew, joining John Blunt. Wm Richardson. Witnesses: Elisha Williams, John Young, James Harriss.
27 Jan. 1770: Isham Webb of Halifax Co. to John Young and James Harris of same. 280 pounds proc money. 6 negroes: Sisane, Ezekiah, Abram, Alice, Hannah, Jack. Isam Webb. Witness: Elisha Williams, Marmaduke Young. 24 Feb. 1772: John Whitney of Halifax Co to James Harris of same. 100 pounds proc. money. 75 acres “lying in Scotland Neck,” joining Pierce, John Drew. Sig: John Whitney. Wit: Elisha Williams, Thomas Hodges. May Ct. 1772.
1.2.3. Martha Williams, m. John Joyner. William Jarvis, Will R. Feb. Ct. 1785; mention is made of Nancy Hicks, in Maryland, and residue estate to da. Lucy Williams, and son-in-law John Joyner, son of Martha Joyner. Wit: Alexander Comb, Henry Sherrod, William Boykin, John Dawson, Sr. Extrs: Jeremiah Nelms, Thomas Boykin and Elisha Williams.

Nov. Ct. 1784: Ordered that James Smith, Jery Nelms, Elisha Williams and Thomas Blount Whitmell or any Two of them Sette & divide the Estate of Thomas Edwards dec’d., & report &c.

13 Feb. 1788: James Smith of Halifax Co. to Thomas Blount Whitmill and Jacob Barrow. 50 pounds proclamation money. 100 acres on south side of Roanoke River, joining Drew Smith, Arthur Smith, Elisha Williams. Sig: James Smith. Wit: Marmaduke Norfleet, Elisha Williams.

24 Mar. 1788: Philip Alston and his wife Temperance of Moore Co. to Elisha Williams of Halifax Co., 2721 pounds specie. 567 acres, joining Roanoke River, Arther Smith, David Smith, John Bell. Sigs: Philip Alston, Temperance Alston. Wit: Lawrence Williams, Jacob B. Brazill.

13 Aug. 1788: Elisha Williams of Halifax Co. to Phillip Alston of Moore Co. 2800 pounds specie. 570 acres, joining Drew Smith, Widdow Bell, Cypress Swamp, Arthur Smith, Gray, Bryant, Brewer. Sig: Elisha Williams. Wit: John Carrell, James Alston, Joab Cotton.

20 Dec. 1791: To Thomas Blount Whitmill, 290 ac. on south side of Roanoke River, joining Brunson, Robert Ruffin Smith, Elisha Williams. Alex. Martin.

10 Feb. 1796: Thomas B. Whitmill of Halifax Co. to Thomas Barrow of same. 10 Feb 1796. 900 pounds. 145 acres on south side of Roanoke River known as Whitmill Island, joining Whitmill, Asahel Brunson, Robert R. Smith, Elisha Williams. Sig: Thos. B. Whitmall. Wit: Marcus Bishop, Drew Smith.

1.2. John Harris, in the context of Burt:

1. Richard Burt, d. bef. 1745, m. Elizabeth Hansford.
1.1. John Burt, d. bef. 1752, m. Sarah (Marshall?), d. bef. 1784, whose second husband, William Pass, is shown as guardian pf ‘Burt’s Orphans’. A John Marshall (probably her br.) is named with her in a suit by her son, John Burt. William Pass is named with John Marshall, Jr. in several estate appraisals in IoW, including the estate of James Marshall, dated 1774, which states that Sarah is no longer a resident of the county.
1.1.1. John Burt, d. 1774. Charles Darden of Pitt. Co., NC to Jno. Lawrence of IOW, £5 for 40 ac. being the land left me by my father Jacob Darden in the pocosson … adj. John Lawrence, John Burt, William Burt, Jethro Gale. Wit: John Hay, Josiah Jordan. Receipt witnessed by John Hay, Josiah Jordan, John Lawrence Jr. (Unrecorded Deeds from IOW Co., 1770-1797, Lyndon H. Hart). 1 March 1769: Godfrey Powell of Newport Par. to Thomas Powell of the same … 150 ac. adj. Moses Eley, the Indian Swamp, William Bullock, John Marshall, and John Burt (being all of the land of Godfrey Powell). Wit: Jethro Gale, Martha Tomlin, John Marshall, and James Hall. Rec: 7 Sept. 1769. Godfrey Powell brought suit against his mother and John Marshall, who appears to be his mother’s uncle. (ibid. p. 305). The said Martha Tomlin was the wife of John Tomlin Sr., whose Will, rec. 6 Feb 1752, names sons, John, Joseph, and James; wife Martha; witnesses Daniel Herring and Daniel’s cousin, John Harris, and Martha Tomlins. John Harris appraised the estate of John Tomlin Jr., rec. 1 Feb. 1759. John Tomlin Sr. was the son of Matthew Tomlin Jr., br. of Mary (Tomlin) Turner, wife of Edward Harris Sr.
1.1.1.1. John Burt. John Burt, eldest son and heir of John Burt, dec’d., of Newport Parish in Isle of Wight to Frederick George of the upper parish of Nansemond County … 125 acres in Newport Parish (being part of a tract of land of 500 acres which Anthony Holliday, the Elder, was seized of and which he willed to Anthony Covington Holliday and Joseph Holliday and the land was sold to John Coggan who then sold it to the late John Burt, dec’d. and it descended to the present John Burt, adjoining John Nevil, Beaverdam Branch, West, Jacob Dardon, and the Western Branch of Nansemond River. Wit: Josiah Cowling, Peter Green, and Robert Smelley, John Burt. Rec: 7 Apr. 1774.
1.1.2. William Burt Sr.
1.1.2.1. Mary Burt, m. John Tooke. (See footnote 2).
1.1.2.2. William Burt. By 1790 he was listed in Warren Co., NC. Warren County List of Taxables, 1781-1801; 1790: (taken by William Alston) William Burt 1000 ac. William Burt for Alsey Harris’ orphans 228 ac. William Burt was appointed guardian of Amos Harris’ son, Alsa Harris. ‘I find the James Arrington who administered Amos Harris’ estate, and the William Burt who was appointed guardian of Amos’ son Alsa Harris, showing up in a 1791 deed to Catherine Marshall Harris, widow of Amos Harris’ brother Joel, in which a Sikes of Halifax County sells to Caty Harris of Warren 40 acres adjoining Green’s Branch, Samuel Davis, the county line, Ann Harris, Elisha Harrison, Joel Harris’ line, and the Gum Branch, with James Arrington and William Burt witnessing. William Burt was also guardian of Joel’s son Henry, and Burt’s sister Elizabeth married Stephen Marshall, a brother to Catherine Marshall Harris’. (William Lindsey).

Halifax. Co. D.B. 17, p. 994: David Moore of Halifax Co. to Thomas Gibbs of Warren Co. 25 June 1792. 161 acs. which was part of land sold by Goodorum Davis attorney for Dolphin Davis, joining James Arrington, Davis, Ballard (William Burt’s probable br.-in-law), David Moore. Wit: S. Davis, William Burt. Aug. Ct. 1792. 24 Oct. 1796: Devereux Ballard of Halifax Co. to Edmond Jones. 383 ac. where sd Ballard now lives, joining Ransom’s Bridge, Great Fishing Creek, Enoch Davis; also 30 ac. now in possession of William and Enoch Davis. Devereux Ballard. Wit: David Moore, William Burt. Aug Ct. 1797. (D.B. 18, P. 230). 11 June 1794: Caty Gibbs admin. of Thomas Gibbs dec’d of Halifax Co. to William Burt of Warren Co. 40 acres in Halifax and Warren Counties, joining Green’s Branch, Jones, the county line, Amos Harris, Elisha Harrison. Caty Gibbs. Wit: Edmd. Jones, Lawrence Gibbons Jr. Aug. Ct. 1797 (ibid., p. 232). 10 June 1803: Willis Arrington of Halifax Co. to Edmund Jones of same. 10 June 1803. 230 acres which David Moore conveyed to James Arrington Sr. and from him to Willis Arrington, in Halifax and Warren counties where sd Arrington now lives, joining Thomas Gibbs’ orphan, Edmund Jones, Great Fishing Creek, Green’s Branch. Wit: William Burt Jr., Luke Matthews. R. 1 July 1803. (D.B. 19, p. 190). 11 May 1812: Edmund Jones of Halifax Co. to Prissila Hilliard of Northampton Co. 506 ac. in Halifax and Warren counties on the north side of Great Fishing Creek which had been purchased from Willis Arrington, joining Greens Branch, Arrington, the old road, Gibbs, the old race paths, Orren Harriss’ former line; also 398 acres in Halifax Co. where sd Jones now lives and which sd Jones purchased from Devereux Ballard, joining the old road, sd Jones, the Giddy tract, Great Fishing, Ransoms Bridge, Enoch Davis; also his mill and 2 acres on Great Fishing Creek conveyed to him by Enoch Davis. Wit: Edmund Peeble, Thomas Peeble, John Barnes. May Ct. 1812. (D.B. 22, p. 186). Warren Co. B. 15, p. 208: Will of James Aarrington, 21 Dec. 1807. Names wife Ann; daus.: Elizabeth Marshall, Martha Smith, (and her da. Mary Anne Blount, da. Of Joseph Blount dec’d) Mary Southall, and Nancy Culpepper; Sons: Willis, James, and Henry. Wit: William Burt.

Will of Philip Alston, rec. July Ct. 1784, wit. by Stephen and Samuel Alston. Will of Joseph Harris, rec. Jan. Ct. 1785, wit. by Stephen and Samuel Alston. Philip Alston m. Winifred Whitmel, da. of Col. Thomas Whitmel and Elizabeth Blount. Warren Co. ct. minutes, 2 Jan. 1785, Stephen and Samuel Marshall pr. the will of Joseph Harris, and Joel and Amos Harris were granted letters testamentary to admr. Alsa Harris was theeldest son of Amos Harris. William Burt was made Alsa’s guardian when Amos died, giving bond with Stephen Marshall.

(As follows, James Harris. b. 2 Nov. 1775, Halifax Co., d. 5 Oct. 1828, Halifax Co., m. Winifred Whitmell Williams, da. of Col. Joseph John Williams, son of Samuel Williams* and Elizabeth Alston, da. of Philip Alston and Winifred Whitmel, b. 5 Dec. 1729).

Thus:

I. Thomas Harris, d. 1688.
1.1. John Harris, m. Mary Herring (probably), da. of Anthony Herring and Rebecca West.
1.1.1. Martha Harris, m. John Batten, son of Daniel Batten, Jr. and Sarah Best. On 2 May 1750, John Batten sold to Thomas Bracey and wife, Hester, 100 ac. (being part of a patent to Thomas Harris on 27 April 1686, and inherited by John Batten. (IOW D.B 8, p. 342). On 12 Sept. 1754, John Batten and wife, Martha, sold to George Hall 20 ac. (being part of the patent granted Thomas Harris on 27 April 1686 for 240 acres, and by Edward Harris, sold to said Batten on 10 June 1746), adjoining Daniel Batten, the Blackwater Road and Thomas Bracey. (IOW D.B 9, p. 279).
1.1.2. John Harris, probably m. a da. of John Burt (and Sarah Marshall), thus a cousin of William Burt Jr., who was appointed guardian of Amos Harris’ son, Alsa Harris.
1.1.3. Joseph Harris.
1.1.3.1. Amos Harris.
1.1.3.1.1. Alsa Harris.
1.1.3.2. Joel Harris, m. Catherine, da. of David Marshall and Mary Davis.
1.1.4. Thomas Harris, d. 1770.
1.1.5. Moses Harris, m. Sarah, da. of Samuel Despain and Anna Marshall.
1.1.6. John Harris.
1.1.6.1. Orrin Harris. To repeat: 11 May 1812: Edmund Jones of Halifax Co. to Prissila Hilliard of Northampton Co. 506 ac. in Halifax and Warren counties on the north side of Great Fishing Creek which had been purchased from Willis Arrington, joining Greens Branch, Arrington, the old road, Gibbs, the old race paths, Orren Harriss’ former line; also 398 acs. in Halifax Co. where sd Jones now lives and which sd Jones purchased from Devereux Ballard, joining the old road, sd Jones, the Giddy tract, Great Fishing, Ransoms Bridge, Enoch Davis; also his mill and 2 ac. on Great Fishing Creek conveyed to him by Enoch Davis. Wit: Edmund Peeble, Thomas Peeble, John Barnes. May Ct. 1812.

These relationships are reflected in the Newport Parish Vestry Book, 1752-1760, p. 231, by order of Vestry dated 17 Oct. 1755, the following lines processioned:
John Marshall and William Bullock.
John Marshall and Godfrey Powell.
William Pass for Burt’s Orphans and Godfrey Powell.
William Bullock and Godfrey Powell.
William Bullock and Elizabeth Darden.
Matthew Jordan and Eliza Darden.
William Burt and William Pass for Burt’s Orphans.
William Burt and John Marshall.
William Pass for Burt’s Orphans and Eliza Darden.
Charles Darden and Orphans of Jacob Pope.
William Burt and Orphans of Jacob Pope.

Processions, 2 March 1760, ibid., p. 272:
John Westry and Robert Johnson. Martha Westray’s Orphans Account was returned into Court by Daniel Herring, Gent, Guardian.
John Tomlin (III.) and Robert Johnson, desc. of John Johnson: Matthew Tomlin of the Lower Parish of Isle of Wight County to John Johnson of the same parish, ‘for a valuable consideration’, a 225 ac. tract ‘commonly called Pigneck’, bounded by ‘Thomas Harris’ Corner Tree’. (Perhaps he who d. 1677). Rob. Johnson’s estate: leg. wife, Martha; da. Rebecca Tomlin. Wit. William Marshall, Matthew Tomlin. R. 6 Jan. 1785.
Arthur Applewhite and Benjamin Westry.
Arthur Applewhite and William Burt.
Arthur Applewhite and Richard Pope.
Arthur Applewhite and William Eley.
William Pass and William Eley.
Edmond Westry and William Eley.
Edmond Westry and William Pass.

To repeat: Adjoining land owners in England of the same generation and of different names were almost invariably br.-in-law or cousins; those of a differnt generation, either uncles or nephews. It could not have been any different in Virginia.

The connection to Lawrence stems from the intermarried families of Council and Lawrence, of Wedmore, Somerset, as given heretofore. William Lawrence, Will prob. 2 June 1757, names son John, bequesting him Currawaugh land bought from Colonel Joseph Bridger; brother-in-law and executor Arthur Applewhite. Witnessed: John Darden, Jesse Watkins, and Joshua Council. On 7 September 1758, the estate of the late William Lawrence was appraised by Daniel Herring, Michael Eley, and Joshua Council. On 28 April 1742, William Lawrence, William Moore, and Jesse Brown appraised the property of John Daughtry.

1.3. Robert Harris.
1.3.1. Francis Harris. Francis Harris. Will R. June 5. 1746, naming wife Julyana (who later m. William Womack), Nathaniel Hicks, and Simon Turner, exs. da. Mary Harris (not of age); br. Semore Harris’s son Simon; sister Patience Cato and her da. Lucresha. Legatee: Simon Harris’ son James; bro. Simon Harris and his son Jacob. Wit. Burrell Brown, George Rives, Nathaniel Hicks. Inv. R. 6 Nov. 1746. Juliana Womack returned. Appr. George Wyche, Henry Cooke, Peter Wyche.
1.3.1. Seymour Harris.
1.3.1.1. Simon Harris.
1.3.1.1.1. James Harris.
1.3.1.1.2. Jacob Harris.
1.3.2. Patience Harris, m. Daniel Cato (son of Burwell), d. 3 March 1794. Daniel Cato’s inventory of the estate of Henry Cooke, deceased – Brunswick Co. W.B 4, p. 457 – the list of persons paying to estate: David Peebles, Ephraim Peebles, Sterling Cato, Daniel Cato. Returned to court 25 Sept. 1775.

Burwell Cato: ‘In the name of God, amen: I, Burwell Cato of Brunswick Co. in Meherrin Parish, being in perfect mind & disposin memory, do make & ordain this my ast Will & Testament, in a manner & form following: Impremis: I give & bequeath unto my son, Daniel Cato, after the death or widowhood of my wife, all my lands … I desire that no part of my estate shall be appraised nor my executors give no security, but to be disposed as I have aforementioned, and I do appoint John Walton & George Walton my Executors of this my last Will & Testiment. Witness my hand this 11th day of February, 1769. Signed Burwell Cato Witness: Angelica Walton, and Elizabeth Sargent.

Norwood/Harris cont.
1.1.2. Elias Harris, d. 1788, Halifax Co., m. Silva ... Abner Harris (son) executor.
1.1.2.1. Abner Harris, moved to Montgomery Co., Tennessee c. 1798 accompanied by his mother and her second husband, Col.John Hargrove. (See heretofore notes on his father’s connections to families of Branch/Edmundsen/Norfleet). He purchased land on Hurricane creek. In 1802, John Duke, Josiah Duke and Abner Harris were adninistrators for John Duke, adminlstrator of the estate of Rlchard Myrick. At July Court, 1803, he was named guardian of the orphans of Richard Blanton, chlldren of his sister, Lucy, Nancy and Sally Blanton. Abner Harris was co-executor with his slster, Francis, of the will of her husband, Joseph McCorkle, which was Proved in 1806. With Sterllng Neblett, he was appointed by the court to examine the account of Isham Trotter against the estate of Robert Trotter, deceased. In 1814 he, Stephen Cocke, and Thomas Smith made $10,000 bond for Sterling Neblett, administrator of the estate of Williarn B. Whitehead. Abner Harris’ will was proved at January Court 1826. Abner’s da. Mary H. Harris married John Duke of Montgomery Co., Tennessee, on 6 July 1818. Samuel Duke, Elva Duke, and John Read executed a deed to John Duke for 250 acres on Hurricane Creek. On 20 Dec. 1828, John Duke of Wayne Co., Tennessee, executed a deed to Arthur Harris of Montgomery Co., witnessed by John Bumpass and Tompkins Bumpass.
1.1.2.2. Hugh Harris.
1.1.2.3. Arthur Harris.
1.1.2.4. Frances Harris.
1.1.2.5. Lucy Harris, m. Richard Blanton, who d. in 1803, in Montgomery Co., br. of William Blanton, the father of Jeremiah Blanton, who m. Sarah Womack, b. 10 Aug. 1782, in Rutherford Co, NC, on 22 Feb. 1799. Jeremiah was the br. of Ruth Hicks.
1.1.2.6. Sally Harris, m. Samuel Pope. Montgomery Co., Tn. W.B. D, p 203, shows Elias F. Pope and Harris Pope making an agreement for the “love and affection” for their parents, Samuel and Sally Pope, 21 July 1823.
1.1.2.7. James Harris. b. 2 Nov. 1775, Halifax Co., d. 5 Oct. 1828, Halifax Co., m. Winifred Whitmell Williams, da. of Col. Joseph John Williams, son of Samuel Williams* and Elizabeth Alston, da. of Philip Alston and Winifred Whitmel, b. 5 Dec. 1729.
1.1.2.6.1. Thomas Whitmell Harris, b. 30 Dec. 1810, m. Martha Helen Hardee Kearney, b. 1817, da. of William Kinchen Kearney, b. 1 Aug. 1785, and Maria Alston b. 25 Dec. 1791, da. of Lt. Col. William Alston, b. 7 Oct. 1747, and Martha Hardee. William Kinchen Kearney was the son of Philip Kearney and Elizabeth Kinchen, da. of William Kinchen, b. 1 June 1696. Thomas Whitmell Harris and Martha had 11 children. They lived near Panacea Springs, Warren Co.
1.1.2.6.1.1. James Norfleet Harris, m. Linda Roach; lived MO, Oregon Co, Thayer.

Samuel Williams, the son of William Williams and Mary Moore of Chowan Co., m. Elizabeth Alston , da. of John Alston . Their issue: William Williams, m.  Elizabeth Whitmell-Blount-Pollock (twice widowed). Solomon Williams, m.  Temperance Boddie (d.1784). Joseph John Williams, m. (2) Elizabeth Alston (1st cousin, da. of Philip Alston and Winifred Whitmell.

After the death of Samuel, Elizabeth remarried  (17 Sept. 1765) Richard Burt.

In the name of God Amen. The twenty-fourth day of October One thousand seven hundred and fifty-three, I, Samuel Williams of the county of Edgecomb …  Item. I give divise and bequeath to son John Williams his heirs and assigns forever the plantation whereon I now live and all the land thereunto belonging and the plantation which I bought of John Burt and all the land thereunto belonging, and also one hundred and fifty acres which I bought of John Egerton.

Footnote 1

If the William Harris who m. Mary Short was a son of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, then he and any brothers had close associations to the land owned by Sergeant John Harris, which at least makes a feasible case for a descent of:

1. William Short.
1.1. William Short, d. bef. 28 March 1676, m. Mary Rookings, da. of William Rookings Sr.
1.1.1. William Short, d. bef. 16 Sept. 1741, m. (1692) Susanna Heath, d. 21 March 1744, da. of William Heath.
1.1.1.1. Mary Short, William Harris.
1.2. Thomas Short, m. Elizabeth …
1.2.1. Robert Short, d. bef. 7 Dec. 1760, m. Amy …
1.2.1.1. William Short, d. 12 Oct. 1769, m. Mary Birch.
1.2.1.1. William Short Jr., d. bef. 27 Nov. 1769, m. Sarah Robinson, d. bef. 30 Oct. 1776. William Short Sr. and William Short Jr. witnessed the Will of William Merritt, recorded in 1788; his da., Mary Merritt, m. (1746) Isaac House; their son, Miles House, m. Sarah Short; their son, Merritt House, m. Mary Short; Merritt House’ sisters, Rebecca House, m. Griffin Short; and Frances House, m. Benjamin Short.
1.2.2. William Short, d. bef. 1737, m. (1694) Elizabeth Griffith.
1.2.2.1. Cornelius Short, d. bef. 1 Jan. 1764, m. (1728) Elizabeth Griffith Tynes.
1.2.2.1.1. William Short (4 Aug. 1730-10 Feb. 1805) m. Winifred Echols (2 Dec. 1733-10 July 1800).
1.2.2.1.2. Cornelius Short (4 Aug. 1732-1762) m. (1730) … Echols.
1.2.2.1.3. John Short (1736-1796) m. (17990 Elizabeth Echols (1736-1796), a da. of Abraham Echols (Will R. 3 Oct. 1749). and Sarah Hubbard

There is no known association between Abraham Echolls and the Echolls family associated with Thomas Harris, d. 1677.

The William Harris who m. Mary Short could have been the son of John Harris, bapt. 1640, in Nunney, br. of Thomas, bapt. 1636; or indeed, a descendant of John Harris and Agnes Coomer. Whatever the case, it seems reasonable to suggest that Thomas Harris, d. 1688, was of the family of Sergeant John Harris.

 

Footnote 2.

John Tooke was of the Tooke family of Barwick, Somerset, 27 mls fr. Wedmore, descended from William Tucke, who m. Christian Holman, 18 July 1571, and associated with Thomas Harris, d. 1672. In terms of the English kinship system, it is invariably ‘the wider’ associations of any one person that provides their antescedance: John Tooke was the grandson of John Tooke (Will probated 23 June 1752; witnessed by James Parham, and Elizabeth Skelton. 24 Jan. 1758: Appraisal of estate of Matthew Parham; estate sold by James Parham of Northampton Co. N.C. being person who obtained administration on estate. Items sold to Batt Peterson, John Peterson, James Parham, Joseph Wright, Thomas Jefferson, Burwell Brown, James Luncy, Charles Hicks, William Collier, Robert Barlow, John Swett, Wm. Richardson, value 33 pounds. Brunswick W.B 3, p. 23. Marriages of Granville Co. N.C: Thomas Parham & Agnes Hicks 19 Apr. 1785.

(1. William Tucke, m. Christian Holman, 18 July 1571, at Barwick, St Mary Magdalene, 27 mls fr. Wedmore.
1.1. Thomas Tucke, m. Mary Collins, 26 Jan. 1604, Barwick.
1.1.1. James Tooke. December 1634, William Lacey leased James Tooke 500 acres on the east side of Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease. (I suggest that this Robert Harris was the father of Edward Harris, d. 1677).
1.1.1.1. William Tooke. On 29 November 1672, he testified that his age was 46. He sold 900 acres of land in IOW Co. on 3 Jan. 1661; land patented by James Tooke, 11 Nov. 1640.
1.1.1.1.1. John Tooke of Surry Co., left a Will proved 15 Feb. 1720. He appointed John Parson and William Ezell executors and John Parson, Samuel Sebrell, and James Pyland as trustees. A codicil named William Ezell as guardian of his son, John.
1.1.1.1.1.1. John Tooke: 4 July 1745, Brunswick Co. Indenture: Between John Tooke of Brunswick, Black Smith, and Absalom Atkinson of IOW, school master, 50 pounds, beginning at a Live Oak on the north side of Fountain’s Creek in the Co. of Brunswick. (B. 3, p. 39).

George Rives of Northampton Co., NC., for £50 paid by James Parham of Brunswick Co., St. Andrews Parish, 50a, being a tract of land granted to the sd. George Rives by a deed of gift dated 29 Nov. 1746 by Thomas Rives his father, dated 5 May 1748. Signed George Rives. Witnesses: Absalom Atkinson,John Atkinson, William Ezell, Junr. Court 5 May 1748. Deed acknowledged by George Rives and Mary the wife of the said George appeared and relinquished her right of Dower. (D.B 3, p. 411).

On 9 May 1738, Thomas Rives purchased from John and Batte Peterson, ‘of Prince George county’, 100 ac. in Brunswick which was described as part of a larger tract of 385 acres taken up by John Peterson on 20 Feb. 1719, being defined as up the Fork next to Rives little old field to Mathew Parham’s line and along Parham’s line to Jeremiah Brown’s land. Witnesses: Burwell Brown, Thomas Rives, Jr., and Robert Douglas. One half of this land he deeded on 29 Nov. 1746, to his son George Rives. The second half was deeded by him to his son, Harmon, in 1757, witnessed by Tho. Person, Wm. Parham, Nathaniel Perry, and Nathaniel Hicks.

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DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD MERIWETHER (MERYWEDDER)

It is simple enough to show the kinship connections between the Bathursts and Meriwethers of Virginia:

1. Richard Merywedder, m. … Wright.

1.1. John Merywedder.

1.2. Roger Merywedder: Roger Merywedder v. John Nykkyne: answer and replication. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 4/38/3. Post 1 Jan. 1501).

1.2.1. John Meriwether: Millar v Meriwether. Plaintiffs: Thomas Millar. Defendants: John Meriwether. Subject of decree: Moiety of two messuages and 40 acres of land in Sibertswold, Kent. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 78/2/35. 30 May 1543). Merywedder v Merywedder. Plaintiffs: John, grandson of Richard Merywedder. Defendants: John Merywedder the elder, his uncle. Subject: Messuage and land in Barfreston and Shepherdswell formerly of Henry Wright, father-in-law of the said Richard. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 1/1038/28-30. 1538-1544). Edward Hasted, The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent, vol. 4, p. 4., 1799: ‘Shepherdswell: Butter-Street Farm, with the mansion called the Place-house, and the lands belonging to it, being the principal farm in this parish, was formerly part of the demesnes of the manor of Upton-court above-mentioned, and was held of the abbot of St. Augustine, and passed in like sort as the manor itself into the family of Boys, from which it was in queen Elizabeth’s time alienated to Mr. John Merriweather, who afterwards resided here; by one of whose descendants the present mansion was built. In which family, who bore for their arms, Or, three martlets, sable, on a chief, azure, a sun, or, this estate continued, till at length it was carried by Anne, sole sister and heir of Mr. Richard Merriweather, who died unmarried in 1720. The Parkers resided here in king James the 1st.’s reign, as tenants to Sir John Boys, who held it of the archbishop; which family of Parker bore for their arms, Ermine, Six escallops, gules, three, two, and one; confirmed to John Parker, gent. of Sybertswold, by Robert Cooke, clarencieux, in 1588, anno 30 Elizabeth.

1.2.1.1. Edward Meriwether: Myller v Merywether. Plaintiffs: Thomas Myller, husbandman. Defendants: Edward, son of John Merywether, deceased. Subject: Lands in Shepherdswell late of Thomas Myller of Nonington, deceased, grandfather of complainant. Kent. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 1/1369/95-96. 1553-1555).

1.2.1.1.1. Richard Merywether: Plaintiff: Wm Knight exor of … Harryson farm of rect. Orgarswick; defendant: Rich(ard) Merywether (of) Shepherdswell, exor of Edw. M(erywether). (Canterbury Cathedral Archives, ref. DCb/J/J/1/86. 16 Sept. 1595).

1.2.1.1.1.1. John Merewether: Merewether, John, of “Shepersdwolde,” g., and Mary Fillmer, s. p., V. Giles Golding of Bethersden, g., bonds. Feb. 21, 1590. She was the sister of Sir Edward Filmer, who m. (1585) Elizabeth Argall, da. of Richard Argall and Mary Scott, da. of Sir Reginald Scott, of Scott’s Hall, in Kent, br. of Sir Thomas Scott, as follows.

(1. Randolph Bathurst, m. Katherine Argall, da. of Richard Argall and Mary Scott. The Will of Henry Bathurst of Horton Kirby, co. Kent, gent., dated 1 March 1619, mentions Catherine, wife of brother Randolph Bathurst Esq. 1.1. Lancelot Bathurst, Alderman of St Mary Botolph, London, d. 26 Sept. 1596 (Drake 84). 1.1.1.  George Bathurst, 1587-1650, lived at Hothorpe in Northamptonshire, as dower of his wife Elizabeth Villiers (m. 1610), da. of Edward Villiers. This large royalist family suffered greatly in the Civil War, with six of their sons being killed. (Andrew Pyle (editor), Dictionary of Seventeenth Century British Philosophers (2000), pp. 74–75).  1.1.1.1. Sir Edward Bathurst, born 1608/9. 1.1.1.1.1. Lancelot Bathurst, Esq. (of Virginia) :- ‘Articles of agreement for inclosure between the freeholders of Hothorpe co. Northants (the manor of George Bathurst and his descendants), viz. (1) Launcelott Bathurst Esq. (6) Edward Marston and Mary Marston his mother'(East Sussex Record Office (ESRO), ref. Sus/A/YO606, 14 May 1666). The same tenements were associated with Edward Meriwether: ‘Edward Meriwether, plaintiff, Edward Marston, gent. and Mary, his wife, Thomas Burton and Elizabeth, his wife and Robert Wickenden otherwise Wiggenden, deforciants’ (ESRO, ref. Sus/A/U908/T35/8, 1657). Similar articles of agreement concerned Lancelot’s brothers, Henry (Northamptonshire Record Office (NRO), ref. YO 161, 20 March 1649; and Ralph, jointly with Lancelot (NRO, ref. YO 174, 1 April 1662).  1.1.1.1.1.1.  Mary Bathurst, m. Francis Meriwether, whose estate was admin. by Bartholomew Owen).

1.2.1.1.1.1.1. John Meriweather: Meriweather, John, of Shepherdswell, g., and Alice Crayford of Great Mongeham, v. At Great Mongeham. Jan. 7, 1613.

1.2.1.1.1.2. Edward Meriwether: Merriwether, Edward, of Shepherdswell, g., and Ursula Shrubsall of Faversham, v. Anthony Deale of Faversham, g., bonds. Oct. 1, 1593.

1.2.1.1.1.2.1. Edward Meriwether Gent, b. 1598, bur. 18 May 1647, Barfrestone, Kent (Tyler Index to Parish Registers).

1.2.1.1.1.2.1.1. Edward Meriwether; tenant of his kinsman, Lawrence Bathurst, in Hothorpe co. Northants.

1.2.1.1.1.2.1.2. Nicholas Meriwether of Virginia, I suggest.

1.2.1.1.1.2.1.2.1. Francis Meriwether, m. his kinswoman, Mary Bathurst.

1.2.1.1.2. William Merywether.

1.2.1.1.2.1. William Merywether: Merywether, William, of Sibertiswell, g., and Elizabeth Knatchbull of Mersham, v. At St. Paul’s, Cant. John Merywether of Sibertiswell, g., bonds. May 28, 1605: ‘Here lyeth The Body of Richard Knatchbull of Mersham Esq. who died ye 20th of January 1590 being of the age of 36 Yeares. He was the eldest sonne of that Richard Knatchbull who lieth at the Entrance of this Chancell, who had 2 Wives; the first was Joanne Sheafe, by whome he had two sonnes, this Richard, and John; and fowre daughters, Alice, Anne, Elizabeth and Katherine. The Second was Susan Greene, by whome he had Fowre Sonnes, Norton, Thomas, John and George; and two daughters, Ursula, and Marie. The Issue Male by Joanne Sheafe were thus matched. This Richard married Ann Scott, the second daughter of Sr. Thomas Scott, Knt. by whome he had Thomas Knatchbull; and, John married Eisabeth Scott, the fowrthe daughter of the sayd Sr. Thomas Scott, who died without Issue.

1.2.1.1.2.1.1. John Merewether, Esq., m. Dorothy Petit, dau. and coheir of William Petit of Shalmesford Bridge, in  Chartham, co. Kent, relict of William Master; m. 3. … Parker. Within Chartham is the manor of Densted about the 3d year of king Edward VI. alienated his interest in it to Richard Argall, whose descendant John Argall sold it, about the beginning of king James I.’s reign, to Sir John Collimore, of Canterbury, who in 1620, conveyed it to trustees, to be sold for the payment of his debts; and they conveyed it to Thomas Steed, esq. who in the reign of king Charles I. passed it away to Sir Thomas Swan, of Southfleet. The manor of Shalmsford Bridge was another manor of Chartham. William de Shalmelesford, who possessed it in the beginning of the reign of Edward II. leaving an only daughter and heir Anne, she carried it in marriage to John Petit, who resided here, and died before the 20th year of the next reign of king Edward III. bearing for his arms, Gules, a chevron, between three leopards faces, argent. In his descendants, who resided at Shalmesford, this manor continued down to Thomas Petit, esq. of Canterbury, who died possessed of it in 1625, leaving his three sisters his coheirs, who became entitled to this manor in undivided thirds. They were married afterwards, Catherine to Michael Belke; Elizabeth to Giles Master, of Woodchurch; and Dorothy first to William Master, secondly to John Merryweather, and thirdly to Parker, of Northfleet.

1.2.1.1.2.1.1.1. William Merewether: Merewether v Parker. Plaintiffs: William Merewether. Defendants: Dorothy Parker. Subject: property in Sibertswold, Kent. Nat. Arch., ref. C 3/453/127. 1642-1660.

The Bathursts had strong association with Oriel College. A reason suggested by by Jacob Price (Perry of London, a Family and a Firm on the Seaborne Frontier, p. 19, 2010) for the association of Micajah Perry and his partner, Thomas Lane, is a common acquantance with Dr. Richard Owen of Oriel College, who married Thomas Lane and Mary Puckle in St. Swithins, in 1679. Thomas Lane’s uncle was a Fellow of Oriel College, as was Cadwaladr Owen, father of Dr. Richard Owen. Micajah Perry m. Anne Owen, da. of Dr. Richard Owen.

These Owens were a common thread in the weave of these families. Ipso facto, Bartholomew Owen was also a member of this family of Owen, perhaps a nephew of Dr. Richard Owen.

OWEN OF RHIWSAESON.

Quarterly 1 and 4 gules, a lion rampant reguardant or.

1. Richard ap Morris Owen, of Rhiwsaeson, Sheriff in 1579, who married Elen Lloyd, da. of John Vaughan ab Rhydderch of Glanlery.
1.1. Morris Owen Esq., of Rhiwsaeson, fl. 1612 (Dwnn), m. (1) Lucy BLayney, da. of David Lloyd Blayney, c. 1515-1595, and Elizabeth Gwyn, d. 1590; da. of Lewis Gwyn, Constable of Bishop’s Castle. (2) Mary verch Howell Vaughn ap Howell ap Griffith Jenkyns, relict of Hugh ap Evan, Esq., descended in the 12th generation from Guiddno Garamir, lord of Merioneth, and Ystradwen verch Cadell Deyrnllyg, King of Powis (ibid.). She was the mother of Sir Lewis ap Hugh, vicar of Llanbrynmair, in the township of Rhiwsaeson, and John ap Hugh, who m. Catherine verch Sir Richard Herbert, of Montgomery, by his last wife, (ibid.), br. of Matthew Herbert of Dolguog, as follows. ‘Morris Owen of Rhiwsaeson, was on the Grand Jury for the first time in 39 Elizabeth (1597), and on the roll of magistrates in 41 Elizabeth (1599), and subsequent years, but his name does not appear after 1613. He was Sheriff in 1612. He m. Lucy, da. of David Lloyd Blaeney of Gregynog, by whom he had six sons Athelstan (who succeeded him), Randle (of Gellidywyll), David, Richard, M.A., Rowland, Cadwalader, Lewis, and Henry; also a da., Elen, who married William Pryce ap John Pryce of Peniarth.
1.1.1. Athelstan Owen, deputy sheriff of Mont., noted here: Owen v Herbert. Plaintiffs: Morris Owen. Defendants: Margaret Herbert and Athelstan Owen. Subject: messuages and lands in the parish of Llanbrynmair, Montgomeryshire. (Nat. Arch. ref. 2/JasI/O2/19. 1603-1612.
1.1.2. Randle Owen, second son of Maurice Owen of Rhiwsaeson, m. Elen Wyn, da. and heiress of Humphrey Wynne of Gellidywyll, son of Thomas ap Humphrey ap David ap Howell ap Owen ap Griffith, of Rhiwsaeson.
1.1.2.1. Andrew Owen, of Gellidywyll (on Grand Jury 1661, 1663, and 1668), who m. Ursula, da. of Evan Glyn of Glyn Clywedog, in the parish of Llanidloes (marriage settlement dated 8th July 1652).
1.1.2.1.1. Thomas Owen, bapt. 7th April 1665.
1.1.4. David Owen.
1.1.2. Richard Owen, M.A.
1.1.3. Rowland Owen. Matthew Herbert,* lessee of Penrhos Mill, bought a suit in the Exchequer against Rowland Owen and Hugh ap Ieuan Lloyd, being freeholders within the lordship of Cyfeiliog, owners of Melin Y Garth (Garth Mill) and Y Felin Newydd (New Mill on the Gwydol River), and who had withdrawn their own suit of mill called Penrhos Mill.
1.1.4. Cadwaladr Owen, 1562-1617, proposed by the Herberts as vicar of Llanbrynmair, matriculated at Jesus College, Oxford, Nov. 24, 1581; graduated B.A. in 1583, M.A. in 1588, and B.D. in 1603; and was elected fellow of Oriel College in 1585; m. Blanch, the da. of John Roberts, Esq., younger brother to Lewis Anwyl Esq., of Park, in com. Merion, father of William Lewis Anwyl, as follows.
1.1.4.1. Dr. Richard Owen.
1.1.5. Lewis Owen.
1.1.6. Henry Owen, Will dated 18th November 1641 (from St. Asaph Registry); names Sister-in-law, Mrs. Elizabeth Owen, Rhiwsaeson ; nephew, Richard Owen, of Rhiwsaeson; dear and wellbeloved mother, Luce Owen, widow; brother, Randle Owen; his eldest son, Morris; his brother Rowland he forgives all reckonings, and gives three pounds; cozen Elizabeth Blayney, Widow, ten shillings; cozen John ap Richard Watkin. Brother Cadwalader and Richard John, his sureties.
1.2. Edward Owen, m. Ellin Wynne, da. of Morris ap Robert Wynne, Esq., of Glynn, and Agnes, da. of Robert ap Richard, of Llecheiddior, in Carnarvonshire. Ellin Wynne was the sister of William Wynne Esq., of Glynn, who m. Katherine, da. of William Lewis Anwyl, Esq. of Park, in Merionethshire, and sister of Lewis Anwyl, Esq., whose da., Katherine, married to William Owen, esq. of Porkington, son of the royalist commander, Sir John Owen.

HERBERT

1. Sir Richard Herbert of Colebrooke, d. 27 July 1469, m. Margaret, da. of Sir Thomas ap Griffith ap Nicholas of Carmarthena, and Elizabeth, da. of Sir John Griffith.
1.1. Sir Richard Herbert of Ewyas, d. 1510 (an illigitimate son of that Yorkist Earl of Pembroke who had been killed at Banbury fighting against Warwick the Kingmaker), m. Margaret Cradock, da. of Sir Matthew Cradock, of Swansea.
1.1.1. Sir William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke, d. 1569, m. 1. Anne Parr, d. 1551, da. of Sir Thomas Parr, of Kendal.
1.1.2. George Herbert, 1494-1570, of Swansea, , 1st s. of Richard Herbert of Ewyas, Herefs. by Margaret, da. and h. of Sir Matthew Cradock of Swansea; bro. of William Herbert, m. (1) by 1531, Elizabeth, da. of Sir Thomas Berkeley of The Vyne, Hants, 3s. inc. William Herbert, 3da.; (2) Grace Bewring, wid. of Geoffrey Newton. suc. fa. 1510. Kntd. 12 Mar./18 Apr. 1543. George Herbert’s career was patterned on, although it did not rival, that of his younger brother William, 1st Earl of Pembroke. Until about 1540 he made his way in South Wales under the aegis of his kinsmen the 5th Lord Bergavenny and the 1st and 2nd Earls of Worcester, but his position was transformed by his brother’s ascendancy at court and the King’s marriage to William Herbert’s sister-in-law Catherine Parr. Established at Swansea, where he built his mansion Plas Newydd. Following the disclosure that he owed the crown £1,200, almost certainly money collected by his son Matthew as receiver for South Wales and not delivered to the augmentations before Matthew’s death, his goods were distrained but within two years his heir and grandson William was able to enter upon an estate free from debt. Grace Bewring survived him but in later legal proceedings the heir alleged that Herbert had never lawfully been married to her. (The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1509-1558, ed. S.T. Bindoff, 1982).
1.1.2.1. Matthew Herbert.
1.1.2.1.1. Sir John Herbert, b. c. 1533, 2nd s. of Matthew Herbert (d. bet. 1549 and 1554) of Swansea, and Mary, da. of Sir Thomas Gamage of Coity, Glam.; bro. of William and Nicholas. educ. Christ Church, Oxf. 1554, BA 1558, MA 1561, BCL 1565; Doctors’ Commons 1573; DCL 1587; G. Inn 1592. m. by 1579, Margaret (d. 1625), da. of Watkin ap Watkin Morgan of Penclawdd, Llantilio Pertholey, Mon., 1 da. kntd. bef. 2 Oct. 1601; suc. bro. 1609. d. bet. 5/7 July 1617. sig. J[ohn] Herbert. Herbert was descended from Richard Herbert of Ewyas, whose son, George, established the family’s fortunes around Swansea during the early sixteenth century. His father apparently died young, leaving Herbert’s elder brother, William, to administer the Glamorganshire estates. Herbert himself was born around 1533, as his funeral monument makes plain (rather than in the mid-1550s as an edition of Glamorgan pedigrees suggests); he attended Christ Church, Oxford from 1554.
1.1.2.1.2. Sir William Herbert, d. 1610.
1.1.2.1.3. Anne Herbert, m. (her kinsman) Matthew Herbert, of Coldbrook.
1.2.1.3.1. William Herbert, Esq., of colebrook.
1.2.1.3.1.1. *Matthew Herbert, of Coldbrook; named as son in Chancery proceedings, Eliz., H.h.8, no. 45).
1.2. Sir Richard Herbert of Colebrooke and Tefaldwyn, Montgomery, d. 1539, m. 2. Anne, da. of David ap Ifan ap Llywelyn Fychan of Trefeglwy.
1.2.1. Edward Herbert, of Montgomery Castle, m. Elizabeth Pryce, da. of Matthew Pryce, of Newton. He was an agent to the 1st Earl of Worcester and steward of the crown lordships of Montgomery, Kerry and Kedewain, Arwystli and Cyfeiliog, the chief pillar of the Tudor settlement of PowiS.
1.2.1.1. Matthew Herbert of Dolguog, b. c. 1563, 2nd s. of Edward Herbert, and bro. of Richard Herbert. educ. I. Temple 1582; Lincoln, Oxf. 1589. m. Margaret, da. of Charles Foxe of Bromfield, Salop, 2s. 2da. J.p. Mont. from c.1594, Merion. from c. 1596; sheriff, Merion. 1598-9, 1609-10. Although his elder brother, Richard Herbert, was the principal heir, Matthew was well provided for on his father’s death in 1593. He inherited lands in Cyfeiliog and Machynlleth in Montgomeryshire, and his father’s mill, toll and fishing interests in the Dovey in Merioneth. He also took over the tithes of Llanegryn rectory in that county. In 1599 Herbert was described as a man of ‘great wealth and kinship’ in Merioneth.
1.2.1.1.1. Elizabeth Herbert, m. Athelstan Owen, of Rhiwsaeson, who first appears on the roll of magistrates in 1622, and the last time in 1638. As given heretofore, her third cousin married Margaret, da. of Watkin ap Watkin Morgan of Penclawdd, Llantilio Pertholey, Mon.
1.2.1.2. Richard Herbert.
1.2.1.2.1. John Herbert.
1.2.1.2.1.1. Edward Herbert.
1.2.1.2.1.1.1. Elizabeth Herbert, m. William Lewis Anwyl of Park, Sherif of Merionethshire.

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LANCELOT BATHURST OF VIRGINIA REVEALED

 

547297_3c920580

HOTHORPE HILLS

As the Norse Sagas of old, a certain caution must be attached to the writings of bygone genealogists, who tended to copy the works of each other. One of their genre, Mr. Collins, sent letters to the gentry, kindly asking them to supply details of their ancestry. This less than secure practice followed on one in which heralds were bribed to invent or massage pedigrees so as to make them more grandiose. The doyen of genealogical malpractice was Mr. Burke, who supplied more ancestors stemming from ‘companions of the Conqueror’ than actually fought at Hastings. The uncertainties of genealogical enquiry can not be made to be more accurate by couching pedigrees in a pseudo- academic format, that is, by referencing them with dubious ‘authorities’. Not all that was once written is false, and it is important ‘not to throw the baby out with the bathwater’, but in so many cases such ‘babies’ were conjectures. Many researchers of the modern era do attempt to consult original source material, yet many are also content to quote ancient authorities; a matter of writing in an academic form which is bereft of academic substance.

Mr. Burke offered his conjecture that the Lancelot Bathurst of Virginia was of the Bathursts of Lechlade, Gloucestershire, on the basis that a Lancelot Bathurst of that place was of age to be he noted in Virginia; although his familial associations in England were not evident in Virginia, wherehas those of a Lancelot Bathurst of Northamptonshire most certainly were. This could have been discovered by research, something that the genealogical copyists of old neither had the the time nor inclination for.

What follows, in part, is nothing more than my own conjecture, but it is at least based on a reality that marked the period under consideration – that families within an English kinship network continued to intermarry over successive generations, and if their familial associations in England were not evident in Virginia then it is almost certain that a wrong origin of Virginia families has been ascribed.

Also, what follows is nothing more than a skimming of the genealogical surface. Any enquiry of depth into the families mentioned in this account would have to consider such obscurities as manorial records, written in obscure hands, and generally a hurdle too far for the average enquirer. It is with this caveat that what follows is offered as anything remotely substantive.

THE TRUE ORIGINS OF LAWRENCE BATHURST OF VIRGINIA (I suggest).

1. Lawrence Bathurst, d. 1549.
1.1. Edward Bathurst, b. before 1513, d. after 1558.
1.1.1. Launcelot Bathurst, b. 1529, Staplehurst, Kent, ob. Sept. 27, 1594, St. Mary Bathow, London, m. Judith Randolph, da. of Bernard Randolph, and sister of John Randolph, who m. (April 3, 1570) Isabella Lunsford, born 1553, in Wileigh, Ticehurst. Her Will, pr. October 7, 1585. John Randolph had issue: Bernard Randolph, born 1568, of Biddenden, Kent, gent., whose Will was pr. May 27, 1628, requesting ‘To my daughter Elizabeth, wife of Robert Perry, having already advanced her at her marriage with a competent portion, twenty shillings and no greater legacy’.

(The said Robert Perry was the br. of Richard Perry, 1580-1649, who m. Dunes Hicks; they being the parents of Richard Perry, collector of customs and excise, in Glasgow, 1656, and a merchant in Clonmell, Ireland, in 1657, where he had family connections, being cousin of William Perry, of Limerick, who maintained a house in Stepney. Richard’s son was Micajah Perry, Oct. 10, 1641-1721: Micajah Perry of the parish of Mary-le-Bow, London, ‘haberdasher’, received a license on Oct. 20, 1663 to marry ‘Ann Owen of the parish of St Swithin, London, spinster’; her father being Dr. Richard Owen, a distinguished clergyman, son of Cadwaladr Owen, (1562–1617), by Blanche, da. of John Roberts, younger br. to Lewis Anwyl of Park, Merionethshire. (For Owen pedigree, see footnote 1).

Isabella’s br., John Lunsford, m. Anne Apsley; their son, Thomas Lunsford, born circ. 1575 (son of Sir Thomas Lunsford and his first wife, Barbara Lewknor) m. 1. Katherine Fludd, March 7, 1598, in Greenwich, St. Alphage, Kent, their son being Sir Thomas Lunsford, about whom it was said that he had a reputation as a swaggering ruffian “who neither fears God nor man”. He witnessed the land purchase of fellow royalist emigrant, Sir Fleetwood Dormer, on 26 Dec. 1649.

Katherine Fludd was the aunt of Colonel John Fludd, b. 1603 in Chichester, Sussex, d. 1658 in Surry Co. Virginia, who m. 2. Margaret Finch, widow of William Finch, in 1624, 3. Fortune Jordan, who subsequently m. James Mills (Miles). John Flood Jr. (by a first marriage) was listed as age 44 in 1659 when he testified he was living at Thomas Gray’s house; his dau., Jane, m. Thomas Lane, son of Thomas Lane, 1635-1708, of Surry Co., who m. (1661) Elizabeth Jones, widow of Fulk Jones.

Thomas Lane Sr. was almost certainly the son of a younger brother of William Lane of Horton, Northamponshire, who appeared in the Muster of Mr. Edward Waters, Elizabeth City Co., as aged 30, who came to Virginia in the Bona Nova in 1620. William Lane m. Ann Isham, dau. of John Isham of Pitchley, and cousin of Mary Isham, wife of Sir Fleetwood Dormer.

In relation to the Lanes connection to the Perrys, Jacob Price (see hereinafter) makes a subsiduary point – many landed families of Northamptonshire, such as the Lanes, Ishams, and Washingtons, dispatched their younger sons to Virginia, in the hope of reviving family fortune. An overarching theme was that of the Civil War, in which many ‘royalist’ families sought refuge overseas.

Fortune (Jordan) Mills (Miles), a relative of Capt. George Jordan, stated, in a deposition of Sept. 1660, that “Bartholomew Owens had several times, in her hearing, spoken disparaging and scandalous words against the Commissioners and wholly against Capt. Jordan, saying he never would have justice. “Bartholomew jumped up in court, saying “I’ll say as I like to those foxes.” The commissioners advised him to “desist from these scandelous and malicious words, that he durst not say those things in the presence of these gentlemen”, but Owen answered them with “fearful oaths” to their faces and would not stop.

In March, 1661, Bartholomew Owen bought 200 acres of land from Christopher Lewis (who was probably the son of Richard Lewis and Frances Miles), which is suggestive of a kinship relationship, if the propositions that Bartholomew Owen was  kin of the Coetmors is allowed; see hereinafter. This lady was contemporary with Rowland Coetmore, mariner, who m. 2. 28 Mar. 1594, at St. Mary, Whitchapel, Dorothy, da. of Dorothy Lane, relict of William Harris, of Wapping, mariner; 3. Katherine Miles, widow of Thomas Gray of Harwich. Lowry Coetmore was probably one of Rowland’s seven sisters.

Rowland Coetmore is described as ‘of Coetmor in Llechwedd Uchaf, co. Caernarvon’, and as a son (of six) of William Coetmore and Jane Williams, and grandson of William Coetmor and Elin Pulleston. (David Faris Plantagenet Ancestry of 17th Century Colonists, pp. 73-75, 1996).

Elin Pulleston was the relict of Morris ap Ellis of Clenennau, and, therefore, ancestress of a family  of Owen, see hereinafter.

Rowland Coetmor was employed by the East India Company, being master of the ‘Royal James’, trading out of Bombay in 1618, when he and other mariners made a contribution towards the building of a new chapel at Wapping, in the parish of Stepney, London. He was warden of this chappel in 1622; a plaque there commemorates him. His Will was proved 24 Nov. 1626 (P.C.C., 125 Hele).

Such a convergence of names associated in one generation and repeated in following ones almost invariably points to the continuation of associations of an English kinship network.

In 1677, Bartholomew Owen sold his neighbour, Nicholas Meriweather, perhaps his nephew, 100 acres of land, also making him his attorney. On 31 Jan. 1677, Johanna, Bartholomew’s wife, was made administrator of his estate. Four children were named: Robert, Katherine, William, and Thomas. The Will of Christopher Lewis, dated 1 Sept. 1673, makes small bequests Godchildren: Solomon Davis, Luke Measell, and Katherine Owen).

1.1.1.1. Randolph Bathurst, m. Katherine Argall, da. of Richard Argall and Mary Scott. The Will of Henry Bathurst of Horton Kirby, co. Kent, gent., dated 1 March 1619, mentions Catherine, wife of brother Randolph Bathurst Esq.; brother Lancelot Bathurst; uncle Paule Bathurst Esq.; uncle Timothy Bathurst; cousins Samuel, Timothy, James, and Martha, ch. of uncle Timothy Bathurst; uncle Robert Bathurst; Martha ‘now wife of Thomas Browne of Horton Kirby, Esq.’, and his daughters, Martha Browne and Maryon Browne; cousin Thomas Venables and his wife; Edward Small and Joan his wife, and Martha their daughter; Brother Edward Bathurst and his son Thomas, ‘my god-son’; sister Mary, wife of brother Edward Bathurst; brother Edward ‘my diamond ring’, and his wife Mary, ‘my watch’. He bequsted to ‘the poor of Horton Kirby and S’ Mary Boshawe’, London. (P.C.C., 29 Soame).

1.1.1.1.1. Lancelot Bathurst, Alderman of St Mary Botolph, London, d. 26 Sept. 1596 (Drake 84), in the fourth generation from the first Laurence Bathurst, was the Bathurst who built a house in the parish of Bathurst, Horton Kirby, Kent, called Franks, which descended to his eldest son, Randolph. He m. Judith, da. of Barnard Randolph of London; who remar. to Sir Edward Kinaston of Otley.

THE BATHURSTS OF NORTHAMPTONSHIRE

1.1.1.1.1.1. George Bathurst, 1587-1651, lived at Hothorpe in Northamptonshire, as dower of his wife, Elizabeth Villiers (m. 1610); da. of Edward Villiers. This large royalist family suffered greatly in the Civil War, with six of their sons being killed. (Andrew Pyle (editor), Dictionary of Seventeenth Century British Philosophers (2000), pp. 74–75).

1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Sir Edward Bathurst, born 1608/9.

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Sir Thomas Bathurst of Franks, born 1628; Will proved Jan. 1689-90. (P.C.C., Exton, 29).

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Francis Bathurst, of Franks, Esq., born 1667; bur. at Horton Kirby, 8 March 1738. Will proved May 1739. (P.C.C., Henchman, 93); son Lancelot died s.p.; bur. 1 Aug. 1720. Franks was a manor in Horton Kirby, Kent, where Sir Thomas Walsingham had a mansion, and where the family of Lane had a residence.

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.2. Lancelot Bathurst, Esq. :- ‘Articles of agreement for inclosure between the freeholders of Hothorpe co. Northants (the manor of George Bathurst and his descendants), viz. (1) Launcelott Bathurst Esq. (6) Edward Marston and Mary Marston his mother'(East Sussex Record Office (ESRO), ref. Sus/A/YO606, 14 May 1666). The same tenements were associated with Edward Meriwether: ‘Edward Meriwether, plaintiff, Edward Marston, gent. and Mary, his wife, Thomas Burton and Elizabeth, his wife and Robert Wickenden otherwise Wiggenden, deforciants’ (ESRO, ref. Sus/A/U908/T35/8, 1657). Similar articles of agreement concerned Lancelot’s brothers, Henry (Northamptonshire Record Office (NRO), ref. YO 161, 20 March 1649; and Ralph, jointly with Lancelot (NRO, ref. YO 174, 1 April 1662).

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.2.1. Mary Bathurst, m. Francis Meriwether, whose estate was admin. by Bartholomew Owen.

(1. Edward Meriwether, June 28, 1564 – October 22, 1621, of Barfreystone juxta Shepherdswell, m. (October 15, 1593) Ursula Shrubsole.
1.1. Edward Meriwether Gent, b. 1598, bur. 18 May 1647, Barfrestone, Kent (Tyler Index to Parish Registers).
1.1.1. Edward Meriwether.
1.1.2. Nicholas Meriwether of Virginia, I suggest, m. Elizabeth (Owen?).
1.1.2.1. Francis Meriwether, m. Mary Bathurst.
1.1.2.2. Nicholas Meriwether).

PERRY AND PYRANT

(The said Francis Merriwether was the brother of he who was associated with the family of Pyrant (Perient), given here: Lands of St. Pauls Parish made into precincts Sept. 24, 1708. ‘The lands of Maj. Nicholas Meriwether, James Pyrant, John Pyrant, and Jno. Giles made one precinct of which the said Nicho. Meriweather and Jno. Giles were appointed overseers. The dividing line between George Thomas, Nicholas Meriwether & James Pyrant’s land was processioned by us. James Pirant and John Pirant was present. John Pyrants land was not near the others‘ … ‘Samuel Rather of St. Paul’s Parish, Hanover Co to Richard Tyree of St. Peter’s Parish, James City Co, for 60 lbs, 200 acres in St. Paul’s Parish (Hanover) binding the lands of John Anderson Gent, late dec’d, and George Thomas late of this county, now in possession of Dannet Abney and the land formerly of Nicholas Merriweather now in the possession of James Pyrant'(1734).

James Pyrant’s sister m. William Easley, c. 1725. The Perrys intermarried with the Easleys: William Easley, Robertson Co., TN, Deed Book X, p. 233, 7 March 1828 – ‘Joseph Perry to Jane Easley, his daughter, tract on east side of Big Buzzard. 200 acres. Not to be subject to any indebtedness of Jane Easley’s husband, William Easley. Robertson Co., TN, Deed Book 7, p. 451, Jan. 9, 1851, recorded Oct. 11, 1852 – ‘William Easley and Jane his wife, Joseph P. Easley, Pleasant Easley, G. W. Easley and his wife, Nancy Easley, Louisa Easley, William J. Easley, Jr., M. Easley, John G. Easley, R. B. Easley, H. T. Easley, all of County of Macoupin, State of Illinois, to Calvin Hart of Robertson County, TN. Consideration $100 for land on east side of Big Buzzard Creek. 100 acres. William Pyrant Easley’.

The said Joseph Perry, who emigrated from Ireland, most likely had strong family connections to Micajah and Philip Perry, and Thomas Lane (the continuators of ‘Perry and Lane’, and kin of the descendants of John Perry of Woodrooff, co. Tipperary), allowing the reasonable suggestion that Joseph Perry was the son of John Perry of Cork, who, in the 1750’s, was trading extensively with the West Indies, Boston, Philadelphia, and New York).

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.3. Ralph Bathurst, a distingushed wit, according to Collins, studied divinity at Oriel Coll, Oxf., but later became a ‘Doctor of physic’, only to return to his former calling after the Restoration, becoming the King’s chaplain and President of Trinity Coll. in 1664; where he was bur. 24 June 1704, aet. 80.

RELIGION/POLITICS AS A GENEALOGICAL CONNECTOR

The Bathursts had strong association with Oriel College. A reason suggested by by Jacob Price (Perry of London, a Family and a Firm on the Seaborne Frontier, p. 19, 2010) for the association of Micajah Perry and his partner, Thomas Lane, is a common acquantance with Dr. Richard Owen of Oriel College, who married Thomas Lane and Mary Puckle in St. Swithins, in 1679. Thomas Lane’s uncle was a Fellow of Oriel College, as was Cadwaladr Owen, father of Dr. Richard Owen.

These Owens were a common thread in the weave of these families. Ipso facto, Bartholomew Owen was also a member of this family of Owen.

Thomas Lane was a younger son of Thomas Lane of Dodford, Northamptonshire, a descendant of Ralph Lane of Hogshaw & Horton, d. 1540, and Maud Parr, da. of William Parr, Lord of Horton, and kin of Sir William Lane of Glendon and Horton, d. 1615, who m. Mary Andrews, da. of Sir Thomas Andrew of Charwelton. The connection between the Bathurst and Andrews family is evidenced in an indenture counterpart of assignment between (1) Ralph Bathurst and ‘Launcellot Bathurst of London, merchant‘, and (2) George Andrews of Hothorpe, yeoman, and William Payne of Sibbertoft, yeoman, and Thomas Towers of West Haddon, yeoman, reciting that 20 June 1649 Henry Bathurst of Hothorpe, gent., did by statute Staple acknowledge a debt to George Bathurst of Hothorpe, Esq., deceased, late father of the said Henry, of £7000 payable on the feast of St James following. (NRO, ref. YO 603. 1 April 1662.

As given, Micajah Perry’s partner, Thomas Lane, m. Mary Puckle, and the Edward Bathurst who m. Mary’s sis., Susanna, was almost certainly of this branch of the Bathurst family. He was an agent for Micajah Perry in Maryland, in 1704. (Am. Col. 1st Ser.59. Lane’s Will, pr. Nov. 10, 1710, states: ‘If my wife marry again, I give her sister Susanna Bathurst and her daughter Susanna £200 apiece’. ‘Thomas Lane of St. Catherine, Coleman, London bachelor, 40, and Mary Puckle of St. Catherine Creechurch, London, spinster 20, her parents dead and she at the disposal of her uncle Gray, of same, who consents … at St. Swithin. (Wm. & Mary Col. Quar. xviii., pp. 104-105). Edward Bathurst is evidenced in Bathurst v Puckle. Nat. Arch. ref. C 9/436/15. 1697.

Micajah Perry m. Anne Owen, da. of Dr. Richard Owen.

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.4. George Bathurst, B.D., d. 1644, Fellow of Trinity Coll., 1634.

1.1.1.1.1.1.1.5. Benjamin Bathurst, Governor of the East India Co., 1668-1689, d. 27 April, 1704.

1.1.1.1.1.1.2. Launcelott Bathurst, 1610-1677 (P.C.C., Reeve, 10), m. 1. Anne Blatwight ‘in the parish of Wilmington Mar. 28 1637 Lanslelott Bathurst of Horton and Anne Blatwight of Willmington, maryed by Lycence from my lord of Cant’; 2. Ann Gamon: ‘Lancelot Bathurst, of Wilmington, Kent, gent, widower, and Anne Gamon of St Mary le Strand, alias Savoy, Middlesex, spinster, 27, daughter of Richard Gamon of same who consents – at St Mary, Savoy, aforesaid. 14 July 1669’.(LML).

Wilmington (par. church St Michael and All Angels) is 6 mls fr. Eltham, and 5 mls fr. S. Mary Cray. St Michael and All Angels and S. Mary Cray are in the diocese of Rochester. It is certain that this Lancelot Bathurst would have listened to sermons of Dr. Richard Owen, the renowned theologian and royalist ‘martyr’, of Eltham.

Will of Lancelot Bathurst of Barnend in the parish of Willmington, co. Kent. Dated 30 May 1672. Buried in the Church of Willmington under the same stone as beloved wife Mrs. Anne Bathurst. Leaves his capital messuage or mansion house called Barnend, with barns, stables, dove-house, cart-houses, gardens, cherry orchards, etc., to his wife Mrs Anne Bathurst, daughter of Richard Gamon, gent., for life. Failing any issue to himself and wife then the property is to go to Francis Bathurst, Esq., eldest son of his nephew Sir Thomas Bathurst of Franks in the parish of Horton Kirby, Knight, and for default of such issue then it is to go to his brother Samuel Bathurst and his heirs. Mentions brother and sister
Ward. Sister Walters and her daughter Elizabeth Dormer. Mentions his brother, Sir Edward Bathurst. Proved on London 8 Feb. 1677. (P.C.C., 10, Reeve). Where the Bathursts kin of Fleetwood Dormer?

The Will of Sir Thomas Bathurst, of Franks, in the parish of Horton Kirby, co. Kent, dated 15 May 1686, bequests his mother £20 p.a. for her lifetime out of lands, &c, in ‘Swanlie’, co. Kent; and mentions his ‘loving wife Dame Mary Bathurst’ … sons Francis Bathurst and Lancelot Bathurst, ‘and if these die without issue to his wife Mary for her life and then to the heirs male of the body of my uncle George Bathurst, deceased, and failing issue to him then to my honored cousin Sir Benjamin Bathurst and his heirs male’. Proved in London, 20 March 1687. (P.C.C., 29, Exton).

1.1.1.1.2. Edward Bathurst.

1.2.2. Paul Bathurst, Clothier, m. (1568) Elizabeth, da.. of Sir Edward Horden, bur. at Goudhurst in 1594. They had seven sons and four daughters.

1.2.2.1. William Bathurst, probably m. a sister of Robert Lunsford of Hollington, whose Will was pr. January 24, 1611. He was of the same family as Thomas Lunsford (‘of Wylie’), who m. Katherine Fludd, and very probably a cousin of John Lunsford, born 1551. (See footnote 2.).

Footnote 1.

OWEN

The received Owen pedigree is chronological problematic, with John Owen, Walsingham’s secretary, in some accounts, being made the father of Sir John Owen, loyalist commander, by a dau. or granddau. of Sir William Morris; he being b. Apr. 1542, 1st s. of Morris ap Ellis of Clenennau and Elin, da. of Sir John Puleston, (she m. 2., as given, William Coetmor); who m. (1) 28 Sept. 1556, Margaret (d. 17 Feb. 1572), da. and h. of John Wyn Lacon of Llanddyn, Llangollen, Denb. and Brogyntyn, Salop 6s. d.v.p. 3da. (1 d.v.p.); 2. 22 Aug. 1575, Elin, da. and coh. of Hugh ap Llewelyn ap Meredith of Brynddu, Llanfechell, Anglesey, wid. of John Lewis* of Chwaen Wen, Llantrisant, Anglesey, s.p.; (3) 1605, Jane, da. and h. of Rowland Puleston of Caernarvon, wid. of Sir Thomas Jones of Abermarlais, Carm., s.p. suc. fa. 1575; kntd. 23 July 1603. d. 10 Aug. 1622. sig. Will[ia]m Maurice. (History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1604-1629, ed. Andrew Thrush and John P. Ferris, 2010). *Perhaps of some relevance to the ancestry of Christopher Lewis of Virginia.

Walsingham took up his position in 1573, and any secretary would normally be 30 years of age, at least. John Venn (Alumni Cantabrigiensis) records a son of Robert Owen of Bodsilin, John Owen, being being born in 1543 and matriculating at Christ’s Coll., Easter 1560, and being bur. 21 March 1592. The same record clearly show his son to be John 0wen, bapt. 13 Nov. 1580.; MA from Jesus Coll. 1600, DD 1617. Chaplain of Charles I. Bishop of St Asaph, 1629-1651; impeached by Parliament for High Treason. This is at variance with the heraldic account, which has the Bishop of St Asaph being a son of Robert Owen’s br., Owen Owen. Robert Owen m., secondly, Lowry Coetmor, and a son by this marriage was likely to have been the father of Sir John Owen.

Whatever the case, such considerations are not directly relevant to the ancestry of Bartholomew Owen, yet analysis of the heraldic account of the Owens of Bodsilin places him within their context.

THE OWENS OF BODSILIN AND CLENENNAU

1. John ap Meyrick, of Bodsilin in Malltraeth, Llanfeirian, co. Carnarvon, m. Angharad, da. of Gruffydd ap Howel ap Madog ap Ieuan ap Einion, of Lleyn.
1.1. Robert Owen, of Bodsilin, m. Gwenhwyfer, da. of William ap Meredydd ap Rev. Rowland Hughes of Brynis. (See  Owen v Owen. Plaintiffs: Robert Owen, student of Lyon’s Inn, London. Defendants: Morris, Owen and Hugh ap John ap Meyricke. Subject: Life-interest of Gwenhover, late the wife of Robert ap John ap Meyryke, in messuages and lands in Trevenigan and Trewillmet. Anglesey. (Nat. Arch. ref. C 1/1458/38. 1556-1558).
1.1.1. Owen Owen of Bodsilin, m. Angharad, da. of David ap William ap Griffith, of Cochwillan.
1.1.1.1. Robert Owen of Bodsilin, fl. 1588, m 1. Anne Wynn, da. of John Wynn, of Hirdrefaig.
1.1.1.1.1. John Owen, of Bodsilin, b. 1543, matric Christ’s Col, Easter 1560, bur. 21 March 1592.
1.1.1.1. Robert Owen of Bodsilin, m. 2. Lowry Coetmor, da. of William Coetmor.
1.1.1.1.2. Robert Owen, m. Judith Holland, da. of Edward Holland.
1.1.1.1.3. William Owen of Glyn, Dwygyfylchi & Trwyn y Wylfa, m. Catherine Williams.
1.1.1.1.4. John Owen, d. 1611-2, secretary of Lord Walsingham, m. Ellen, da. of William Wynne Morris of Clenneney, she m 2. Sir Francis Eure, of Porkington.
1.1.1.1.3.1. Sir John Owen of Clenneneu, d 1666, Gocernor of Conway Castle, m. Janet Vaughan, da. of Griffith Vaughan, of Corsygedol.
1.1.1.1.3.1.1. William Owen, of Porkington and Clenneney m., in 1648, Catherine Anwill, da. of Lewis Anwill, of Park.
1.1.1.2. William Owen, fl. 1605, rector of Heneglwys.
1.1.1.3. Owen Owen, d. 1592, Archdeacon of Anglesey, rector of Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, m. Jane Griffith, da. of Robert Griffith, Constable of Carnarvon Castle. As given, he is suggested by some to be the father of John Owen, Bishop of St. Asaphs, bapt. 13 Nov. 1580, d. 16 Oct. 1651, who m. 1. Sarah Hodelow, of Burton Latimer (Northamptonshire), 2. Elizabeth Gray; 3. Elin, da. of Robert Wyn of Conway. As his uncle or father, he was described as ‘Clerk and Parson’ when he became rector of Burton Latimer in 1608, having succeeded his brother-in-law, Edward Puleston. He and his first two wives, Sarah Hodilow of Cambridge and Elizabeth Gray, had nine children baptised at Burton Latimer, four of whom died and are buried there.
1.1.1.3.1. Margaret Owen, m. Edward Puleston, of Llwyn Cnotiau.

Cambrian Quarterly, 1831: ‘Robert Owen, of Bodsilin, he was a stranger by birth in this comot, and held but very little lands from Evan Llwyd, and what he held he had from Mali, the daughter of Evan Llwyd, who was married to Llewelyn Llwyd ab Hwlcyn, who had issue Meuric, who had issue John, who had issue Robert, who had issue Owen, who had issue Robert Owen, supra, who did dwell at Bodsilin, by reason his mother had Trergd for terme of life; by reason he was secondly married to Lowry Coetmor, who once settled at Bodsilin (being but a small tenement, and an uncouth habitation) would not remove hence to Trergd, so far from her friends, though it was a better dwelling. But the most land that Robert Owen had in Uchaled was the third part of the lands of David ab William, ab Gryffydd, ab Robin, which came unto him from his mother Angharad, the daughter and coheir of David ab William, who was co-partner with her sisters Jane and Agnes, of which land Sir John Bodvil, knight, had the parte belonging unto Jane, and David Lloyd the parte belonging to Agnes. By these branches, above mentioned, every understanding man may know how many honourable and worthy personages, in the county of Caernarvon, and counties adjoining, are descended from Jarddur, and so from Helig ab Glanawg. Robert Owen’s arms quartered Jardur.

DISTINCT FAMILIES OF OWEN AS KIN

1. John Puleston, m. Catherine Stanley.
1.1. Eleanor Puleston, m. William Coetmor, fl. 1568.
1.1.1. William Coetmor, m. Jane Williams.
1.1.1.1. Rowland Coetmor, as given heretofore.
1.1.1.2. Grace Coetmor, m. Robert Vaughan.
1.1.1.2.1. Elizabeth Vaughan, m. William Owen, Rector of Llanfachreth, d. 1645.
1.1.1.3. Robert Coetmor, m. Lumley Lloyd.
1.1.1.3.1. Richard Coetmor, Mabli Anwyl, da. of William Lewis Anwyl, of Park, and Elizabeth Herbert, of Cenmaes, da. of Edward Herbert, of Cemmaes.
1.1.1.4. Lowry Coetmor, m. Robert Owen.
1.1.2. Edward Coetmor, m. Margaret Roberts, of Castellmarch, Llanbedrog, Lleyn.
1.1.2.1. Jane Coetmor, m. John Owen, Rector Of Llangybni.

ANWYL

1. Robert ap Morys, of Park, fourth son of Morris ap John ap Meredydd of Rhiwaedog, whose exploits are recorded in the History of the Gwydir Family by Sir John Wynn, fl. 1544, m. Lowry, da. of Lewis ap Ifan ap Dafydd, of Pengwern.
1.1. Lewis Anwyl, of Park, Llanfrother, d. 1605, m 1. Elizabeth, da. of Morys ap Ifan ap Sion.
1.1.1. William Lewis Anwyl, of Park, Sherif of Merionethshire, fl. 1611, m. Elizabeth Herbert, da. of Edward Herbert of Cemmaes.
1.1.1.1. Lewis Anwyl of Park, b 1596, m 1. Frances Jones, 1603-1633, da. of Sir William Jones, of Castellmarch.
1.1.1.1.1. Catherine Anwill, d. 1685, m. William Owen of Porkington and Clenennau.
1.1.1.2. Robert Anwyl, of Park, Sheriff of Merionethshire, d. 1653, m. Catherine Owen, da. of Sir John Owen of Clenennau, sister of William Owen, of Porkington.
1.2. John Roberts Esq.
1.2.1. Blanch Roberts, m. Cadwalader Owen, A. M., vicar of Llanbrynmair, and rector of Lianfechar, com. Montgomery
1.2.1.1. Dr. Richard Owen, of more anon.

The Anwyl family trace their descent from Owain Gwynedd, King of Gwynedd, 1137-70, through his sixth son, Rhodri ap Owain Gwynedd, d. 1195.

THE OWENS OF RHIWSAESON

1. David Lloyd Blayney, c. 1515-1595, m. Elizabeth Gwyn, d. 1590; da. of Lewis Gwyn (Jones), Constable of Bishop’s Castle; that is: Lewis Gwyn ap Jenkin ap Llewelyn ap Gwylim ap Rees Lloyd ap Adam (of Brecknock) ap Howell ap Einion Sai.

1.1. Lucy BLayney, m. Maurice Owen, Esq., of Rhiwsaeson, fl. 1612; that is: Morris Owen ap Richard ap Morris ap Owen. (See Mervyn Archall, A.M., The Peerage of Ireland: Or, A Genealogical History of the Present Nobility of that Kingdom, 1789). Maurice Owen was the eldest son of Richard Morris. of Rhiwsaeson, Sheriff in 1579.

1.1.1. Athelstan Owen, deputy sheriff, noted here: Owen v Herbert. Plaintiffs: Morris Owen. Defendants: Margaret Herbert and Athelstan Owen. Subject: messuages and lands in the parish of Llanbrynmair, Montgomeryshire. (Nat. Arch. ref. 2/JasI/O2/19. 1603-1612.

1.1.2. Richard Owen, M.A.

1.1.3. Rowland Owen. About 1609, Matthew Herbert, lessee of Penrhos Mill (also known as Y Felingerrig), bought a suit in the Exchequer against Rowland Owen and Hugh ap Ieuan Lloyd, being freeholders within the lordship of Cyfeiliog, owners of Melin Y Garth (Garth Mill) and Y Felin Newydd (New Mill on the Gwydol River), and who had withdrawn their own suit of mill called Penrhos Mill. Matthew Herbert was the first Herbert to live at Dolguog. His great uncle William, he first earl of Pembroke, was one of the influential members of the King’s Council of State on the accession of Edward IV. William held numerous offices which, in effect, gave in supreme control over the south and parts of North Wales. He was eventually granted the stewardship of castles, lordships and manors in Carmarthen, Cardigan, Brecknock, Pembroke and Merioneth. Matthew Herbert’s brother was Richard Herbert of Mongomery Castle who was father to the famous poet George Herbert (1593-1633) and the famous philosopher, historian and diplomatist Edward. Lord of Chirbury (1583-1648). Matthew Herbert’s father, Edward Herbert of Montgomery, was sheriff of Montgomeryshire in 1557 and 1568.

1.1.4. Cadwaladr Owen, 1562-1617, proposed by the Herberts as vicar of Llanbrynmair, matriculated at Jesus College, Oxford, Nov. 24, 1581; graduated B.A. in 1583, M.A. in 1588, and B.D. in 1603; and was elected fellow of Oriel College in 1585. In 1597, he was acting as Sir Robert Harley’s tutor at Oriel College. He was appointed to the rectory of Llanfechain in Montgomeryshire in 1601, made vicar of Llanbrynmair in the same county in 1608, and sinecure rector of the same place in 1610. He was buried at Llanfechain on 6 April 1617 (Parish Register). He is said to have been a great disputant. Wood says that he had ‘heard he was a writer,’ but knew nothing of his works.

1.1.4.1. ‘Dr. Richard Owen, son of Cadwallader Owen, sometime fellow of Oriel Coll., afterwards minister of Llanvechen in Mon meshire, was born in that county, entred into the said coll. an. 1620, aged 15 years, or thereabouts, and made fellow thereof in 1627, he being then bach. of arts. Afterwards he proceeded in that faculty, took holy orders, and in 1635 he was presented by the university of Oxon to the vicaridge of Eltham in Kent. In 1638, he resigned his fellowship, and the same year took the degree of bach. of divinity, being at that time the rector of S. Swithin‘s, London. In the beginning of the civil wars he adhered to his majesty, and was therefore thrown out of his livings, that of S. Swithins being lost in 1644-8, or thereabouts, and suffered much, for about 17 years time, for the royal cause. After the return of king Charles II. he was restored to what he had lost, became minister of S. Mary Cray in Kent, and was actually created doct. of div. of this university, and in high esteem for his holy life and conversation, for is orthodoxness in judgment, conformity to the true, ancient doctrine and discipline of the church of England, and in the former revolutions for his loyalty to his sacred majesty. He hath also translated into English all, or most of, the satyrs of Juvenal, which I have not yet seen, and hath written something of controversy. He dyed about the latter end of January in sixteen hundred and eighty and two, and was buried in the chancel of the church at Eltham before-mentioned, having had some dignity in the church.

Richard Owen was the son of Cadwalader Owen A. M. vicar of Llanbrynmair, and rector of Lianfechar, com. Montgomery, by his wife Blanch, the da. of John Roberts esq. younger brother to Lewis Anwyl of Park in com. Merion. esq. This Cadwalader Owen, who, as I think, was of Oriel coll., was in his time reputed a great disputant, and generally called by the name of sic docco. He was instituted to the sine cura of Llanbrynmair Febr. 10, 1610, being vicar before of the same place. He was also rector of Llanfechan, and (as Lewis Dwn in his herald’s visitation sayth) was a justice of the peace in com. Montgomery. He dyed in 1617. I have heard he was a writer, but what he writ, I know not. He published a Latin sermon called Paulus Multifirmis, on 1. Car. 9. 22. and perhaps others. He had some lands of inheritance from his ancestors in the parish of Tracefynydd, com. Merionith, which he sold to Sir Thomas Middleton of Chirk’. (Athenæ Oxonienses, vol. 4, Anthony Wood/Phillip Bliss, 1820). Tracefynydd is Trawsfynydd, in which land was held by the Anwyl family.

Dr. Richard Owen married, firstly, Anne, ‘his virtuous and dear wife’, who died giving birth to her tenth child on 12 March 1652; secondly, Amy Kidwell, widow of Eltham, articles of marriage dated 4 Feb. 1653, being father by her of Thomas and Amy Owen. Robert Kidwell gent., of Eltham, prob. 12 Jan. 1636 (Pile 4), relict Anne. (Index of Kent Wills). He was of Bkackheath, Bromley, and Dartford, Kent. (Nat. Arch. refs. E 115/236/105, E 115/234/3). He worked in the Royal Household.

Lyson – Inscription written by Dr. Owen.—- M. C. ‘In the middle of this chancel doe rest, waiting for the last trump, Ann the virtuous dear wife of Dr. Richard Owen, who died in childbed of their 10th, March 12, 1652-3; Richard, their eldest son, a year old, buried Mar. 24, 1641-2; Charles, their third, carried from the womb to the tomb, July 5, 1648; Edward, their fourth, who lived 27 years, grew to be a learned man, Master of Arts, Fellow of Magdalen College, in Oxford, took holy orders, a solid preacher, died of a consumption, and was buried July 15, 1678; James, their fifth, the mother’s sorrow, buried, fix months old, Sep. 27, 1653; Mary, their second daughter, buried in her 31st year, Oct. 7, 1675; Jane, their fourth, taken off in her prime, aged 20, buried Mar. 11, 1663-4, Blainch, their fifth, buried in the third year of her age, Nov. 8, 1649; Thomas, his third son by his second wife, Amy, now living, (George, the elder by her, being lost at sea in the year 1674, the great hope, joy, and grief of the parents, beloved of all, aged 23, buried April 26, 1679’.

Thus, Sir John Owen and Cadwaladr Owen were both connected to the Anwyls; ipso facto, they were of the same kinship group, and had ties in common to such as the Coetmors.

BARTHOLOMEW OWEN

Bartholomew Owen, a notorious disputant, noted in Virginia in the mid 1650’s, coinciding with the Royalist defeat in the English Civil War, and the harsh treatment of such as Sir John Owen, may have descended from a br. of Cadwaladr Owen, but was more likely to have been a nephew of Dr. Richard Owen, whose sermons he very likely attended, as the Bathursts, Lanes, and Perrys.

1. Maurice Owen, Esq., of Rhiwsaeson, fl. 1612; that is: Morris Owen ap Richard ap Morris ap Owen, m. Lucy Blayney, da. of  David Lloyd Blayney, and Elizabeth Gwyn; da. of Lewis Gwyn (Jones), Constable of Bishop’s Castle; that is: Lewis Gwyn ap Jenkin ap Llewelyn ap Gwylim ap Rees Lloyd ap Adam (of Brecknock) ap Howell ap Einion Sai.
1.1. Cadwaladr Owen, vicar of Llanbrynmair, matriculated at Jesus College, Oxford, Nov. 24, 1581; graduated B.A. in 1583, M.A. in 1588, and B.D. in 1603; and was elected fellow of Oriel College in 1585; m. Blanch, the da. of John Roberts, Esq., younger brother to Lewis Anwyl Esq., of Park, in com. Merion.
1.1.1. Dr. Richard Owen, fellow of Oriel College.
1.1.1.1. Ann Owen, m. Micajah Perry, whose partner, Thomas Lane, was married by Dr. Richard Owen.
1.1.2. … Owen.
1.1.2.1. Bartholomew Owen, who administered the estate of Francis Meriwether, husband of Mary Bathurst, niece of Ralph Bathurst, of Oriel College.

Footnote 2.

LUNSFORD

To repeat and continue:

Bernard Randolph had issue John Randolph, who m. (April 3, 1570) Isabella Lunsford, born 1553, in Wileigh, Ticehurst, East Sussex. Her Will, pr. October 7, 1585, mentions Launcelott Bathurste as an executor ‘of my late father in law Barnard Randolphe deceased’. Isabella’s br., John Lunsford, b. 1551, m. Anne Apsley; their son, Thomas Lunsford, of Wyleigh, born circ. 1575, m. (1) Katherine Fludd, March 7, 1598, in Greenwich, St. Alphage, Kent, son of Sir Thomas Lunsford and his first Barbara Lewknor.

John Lunsford and Anne Apsley were the parents of Herbert Lunsford, b. February 5, 1591 in Wileigh. Deed. August 28, 1630: Anthony Apsley, aforesd. & John his eldest son to Herbert Lunsford of East Hoadly Co. Sussex, esq. (later knighted) & William Muddle of Ewehurst Co. Sussex, esq.; Deed for the settlement of the manors aforesd. & providing portions for younger children.

Herbert Randolphe’s br., Bernard Randolphe, had issue: Edmond Randolphe, mentioned thus in the Will (pr. March 21, 1625) of Samuel Argall, who ‘beinge now preste to seme his Maiestie in a voyage intended by sea, … to my niece Katherine Barham’s son, my godson … I give and bequeath unto my loving brother in law Edmond Randolf Esq. the sum of twenty pounds to be paid unto him within six months next after my decease’. The said Bernard’s Will bequesting: ‘To my daughter Elizabeth, wife of Robert Perry, having already advanced her at her marriage with a competent portion, twenty shillings and no greater legacy’ (Barnard Randolph of Biddenden, Kent, gent., Will May 2, 1628, pr. May 27, 1628).

John Lunsford, b. 1551, was the probable cousin of Robert Lunsford of Hollington, whose Will was proved January 24, 1611. He was mentioned in the Will of the said Herbert Lunsford, pr. September 28, 1604: ‘my loving brother-in-law Anthony Apsley … my manor of Filsham (n.b.) in Sussex … and Judith Apsley his wife, my very loving sister … lately devised to Robert Lunsforde of Hollington, yeoman …’. Hollington is situate 17 miles from Wyleigh, in East Hoathly. Robert Lunsford of Hollington instructed: ‘To my sonne William Lunsford, £100, to be paid at the age of one and twenty years … William Bathurst of the Castle (i.e. Hastings, 20 miles from Goudhurst) shall have the bringinge of him upp … to my sonne Robert Lunsford* … reversion of my lands called Chaney … parishe of St. Mihills ( i.e. St. Michael’s parish, Lewes) after my father’s decease … to my sonne Harbert Lunsford,** my farm(s) called Harely and Filsome’.

*Robert Lunsford Jr. was the father of John Lunsford, noticed in this deed: (a) Edward Drew of Tystroffe in West Hoathly yeo. and Ann his wife (b) Samuel Creed of St Clements in Hastings, Clerk and Margaret his wife (c) John Lunsford of St Clements in Hastings, mercer and Mary his wife. (d) Richard Ellis of All Saints in Hastings and Sarah his wife (the wives all being daus. of John Taylor, late of East Grinstead gent. dec’d.).

**Harbert Lunsford had issue: (1) *Robert Lunsford, bapt. April 7, 1622 in Hollington, bur. July 14, 1698, whose son, John Lunsford, born c. 1648, m. Mary Atkins in 1678. (2) John Lunsford, who m. Sarah Avery, in 1646, dau. of Lawrence Avery: ‘Avery, Laurence, of Westfield, Sussex, March 3, 1647-8. Will (105 Pembroke) pr. July 2nd. by dau. Sarah, and her husband John Lunsford (of Hollington)’. She was entitled to a moiety of the properties bought in 1606 and 1613, presumably by descent from Margaret Swanne, her mother (Deeds of Property in Hooe and Bexhill).

*‘Robert Lunsford of Hollington leaves to his wife Mary, and son, John Lunsford, ‘Freeholds and Coppyhold’; his Will pr. July 30, 1698. In her will of September 12, 1695, Sarah (Avery) Lunsford of Hollington, widow, bequeathed her messuage and lands in Hooe to her ‘son Robert for life with remainder to his daughters Sarah, Mary and Ann, subject to an annuity of £5’.

The said Mary Atkins was the dau. of John Atkins junr., ‘To the poor of Brightling (where Micaiah Perry and Thomas Lane held property), 20s. To three daughters, Mary the wife of John Lunsford (m. February 22, 1678; surety  J. Jones of Crowhurst and St. Michael’s’), Ann Adkin (sic) and Elizabeth Adkin, all the testator’s share of the … lands and premises in Crowhurst, co. Sussex, which were devised to him by John Marten of Crowhurst, gent., his father-in-law. To son John Adkin … lands … in Brightling and Battell. To sons Thomas Atkin (sic) and Edward Atkin … lands &c. in Eastgrinsted … settled upon testator by Thomas Dyne of Eastgrinsted, gent., his grandfather’.

This connection to the Averys is likey repeated here: ‘Richard Jordan, Jr. 260 a Johnchecokuck Swamp … being part of Mr. (Bartholomew) Owen’s dividend … for transp. of six persons Mary Hoskins, Jon. Avery, Jon. Cooke, Geo. Miller, Tho. Bernard (Virginia Patent B. 7, p. 369).

B. T. Shannon states – ‘Christopher Lewis bequested to Katherine, dau. of Bartholomew Owen, and to the orphan of the Thomas Harris who d. 1668. Katherine Owen’s brothers, William and Thomas Owen, migrated to Goochland about the same time as Michael Holland and others. Later, William Owen* and some of his circle moved to a part of Halifax that became Pittsylvania. Among them were William Atkins/Atkinson, who married Elizabeth Parker, whose son William Atkinson married William Owen’s daughter, Lydia. Another son of William Owen was Lansford Owen. Elizabeth Cartwright, da. of Robert Cartwright, d. 1676 was under the guardianship of Hezekiah Bunnill, who, on Nov. 4, 1679, presented Walter Flood and Richard Avery (d. December 7, 1685, Surry), as securities for her estate (O.B. 1671-90, p. 273). Elizabeth m. William Rogers, who seems to have m. (1) a dau of Bartholomew Owen. Wm. Rogers lived in the household of widow Joanna Owen, recorded as titheables in 1678; and he was associated with Joshua Proctor, a known son-in-law of Bartholomew Owen. At the same court in which William Rogers receipted for the property of his second wife, Elizabeth Cartwright, Sept. 7, 1686, Robert Owen chose Roger Potter as his guardian instead of William Rogers’ (O.B. 1671-90, p. 528).

William Owen’s wife was very likely a daughter of John Lunsford and Mary Atkin, aforementioned.

This account, although only remotely substantive because of its generality; its lack of consulting the most basic of records, is at least consistent with the nature of kinship associations of this time, and, thus, is likely to be substantially true.

The true importance of the families under consideration is not their genealogical record, but one of the nature of the forces which shaped it – kinship associations overlaid by religious and political ones.

Genealogy of this time is nothing much more than a record of the poltics of survival couched in different terms; a universal constant. It was not always the case that people believed the religious and political doctrines they espoused, but if survival and advancement depended on being ‘The Vicar of Bray’, then so it was.
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COUNCIL/COUNSELL OF VIRGINIA

The Hodges and Lancasters were wealthy and armigerous families, and the aim of their tenants was an intermarriage with them. A route to this would be to intermarry with such as the Counsells. The Harris family were yeomen tenants of the Hodges, in Wedmore, and the Lancasters (and/or Hodges), in nearby Cheddar. They would have been cattle farmers, who lived in a swampy, misty place. The Counsells were tenants of the Hodges. In the chancel of St Mary, Wedmore, against the north wall is a small stone monument commemorating George Hodges, Esq. On a grave stone in the nave floor: ‘To the pious memory of William Counsel, of East-Stoughton in the parish of Wedmore, who died June 4, 1671’. It was a mark of some status to be buried within the church.

COUNCIL. The standard parish register entry reads Cowncell, and in the majority of deeds, Counsell.
1.
1.1. William Counsell.
1.1.1. George Counsell, bapt. 15 July 1584, m. 2 July 1607, Margery Wyke. The relationship betw. Margery Wyke and Edward Wiche, who m. Sara Chapman, 9 Feb. 1640, in Bridgwater (St Mary), 16 mls fr. Wedmore, can not be known. As I have noted elsewhere, Edward Wiche was the ancestor of Abigail Wyche, who m. George Brewer (4 March 1734), son of George Brewer and Sarah Lanier, half-sister of Sampson Lanier Sr., who m. Elizabeth Washington; their son, Thomas Lanier, m. Anne Maclin, dau. of William Maclin Sr. and Katherine Brewer.
1.2. John Cownsell, m. (1) Margaret Browninge, 28 April 1567; (2) Joan Thurston, 13 Aug. 1573, relict of Thomas Hayne, m. 24 May 1565.
1.2.1. Richard Cownsell, bapt. 4 Apr. 1568 (of Westham, parish of Wedmore). PROB 11/104/18, 4 May 1604.
1.2.2. John Counsell, bapt. 25 Dec. 1569. Francis & Blanche James to John Counsell, lease. Somerset Heritage Centre (S.H.C.), ref. DD\GB/83/1. 1613.
1.2.2.1. Alice Cownsell, bapt. 18 Feb. 1588, m. Thomas Huchens, 14 Oct. 1605.
1.3.1. John Cownsell, bapt. 28 Jan. 1599.
1.3.2. Richard Cownsell, bapt. Feb. 2. 1601.
1.3.3. William Cownsell, bapt. 28 Jan. 1604. (Westham). Counsell v Tibbett. Plaintiffs: Matilda Counsell widow and Elizabeth Norvell spinster. Defendants: Benjamin Tibbett, Magdalen Tibbett his wife and John Hellier. Subject: property in Barrow, Somerset, nr. Wedmore. (Nat. Arch. (N.A.) ref. C 6/110/17. 1650).

1.4. John Cownsell, bapt. 1573.
1.4.1. John Cownsell, bapt 28 Nov. 1601, ‘f. Joannis Counsell’, m. Mary Coomer, 26 Nov 1631; the sister of Agnes Coomer, who m. John Harris in the adj. parish of Cheddar, 4. Feb. 1635. Their granddau. m. a member of the Hix family, stewards of the Lancasters. The vastly intertwined nature of family associations is evidenced through the Coomers. Mary and Agnes Coomer were daughters of a John Coomer, sisters of John Coomer, and aunt of his issue: John Coomer (father of another John), William Coomer Sr., Thomas Coomer, and Mary Coomer, who m. John Gardner, 24 Oct. 1664, in Cheddar; br. of Joel Gardner, father of Jane Gardner, who m. James Counsell, likely br. of Hodges Counsell, 12 Jun. 1682, in Cheddar. (See Presentments of churchwardens, etc. Cheddar (Peculiar, etc.). 1662-1701. Marriage Bond: James Counsell of Burrington, husbandman, and Jane Gardner, daughter of Joel Gardner of Cheddar. (S.H.C./ DD\SAS/C795/PR/150).

Jane Gardner was the sister of Elizabeth Gardner, who m. George Tibbits, May 1678, in Cheddar, sister of Hester Tibbits, who m. Thomas Harris, 24 Apr. 1679, in Cheddar; this Thomas I presume to be a son of the aforesaid John Harris and Mary Coomer. The Tibbets were not insubstantial; George Tibbits Jr. leased land from Thomas and Mary Tillam (the relict of William Rose), 28 Oct. 1728 (S.H.C./DD\WCL/33(a). George Tibbits Sr. was the br. of Henry and John, who leased the same land from Mary Rose, da. of John Lancaster, lord of the manor (S.H.C./DD\WCL/20). William and Mary Rose also leased land to John Coomer, the third so mentioned above, 15 Dec. 1698 (S.H.C./DD\WCL/13a). The Tibbit brs. were the sons of John Tibbit, who was admitted to the manor of Cheddar, 14 Nov. 1671, at the manorial court of Edward Lancaster, father of John, receiving ‘for their lives in survivorship of the cottage of Old Auster and stable and orchard adjourning in Dolebridge Street in Cheddar’. (S.H.C./DD\WCL/5). The da. of Mary Lancaster/Rose/Tillam, Mary Tillam, leased to ‘George Marshall of Chedder yeoman … a pasture commonly called Violetts containing 3 acres within the mannor and parish of Cheddar … ‘heretofore in the tenure of Thomas Comer deceased’. (S.H.C./DD\WCL/37). Mary Tillam also leased to William Counsell, yeoman (probable nephew of Hodges Counsell, ‘all that ½-acre of Arrable land lying at a place called Innock’, 20 Jan. 1720. (S.H.C./DD\WCL/25). The Gardners were intermarried with the Marshalls, Elizabeth Gardner m. William Marshall, 21 Dec 1696.

Will of John Comer of Cheddar, yeoman. 24 Jan 1716. Bequeathing (a) to his son, John Comer, all that tenement late Adams, all his ground at Cowhams in Chedder, 2 acres of pasture, late Roses, lying at Holwell in Chedder; (b) to his daughter, Sarah Comer, all his ground at Locking and £150 to be paid to her within half-a-year of his decease; (c) to his daughter, Anne Comer, all his ground at Loxton, and £150 to be paid with half-a-year of his decease on her delivering up to her brothers a Bond she has and forgiving what interest there may be due on it; (d) to his son, James Comer, all his Leaseholds, i.e. late Jefferys of Chesbrook and 2 acres of arrable ground in the Common feild late Roses in Cheddar; and all the rest of his mortgages, goods and chattles not before mentioned and given, he gives to his sons James and John Comer equally between them. Probate granted 20 Oct. 1722. (S.H.C./DD\WCL/23a).

I have laboured these details so as to evidence the kinship nature of the associations of Virginia colonists, who were as much subject to events in England as those in England were subject to events in Virginia. A ‘good’ marriage in one place reverberated to the other. Colonists and English kin were seperated by an ocean; only a slowing of cause and effect. Many colonists intended to return to England, having made their fortune, migration being a temporary expedient. It is such considerations, surely, that are pertinent to understanding colonisation as a social enterprise, as a part of a method of promoting the interests of families through their kinship connections; as part of the method of genealogical enquiry.

1.4.2. Johanna Cownsell, bapt. 28 Nov. 1601 (twin), m. (1) Philip Lawrence, 20 Aug. 1618, (2) John Chapman, 26 April 1624.
1.4.2. Edward Cownsell, bapt. 6 June 1609.
1.4.3. William Cownsell, bapt. 5 Aug. 1610, m. Mary Hayne.
1.4.4. Richard Cownsell, bapt. 3 Sept. 1613 (Blackford vill. par. Wedmore), m. (1) Joan Taylor, 12 Aug. 1640, (2) Elizabeth Hix, 12 Aug. 1647, dau. of William Hix and Grace Morton, m. 23 Jan. 1625, and niece of Margaret Hix, who m. Simon Day, 14 Jan. 1632. Lease: Margery Hodges of Heathhouse, Wedmore, widow, to Richard Counsell of Wedmore, husbandman and Joan his wife. Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre. ref. 2667/1/36/2. 1648. Sale: 15a. land occ. by Thos. Brooke, 2a. land occ. by Hy.Symes,* mess. and ten. and 40a. land occ. by Rich. Council, all in Wedmore, sold by co-heirs of Geo. Hodges to Wm. Prowse of Compton Bishop. Somerset Heritage Centre, ref. DD\FD/10. 1665. *Uncle of Richard Symes, father of Adam Symes (See N&Q, 1890), father of George Sims, of Brunswick Co.; d. Sept. 1763; who bought land from his br. John Sims, on 5 Nov. 1747,father of Adam Sims, who m. Elizabeth Walton, da. of George Walton of Brunswick Co., and who was, thus, the br.-in-law of Nathan Harris, grandson of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and br. of West Harris.
1.4.4.1. Hodges Council, the very likely son of Richard Council, by either his first or second wife. Richard Counsell was the br.-in-law of Susan Lancaster, and Hodges Counsell may have received his Christian name after her husband, William Hodges, a member of the very influential Hodges family, squires of Wedmore, who was probably his Godfather.

Hodges Council, d. bef. 9 Aug. 1699, was named as the husband of Lucy Hardy in the Will of John Hardy, who had married Alice Bennett (B. 2, p. 419); of the Bennett family of Wivelscombe, Somerset, intermarried with the Harris family of Wedmore/Cheddar. It may be of interest to record that Hodges Council, as follows, was a probable br. of 1. Joseph Council, who married into the same Thatcher family as did the Harris: James Thatcher of Barrington, yeoman, to Joseph Counsell of Cocklake in parish of Wedmore, husbandman: in cons of marriage shortly to be solemnized between Counsell and Thatcher’s daughter Joane: Signed: Joseph Counsell. Seal: merchants. Bristol Record Office, ref. 21789/5. 18 May 1681. 2. William Counsell. Lease: By William Rose of Cheddar and Mary his wife one of the daughters and coheirs of John Lancaster of Milverton Esqr. deceased to Samuel Leonard of Wedmore … ½-acre in Stoneshill the land of William Counsell on the East side … the land of Edward Counsell in the West side … All which … are parcell of the Manor of Cheddar Fitzwaters. Somerset Heritage Centre, ref. 12. 10 May 1698. 3. Edward Counsell. 4. James Counsell, as given.

1.4.4.1.1. Hodges Council, inherited land on Blackwater. IOW, B 10, p. 205: John Council of Isle of Wight County and Province of Virginia sold to James Council of said county and his heirs forever, “my plantation whereon I now dwell only excepting my life in plantation” on Blackwater (River) 100 acres more or less joining Benjamin Darden and Samuel Vaughn. Part of “Patien” granted Hodges Council (the 2d) and by his will to his son John Councill and now by said John Councill to his son James Councill, to him & his heirs forever to have & hold. Sig. John Council. Wit. John Benteen, Nathan Council. Rec. 2 May 1756. Richard Worrell and wife Patience to James Kitching, dated 8 Apr. 1756, 174 acres on the south side of the Blackwater Swamp adj. William Harris, Thomas Gray, and John Barnes (part of a patent to Lewis Bryan for 345 acres who sold to Robert Tayler and was sold to sd. Richard), S: Richard Worrell and Patience Worrell. W: Joseph Denson, John Johnson, and Nathan Council. (Southampton Co., B. 2, 1753-1760, p. 97). William Harris to Nathan Council of IOW Co., dated 8 Apr. 1756, 100 acres adj. Bridgman Joyner Jr. S: William Harris, W: Jesse Jones, Sarah King, and James Kitchen. (ibid. pp. 97-98).
Joseph Willis of Halifax to Jos. Daniel of same, 6 Sep. 1777, £8, 30a on E sd Rockey Sw, adj. Thomas Wright. wit Isham Rosser, Nathan council. Rec. Nov. 1778.
1.4.4.1.2. John Council, inherited from his father ‘the land I bought of Robert Lawrence’; likely the son of Philip Lawrence, who m. Joan Council, 20 Aug. 1618, Wedmore, the probable great- aunt of Hodges Council Sr. John Council d. bef. 1747, m. Josie Willis. John Council of Newport Parish to John Mackall of the same, 300 acres in Newport Parish (being land John Hardy of the lower parish willed to his dau. Lucy Council, who was the mother of the said John Council), on the southeast side of John Fulgram’s Swamp, adjoining William Westray and William Joyner. Wit. William Greene, Henry Pitt and John Council. Rec. 26 Feb. 1710.
1.4.4.1.3. Christian Council, m. Edward Bryan. (ibid. p. 409).
1.4.4.1.4. Hardy Council, d. 1750, m. Susannah Pope. Executor: son, Charles; Witnesses: Robert Johnson, Hardy Lawrence, and Jacob Dickinson. Hardy Council, Gent. to Richard Wooten and wife, Lucy Wooten, and their son, William Wooten, as consideation of a law suit over trepass, 500 acres on Beaver Dam Swamp. Wit: Barnaby Kearney, Christopher Reynolds, Hardy Council, John Pitt. (B. 4, p. 98. Rec. 22 Mar. 1730).
1.4.4.1.4.1. Charles Council.
1.4.4.1.4.2. Mary m. Phillip Brantley.
1.4.4.1.4.3. Ann, m. Robert Lawrence.
1.4.4.1.4.4. Martha m. William Fowler.
1.4.4.1.4.5. Christian, m. William Daughtrey.
1.4.4.1.5. Lucy (Council) Wooten.
1.4.4.1.6. Robert Council, d. 1 June 1730, IOW, m. Katherine Johnson. James Harris of Halifax Co. (see as follows), m. Elizabeth Norfleet, whose grandfather held land adj. Robert Council and Thomas Turner.

The aforementioned John Harris, husband of Agnes Coomer, sister of Mary Coomer, the likely aunt of Hodges Council, was the uncle of:

1. Thomas Harris.
1.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, Cheddar, ‘son of Thomas’, probably he who d. in 1688, in Virginia. Thomas Harris: Leg.-son Edward; son John; son Thomas; son Robert; daughter Jane Jones; daughter Ann; son Robert to live with John Fulgham; son George with John Turner; son Martin with his brother; son William with Bridgman Joyner; pr. 9 Oct. 1688.
1.1.1. Robert Harris, m. Anne Fulgham, da. of Michael Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset. Susannah Fulgham, Anne’s sister, m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Council and Lucy Hardy. Hardy Council was the br. of Hodges Council Jr., who m. Rebecca Pope.
1.1.2. Edward Harris, Will pr. 25 March 1734.
1.1.2.1. James Harris, d. 1749, br.-in-law of Matthew Joyner.
1.1.2.1.1. James Harris. (Thomas Norfleet (m. Ruth Blount) bought adjoining land from Robert Council (NC. Edg. Co. D.B. 1., p. 204), and was mentioned as a neighbour of Robert Council and Thomas Turner (J. Bryan Grimes, Abstracts of North Carolina Wills, p. 17). His son was Marmaduke Norfleet, father of Elizabeth Norfleet, who m. James Harris in Halifax Co, NC., son of: James Harris. 10 Jan. 1749. Feb. Court, 1749. Sons: James (‘my plantation’), Eli. Wife and Executrix: Cheary (sister of Mathew Joyner*). Executor: Mathew Joyner. Witnesses: Wm. Skinner, John Blount, John Crumpton. (ibid, p. 153). Henry Turner: Jan. 20, 1748. Feb. Court, 1748: Executor: Matthew Joyner. Witnesses: Matthew Joyner, James Harris, Marmaduke Norfleet. (ibid. p. 382). *Son of Thomas Joyner, Will dated 13 April 1740; the son of Thomas Joyner (br. of Bridgeman Joyner, the guardian of an orphan of Thomas Harris, d. 1688).
1.1.2.1.1.1. James Harris m. 1. Temperance Williams: Martha Joyner witnessed the will of Temperance Williams, wife of James.
1.1.3. George Harris.
1.1.3.1. William Harris. William Harris and wife Charity of Halifax County, North Carolina to John Council, dated 11 Oct, 1764, 1. 100 acres on the north side of Black Creek adj. Capt. Joseph Godwins old line and Gum Branch (patent to Barnaby McInnie who sold it to George Harris who gave it to his son William, 2. 113 acres adj. Long Branch ; part of patent to Joseph Godwin on 25 Jul. 1746 who sold to John Bowin who sold to sd. William). S: William Harris and Charity Harris. W: Henry Pope, Simon Harris, and William Kitchen. Halifax County, vol. 1, 1758-1774, pp. 304-306. I William Harris … lend to my daughter Prudence Pope who is now living in Virginia my negroe girl slave named Jeney during her natural life and after her death she & her increase to be equally divided amongst the rest of my children. May Court 1772. (ibid. p. 317). Prudence (Harris) Pope was the sister-in-law of John Pope: I Henery Pope … to my loving wife Tabitha Pope one Negroe named Joe and all my household furniture, all my livestock and all my debts due to me … to my oldest son Burrel Pope one plantation … 209 acres & also one negroe Girl named Patt … my younger sons Willis, John, Henry Austin and Wiley Pope all ye rest of my lands & negroes not bequeathed before. April Court 1764. (ibid. p. 144). Paul Heinegg (‘Free African Americans’, vol i., p. 554), shows that ‘Edward Gowen in Virginia, taxable in 1761 in his father’s household in the list of Robert Harris. In 1767 he was head of his own household, one Black male, in John Pope’s list. It might seem reasonable to suggest that Robert Harris was a son of William Harris, br. of Simon, and one of ‘the rest of my children’.
1.1.3.1.1. Simon Harris. William Harris to son Simon Harris, dated 4 Apr. 1764, Sells slave, S: William Harris, W: Henry Pope, Hardy Pope, and Salathel Lewis (ibid., p. 331). To Salathel Lewis, dated 10 Oct. 1764, 74 acres adj. Francis Denson and Boone Branch (patent to John Denson the elder who sold to John Sikes and by Joshua his son sold to Hodges Council). S: John Council (grandson of Hodges Council Jr.) and Selah (Worrel) Council, W: Henry Pope, William Joyner, William Joyner, and Daniel Doyle. (ibid., pp. 324-325).
1.1.3.1.1. Robert Harris.

In a very real sense, the continuation of associations between English families in Virginia brought stability, and continued to strengthen bonds in England, which was of no little importance within the squirearchy/tenant system. The bonds between these families was likely to have been closer than can be gleaned; hidden in a Somerset marsh fog.

copyright m stanhope 2016

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VIRGINIA COLONISATION AND BARRIERS OF LANGUAGE

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James Jennings (Observations on some of the dialects in the west of England, 1827) made the point that the spoken English of Chaucer treated syllables in the same way as occured in the Somerset dialect north east of the River Parret, which made “two syllables of words which are monosyllables in our polished dialect. And thus the words air, both, fair, fire, stairs, sure, &c. become ayer, booath, feyer, vier, stayers, shower, &c. And thus, 1 have no doubt, they were formerly very generally pronounced, as Chaucer gives many of them as dissyllables”.

He also drew other parallels: “There is also as strong a tendency to pleonasm in some instances, as to contraction and elision in others. Thus we have alost for lost, agone for gone, abought for bought, abrought for brought, &c. Exemplifications of these prefixes will be found in abundance in Chaucer; but he very often uses the y instead of a, as ylost”.

He defended this Somerset dialect agaist charges of inferiority: “Notwithstanding there is an impression very generally entertained, I believe, that this dialect of the west is a very rough and inharmonious one; except in the frequent and unpleasant use of Z for S and V for F, I do not think it will be found so deficient in agreeable sounds as it has been commonly supposed”.

Importantly, he was a student of pronounciation, and “conveyed in letters the nearest to the sound of the words” several poems written in this dialect. He explained his method: “Where I have used the circumflex over the letter a it is to be understood that the sound of the letter is to be exactly like the a in father. I might have adopted the same plan with respect to the vowel o, for the long sound of it, as heard in the words no, gold, &c.; which is, for the most part, like aw in the word awful, but, as it is very easy to convey this sound by an additional letter, I have preferred the latter mode”.

That listening was central to his methodology is evidenced in his comments about book-driven lexicography: “Too many of our lexicographers have fallen, in compiling a dictionary from a living language. They have depended too much upon books, and too little upon the use and accepted meaning of words as they are current in the every-day transactions of life. Hence it sometimes happens, that the meaning in a dictionary is at variance with the use of the word in society; and it has happened, too, that many words are current in society, which no lexicographer has arrested, but which are nevertheless useful words. Books are not, in fact, the only sources whence information of this kind should be derived”. He further commented: conjectural etymologies are, in too many instances, calculated to mislead”.

He makes a point that can be expanded: “It is remarkable that few, if any, dictionaries of our language are to be obtained which were published from the invention of the art of printing in the middle of the fifteenth century and during the whole of the sixteenth, a period of about one hundred and fifty years. These dictionaries would, no doubt, throw considerable light on our early literature and provincial words. It is true some scarce copies of such works are to be found, I understand, in the cabinets of the curious, but they are not accessible to the general reader”.

Dictionaries, plays, and Classical literature were freely available to the university educated, “which were published from the invention of the art of printing in the middle of the fifteenth century and during the whole of the sixteenth”. The salient point being that such publications as replications aided the standardisation of Elizabethan English among the social/intellectual elite.

When historians refer to the English people of this time as an homogenous entity, united in a common opposition to Spain, or enjoying the plays of Shakespeare, they but refer to a ruling elite. The dispossed Catholic half of the country prayed for a Spanish invasion; the vast majority of people would not have understood much spoken by Queen Elizabeth (rallying a homogenous English army!), or, for that matter, anything spoken in a play of Shakespeare; for the general public did not have access to or understanding of the written word, and were thus excluded from the process of the harmonisation of the English language. They lived in idiosyncratic and remote islands of dialect, and, when migrating to London, tended to live in single-dialect communities, much the same as in modern cities.

Idiosincracy was a key key element in distinguishing the English of the elite from that of the masses, for not only were the sounds of various English dialects almost alien to each other, these dialects also contained words which were not shared: Dialects differed in substance as well as form, with area-specific words reflecting ancient colonisations by different ethnic groups.

It is one thing in the luxury of time to reflect on the common origin of words, and another to suppose in the instance of their delivery that they would be understood by all.

Mr. Jennings entreats: “To a person, therefore, acquainted with this dialect, who has leisure, and who should feel disposed to go through a course of study amongst our old writers, and who has an opportunity of examining our old MSS., an abundant harvest offers, from which an amusing book might be made, illustrative of many of our provincial words and of our ancient manners. But such leisure, whatever may be my disposition, does not fall to my share; the compilation of such a work must be left to some more fortunate individual than myself. I must be contented with having thus far elucidated the language of my native county”.

He provides a valuable glossary of words (extracts of which are given), which can be compared and contrasted with Chaucer, and those of other regional dialects:

GLOSSARY OF WORDS COMMONLY USED IN THE COUNTY OF SOMERSET; BUT WHICH ARE NOT ACCEPTED AS LEGITIMATE WORDS OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE;OR WORDS WHICH, ALTHOUGH ONCE USED GENERALLY, ABE NOW BECOME PROVINCIAL.

A. adv. Yes. A is also frequently used instead of the pronoun he: as a zed a’d do it; he said he’d do it.
Abrood’. adv. When a hen is sitting on her eggs she is said to be abrood.
Agoo’. I Ago; agoo, Chaucer; from the verb to goo, i. e. to go; he is up and agoo; he is up and gone.
Aller. s. The alder tree.
Anby’. adv. Some time hence; in the evening.
Apast’. part. and prep. Past; apast, Chaucer.
To Ar’gufy. v. n. To hold an argument; to argue.
Assu’e. adj. When a cow is let up in order that she may calve, she is said to be assue — having no milk.

To Ballirag. v. a. To abuse with foul words; to scold.
To Bane. v. a. To afflict with a mortal disease: applied to sheep.
Barrow-pig. s. A gelt pig.
Be’edy. s. A chick.
Befbr’n. prep. Before.
Begrum’pled. part. Soured; offended.
To Belg. v. n. To cry aloud; to bellow.
To Belsh. v. a. To cut off dung, &c. from the tails of sheep.
To Bethink’. v. a. To grudge.
Bettermost. adj. The best of the better; not quite amounting to the best.
To Biv’er. v. n. To quiver; to shake.
Blanker. s. A spark of fire.
Bleachy. adj. Brackish; saltish: applied to water.
Booath. pron. Both. “Boo’ath o’ ye;” both of you.
Brock. s. An irregular piece of peat dried for fuel.
Bullen, adj. Wanting the bull.
To Bunt. v. a. To separate flour from the bran.
Bur’cot. s. A load.
Buss. s. half-grown calf.

Chaity. adj. Careful; nice; delicate.
To Cham. v. a. To chew.
Chamer. s. A chamber,
Change. s. A shift; the garment worn by females.
Chit’terlins. s. pi. The frills around the bosom of a shirt.
Choor. A job; any dirty household work.
To Claps. v. a. To clasp.
Clavy. s. A mantel-piece.
Clinker-bell. s. An icicle.
Clint. v. a. To clench; to finish; to complete.
Clear-and-sheer. adv. Completely; totally.
Cock-lawt. A garret; cock-loft.
Cock-and-Mwile. s. A jail.
Colley. s. A blackbird.
Cow-baby. s. A coward; a timid person.
Creem. s. Sudden shivering.
Croom. A crumb; a small bit.
Crow’sty. adj. Crusty, snappish, surly.
Cutty. adj. Small; diminutive.

To Daver. v. n. To fade; to fall down; to droop.
Dibs. pl. Money.
To Dout. v. a. To extinguish; to put out.
To Downarg. v. a. To contradict; to contend with.
Drang. s. A narrow path. To Drash. v. a. To thresh.
To Drean. v. n. To drawl in reading or speaking. (A feature of this Somerset dialect).
Drode. part. Thrown.
To Drool. v. n. To drivel.
Drove. s. A road leading to fields, and sometimes from one village to another.
To Druck. v. a. To thrust down; to cram.
Drubbin. s. A beating.
To Dud’der. v. a. To deafen with noise; to render the head confused.
Duds. s. Dirty cloaths.

Emmet-batch, s. An ant-hill.
En. pron. Him; a zid en; he saw him.
Few. adj. More commonly pronounced veo.
Fil’try. s. Filth; nastiness; rubbish.
Flap-jack. A fried cake made of batter, apples, &c.; a fritter.
To Frump, v. a. To trump up.
To Fur. v. a. To throw.
Fur’cum. s. The bottom; the whole.

To G’auf. v. n. To go off.
To G’ auver. v. n. To go over.
To G’ in. v. n. To go in.
To G’ on. v.n. To go on.
To G’ out. v. n. To go out.
To G’ under. v. n.. To go under.
To G’ up. v. n. To go up.
Ginnin. Beginning.
G’lore. adv. In plenty.
Graint’ed. adj. Fixed in the grain; difficult to be removed.
Grammer. s. Grandmother.
Grithle. s. A young apple-tree raised from seed.
To Gud’dle. v. n. To drink much and greedily.

To Hain. v. a. To exclude cattle from a field in order that the grass may grow, so that it may be mowed.
Ham. s. A pasture generally rich, and also unsheltered.
Hard. adj. Full grown. Hard people, adults.
To Have. v. n. To behave.
Hay’ty-tayty. Interj. What’s here!
Heft. s. Weight.
To Hell. v. a. To pour. To hell in, to pour in;
Herence, adv. From this place; hence.
Hereright, adv. Directly; in this place.
Het, pron. It.
Het o’nt, it will not.
To Hick. v. n. To hop on one leg.
To Hike off. v. n. To go away; to go off.
Hollardy-day. Holy-rood day; the third of May.
Huck’muck. s. A strainer placed before the faucet in the mashing-tub.
Hum’drum. s. A small low three-wheeled cart, drawn usually by one horse; used occasionally in agriculture.

To Jee. v. n. To go on well together.
Jod. s. The letter J.

Keffel. s. A bad and worn out horse.
To Kern. v. n. To turn from blossom to fruit.
Kexies. As dry. as a kexy is a common simile.
Knot’tlins. s. pi. The guts of a pig or calf prepared for food by being tied in knots and afterwards boiled.

Lai’ter. s. The thing laid; the whole quantity of eggs which a hen lays successively.
Lam’iger. adj. Lame; crippled; laid up.
Larks-leers. s. pi. Arable land not in use; such is much frequented by larks; any land which is poor and bare of grass.
Lat’itat. s. A noise; a scolding.
Leathern-mouse. A bat.
Leer. adj. Empty.
Leer. s. The flank.
Lighting-stock. s. A horse-block; a graduated place of wood or stone, made to ascend and descend from a horse.
To Line. v. n. To lean; to incline towards or against something.

Lin’ny. An open shed, attached to bams, outhouses, &c.
Lock. s. A small quantity; as a lock of hay, a lock of straw.
Lockyzee! interj. Look, behold! Look you, see.
Lug. s. A heavy pole; a pole, a long rod.

Mang-hangle. adj. Mixed in a wild and confused manner.
To Meech. v. n. To play truant; to absent from school.
Messin. The act of serving cattle with hay.
Min. A low word, implying contempt, addressed to the person to whom we speak, instead of Sir. I’ll do it, min.
Mom’met. s. A scarecrow; something dressed.
To Moot. v. a. To root up.

Nan. interjec. Used in reply, in conversation or address, the same as Sir, in polite company, when you do not understand.
Nap. s. A small rising; a hillock.
Nawl-cut. s. A piece cut out at the navel: a term used by butchers.
Nestle Tripe. s. The weakest and poorest bird in the nest; applied, also, to the last-born, and usually the weakest child of a family;any young, weak, and puny child, or bird.
Nora’tion. Rumour; clamour.
Nor’thering. adj. Wild, incoherent, foolish.
Not-sheep. s. A sheep without horns.
Num’met. A short meal between breakfast and dinner
Nuncle. s. An uncle.
To Nuncle. v. a. To cheat.
Nuth’er. adv. Neither.

To Onlight. v. n. To alight; to get off a horse.
Ont. Will not. This expression is used in almost all the persons, as ont, he ont, we ont.
Oten. adv. Often.
Ourn. pron. Ours.
To Overget. v. a. To overtake.
To Overlook. v. a. To bewitch.
Overs. s. pi. The perpendicular edge, usually covered with grass, on the sides of salt-water rivers, is called overs.
Parfitly. adv. Perfectly.
Par’rick. s. A paddock.
To Payze. v. a. To force, or raise up, with a lever.
To Peach. v. a. To inform against; to impeach.
Peel. s. A pillow, or bolster.
To Peer. v. n. To appear.
Pigs-looze. s. A pigsty.
Pill-coal. v. A kind of peat, dug most commonly out of rivers: peat obtained at a great depth, beneath a stratum of clay.
To Pitch. v. a. To lay unhewn and unshaped stones together, so as to make a road or way.
To Pixy. crop is taken in; to glean, applied to an orchard only.
Pla’zen. s. pi. Places.
Plough. The cattle or horses used for ploughing; also a waggon and horses, or waggon and oxen.
To Pray. v. a. To drive all the cattle into one herd in a moor; to pray the moor, to search for lost cattle.
Pud. s. The hand; the fist.
Pulk. s. A small, shallow-place, containing water.
Put. s. A two-wheeled cart used in husbandry, and so constructed as to be turned up at the axle to discharge the load.
Pux’ie. s. A place on which you cannot tread without danger of sinking into it: applied most commonly to places in roads or fields where springs break out.
Pwint. s. Point.
Pwine-end. The sharp-pointed end of a house.

To Quar. v. a. To raise stones from a quarry.
Quar-man. A man who works in a quarry.
Quine. s. Coin, money.
To Quine. v. a. To coin.
Quine. A corner.

Rames. s. pl. The dead stalks of potatoes.
Ram’ping. part. Distracted, obstreperous: ramping mad, outrageously mad.
Raught. part.
To Rawn. v. a. To devour greedily.
Re’balling. s. The catching of eels with earthworms attached to a ball of lead, suspended by a string from a pole.
Remlet. s. A remnant.
Rev’el. s. A wake.
Rud’derish. adj. Hasty, rude, without care.
Rum’pus. s. A great noise.

The sound of S is very often converted into the sound of Z.

Sand-tot. A sandhill.
To Sar. v. a. To serve.
Seed-lip. s. A vessel of a particular construction in which the sower carries the seed.
Sel’times. adv. Not often; seldom.
Shatt’n. Shalt not.
Shil’lith. A shilling’s worth.
Shord. A sherd; a gap in a hedge. A stop.
To Shroud; to cut off wood from trees generally.
To Sim. v. n. To seem, to appear. This verb is used with almost all the persons.
To Skag. To give an accidental blow, so as to tear either the cloaths or the flesh; to wound slightly.
To Skeer. v. a. To mow lightly over: applied to pastures which have been summer-eaten, never to meadows.
Skeer’ings. s. pl. Hay made from pasture land.
Skent’in. adj. When cattle, although well fed, do not become fat, they are called skentin.
Skiff-handed. adj. Left-handed, awkward. Chaucer, Second Merchant’s Tale. Skram-handed.
Slait. An accustomed run for sheep; hence the place to which a person is accustomed.
Slipper-slopper. adj. Having shoes or slippers down at the heel; loose.
To Slitter. v. n. To slide.
To Slock. v. a. To obtain clandestinely.
To Slock’ster. v. a. To waste.
Slom’aking. adj. Untidy; slatternly: applied to females.
Snead. s. The crooked handle of a mowing scythe.
Snock. s. A knock; a smart blow.
Snowl. s. The head.
Squot. A bruise, by some blow or compression; a squeeze.
Stake-Hang. s. Sometimes called only a hang. A kind of circular hedge made of stakes, forced into the sea-shore, and standing about 6 feet above it, for the purpose of catching salmon, and other fish.
Stang. A long pole.
Stefinin. A ford made with stones at the bottom of a river.
Stitch. s. Ten sheaves of corn set up on end in the field after it is cut; a shock of corn.
To Stive. v. a. To keep close and warm.
To Stiv’er. v. n. To stand up in a wild manner like hair; to tremble.
Stomachy. adj. Obstinate, proud; haughty.
Su’ent. adj. Even, smooth, plain.
To Sulsh. v. a. To soil; to dirty.
Sweetortin. Courtship.

Ta’e’ty. A potatoe.
To Tang. v. a. To tie.
Tee’ry. adj. Faint, weak.
Than. adv. Then.
Thauf. conj. Though, although.
The’rence. adv. From that place.
Thic. pron. That. Thilk, Chaucer.
To Tine. v. a. To shut, to close; as, tine the door; shut the door. To inclose; to tine in the moor, is to divide it into several allotments.
Tite, s. Weight. The tite of a pin, the weight of a pin.
Touse. s. A blow on some part of the head.
Towards. prep. is, in Somersetshire, invariably pronounced as a dissyllable, with the accent on the last: to-ward’s. Our polite pronunciation, tordz, is clearly a corruption.
Tut-work. Work done by the piece or contract; not work by the day.
To Twick. v. a. To twist or jerk suddenly.
Twily. adj. Restless; wearisome.

Unk’et. adj. Dreary, dismal, lonely.
To Unray’. v. a. To undress
Up’pin-stock. s. A horse-block.
Utch’y. pron. I. This word is not used in the Western or Eastern, but only in the Southern parts of the County of Somerset. It is, manifestly, a corrupt pronunciation of Ich, or Iche, pronounced as two syllables, the Anglo Saxon word for I. What shall utchy do?

I think Chaucer sometimes uses iche as a dissyllable; vide his Poems passim. Ch’am, is I am, that is, ich am; ch’ill, is I will, ich will. See Shakespeare’s King Lear, Act. IV. Scene VI. What is very remarkable, and which confirms me greatly in the opinion which I here state, upon examining the first folio edition of Shakespeare, at the London Institution, I find that ch is printed, in one instance, with a mark of elision before it thus, ‘ch, a proof that the i in iche was sometimes dropped in a common and rapid pronunciation. In short, this mark of elision ought always so to have been printed, which would, most probably, have prevented the conjectures which have been hazarded upon the origin of the meaning of such words as chud, chill, and cham. It is singular enough that Shakespeare has the ch for iche I, and Ise for I, within the distance of a few lines in the passage above alluded to, in King Lear. But, perhaps, not more singular than that in Somersetshire may, at the present time, be heard for the pronoun I, Itchy, or iche, and Ise. In the Western parts of Somersetshire, as well as in Devonshire, Ise is now used very generally for I. … which is the sound we give to frozen water, ice.

To Vang. v. a. To receive; to earn.
Vare. s. A species of weasel.
To Vare. v. n. To bring forth young: applied to pigs and some other animals.
Var’mint. s. A vermin.
Vell. s. The salted stomach of a calf used for making cheese.
Vier. s. Fire. Some of our old writers make this word two syllables: “Fy-er.”
Vin’ned. adj. Mouldy; humoursome; affected.
Vit’ty. adv. Properly, aptly.
Vollier. s. Something which follows; a follower.
Vooath. adv. Forth; out. To goo vooath, is to go out.
To Vooase. v. a. To force.

To Wam’mel. v. n. To move to and fro in an irregular and awkward manner.
Weepy, adj. Abounding with springs; moist.
Well-apaid. adj. Appeased; satisfied.
Wetshod. adj. Wet in the feet.Wev’et. A spider’s web.
Whatsomiver. pron. Whatsoever!
Wimmin-dust. Chaff.
Win’dor. s. A window.
With’er. pron. Other.
With’erguess. adj. Different.

Yalhouse. s. An ale-house.
Yarm. s. Arm.
Yarth. s. Earth.
Yel. An eel.

Z. See the observations which precede the letter S, relative to the change of that letter to Z.

Zam’zodden. Time in a low heat so as to be in part spoiled, is said to be zamzodden.
Zel. pron. Self.
Zog. s. Soft, boggy land; moist land.
Zull. s. The instrument used for ploughing land; a plough.
Zunz. adv. Since.

THE MAN OF MORK.

Awa wi’ all yer tales o’ grief
An dismal storry writin
A ma-be zumthin I ma zing
Ool be as much delightin.

Zumtime agoo, bevaur tha moors war tin’d in
lived at Mork one Jerry Nutty.

Iz vather in a little cot liv’d, auver-right tha moor
An thaw a kipt a vlock o’ geese
A war a thoughted poor.

A niver teach’d tha cris-cross-lain
Ta any of his bways
An Jerry, mangst the rest o’m did
Not much appruv his ways.

Vor Jerry zumtimes went ta church
Ta hire tha Pason preach
An thawt what pity that ta read
Izzel a cood’n teach.

Vor than, a zunday aternoon
Tha Bible, or good book
Would be companion vit vor’m all
Who choos’d therein ta look.

Bit Jerry than tha naise o’ geese
Bit little moor could hire
An daly goose-aggs ta pick up
Droo-out tha moor did tire.

A dten look’d upon tha hills
An stickle mountains roun
An wish’d izzel upon ther taps
What zights a ood be boun!

Bit what did mooast iz fancy strick
War Glassenberry Torr
A always zeed it when tha zun
Gleam’d wi’ tha mornin stor.

O’ Well’s grate church a oten hired
Iz fancy war awake
An zaw a thawt that zoon a ood
A journey to it make.

An Glassenberry’s Torr, an Thorn
The hawly blowth of which
A hired vrom one and tother too
Tha like war niver jitch!

Bit moor o’ this I need not za
Vor off went Jerry Nutty
In hiz right hon a wakin stick
An in hiz qut a tutty.

Now, lock-y-zee! in whimly dress
Trudg’d chearful Jerry on
Bit on tha moor not vur a went
A made a zudden ston.

Which wa ta goo a cood not thenk
Vor there war many a wa
A put upright iz walking stick
A vall’d ta tha zon o’ da.

Ta tha suthard than iz wa a took
Athert tha turfy moors
An zoon o’ blissom Cuzziton
A pass’d tha cottage doors.

Tha maidens o’ tha cottages
Not us’d strange vawk to zee
Com’d vooath and stood avaur tha door
Jer wonder’d what cood be.

Zum smil’d, zum whecker’d, zum o’m blish’d
“Od dang it!  Jerry zed
What do tha thenk that I be like?”
An nodded to’m iz head.

“Which is tha wa to Glassenberry?
I’ve hired tha hawly thorn
War zet there by zum hawly hons
Zoon ater Christ war born”.

“An how can you, a seely man
Jitch seely journey make?
What! dwont ye knaw that now about
It is the midst o’ June?
Tha hawly thorn at Kirsmas blaws —
You be zix months too zoon”.

“Goo whim again, yea gawky! goo!
Zaw zed a damsel vair
As dewy mornin late in Ma
An Jerry wide did stare.”

“Lord Miss!” zed he, I niver thawt
O’ Kirsmas! — while I’ve shoes
To goo back now I be zet out
Is what I sholl not choose.”

“Ih zee the Torr an hawly thorn
An Glassenberry too
An, nif you’ll put me in tha wa
I’ll gee grate thanks ta you.”

“Goo droo thic veel an up thic lane
An take tha lift hon path
Than droo Miss Crossman’s backzid strait
Ool bring ye up ta Wrath.”

Now mine, whaur you da turn again
At vanner Veal’s long yacker
Clooase whaur Jan Lide, tha cobler  lives
Who makes tha best o’ tacker.”

“You mist turn short behine tha house
An goo right droo tha shord
An than you’ll pass a zummer lodge
A builded by tha lord.”

“Tha turnpick than is jist belaw
An Cock-hill strait avaur ye.”
Za Jerry doff’d his hat an bow’d,
An thank’d to vor er storry.

Bit moor o’ this I need not za,
Vor off went Jerry Nutty;
In hiz right hon-a waktn stick
An in hiz qut a tutty.

Compare this with the “clipped” Yorkshire dialect, and ask whether those of different regions and not party to a university education had any chance of understanding each others’ words in the instance of their delivery. Apart from stark differences in pronounciation, no one outside Somerset would know what was meant by emmet-batch, etc.

COLONIAL SETTLERS OF VIRGINIA LIVED IN COMMUNITIES OF THE KINSHIP OF THE LIKE-TONGUED. (Utch’y zay).

“ON ILKLA MOOAR BAHT ‘AT”.

Wheear ‘ast tha bin sin’ ah saw thee, ah saw thee?
On Ilkla Mooar baht ‘at
Wheear ‘ast tha bin sin’ ah saw thee, ah saw thee?
Wheear ‘ast tha bin sin’ ah saw thee?
On Ilkla Mooar baht ‘at
On Ilkla Mooar baht ‘at
On Ilkla Mooar baht ‘at
Tha’s been a cooartin’ Mary Jane
Tha’s bahn’ to catch thy deeath o’ cowd
Then us’ll ha’ to bury thee
Then t’worms’ll come an’ eyt thee up
Then t’ducks’ll come an’ eyt up t’worms
Then us’ll go an’ eyt up t’ducks
Then us’ll all ha’ etten thee
That’s wheear we get us ooan back

Where have you been since I saw you, I saw you?
On Ilkley Moor without a hat
Where have you been since I saw you, I saw you?
Where have you been since I saw you?
On Ilkley Moor without a hat
On Ilkley Moor without a hat
On Ilkley Moor without a hat
You’ve been courting Mary Jane
You’re going to catch your death of cold
Then we will have to bury you
Then the worms will come and eat you up
Then the ducks will come and eat up the worms
Then we will go and eat up the ducks
Then we will all have eaten you
That’s where we get our own back

copyright m stanhope 2016

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DARWIN HARRIS

somerset-tadmoor-flooded-field

Although the determinants of family alliances in the 17th century appear to the continuing intermarriages within kinship groups; the desire to intermarry into families of a higher social strata (very often, the squirearchy); and the attraction of alliances with the prosperous merchant class, such simple description hides what inner need those determinants served, which was that of survival.

In an overarching sense, the English kinship group of the middling order was a “Darwinian species”, within which individual members combined to promote their survival, and to adapt to their challenging environment. They feared being reduced to the ranks of the landless poor, with the attendant stigma, and the draconian “mercies” of the English Poor Law.

In the harsh world of the Somerset levels, which will be considered anon, the choice of a son-in-law was of vital importance – in families with a preponderance of daughters, they were surrogate sons, who would be expected to assist in times of need and disaster.

A Harris family were established in the Somerset levels, especially in the Wedmore/Cheddar region, which can be decribed in order to gain an understanding of the difficulties they faced.

Wedmore is a Somerset village and parish, situated on slightly raised ground (called a “burtle”) in the Somerset Levels, between the Rivers Axe and Brue, thus being known as the Isle of Wedmore. The parish consists of main villages, such as Allerton, Blackford, and Wedmore, and 14 circling hamlets. It is located 4 miles south of Cheddar, 7 miles west of Wells, and 7 miles north west of Glastonbury. These distances are somewhat misleading as to the geographic nearness of families, in that those living in a nothern hamlet of Wedmore parish looked across an hedgerow to see Cheddar.

Immediately south of Wedmore are the peat-based Tealham and Tadham Moors, part of an extensive grazing marsh, the water table of which is high throughout the the year, with winter flooding being an annual feature of the overflowing of the River Brue. Generally, the whole area is prone to fresh water (and occasional salt water) inundation, the worst recorded example of which was the Bristol Channel floods of 1607, which resulted in the drowning of over 2,000 people, with houses and villages swept away, and an estimated 200 square miles of farmland flooded, and livestock destroyed. In 2013, this area also experienced ruinous levels of flooding.

This area is an important feeding ground for birds, and includes 32 Sites of Special Scientific Interest, which supports a growing tourism industry.

Agriculturally, about 70 per cent is used as grassland. Willow and teazel are grown commercially and peat is extracted.

Historically, Wedmore was a Saxon royal estate. Asser, in his “Life of Alfred”, described how Guthrum, the defeated Viking leader, celebrated his baptism in Wedmore.

The village of Blackford is bisected by a a tributary of the River Cam. Recent works to the riverbanks haved made flooding rarer than previously experienced. Being higher on the water-course, it was an area that supported sheep farming. By 1606 the principal farmers in Blackford were John Andrews and Richard Perry (of the West Country family of Micajah Perry of London), whose family intermarried with that of Symes. (See footnote 1.). In the Domesday Book, the manor is recorded as held by Turstin FitzRolf.

The village of Allerton (“Aelfweard’s settlement”) is situated a few miles southwest of Cheddar.

mapserv

The burial records of Wedmore parish show the Harris to be the neighbours in Allerton of the families of Hodges (1569), Hutchins (1578), Millard (1606), and George (1610). In Wedmore village, they were the neighbours of the Counsells (1583) and Hobbes (1595); and, in Blackford, were neighbours of the Lancasters.

The association of Thomas Harris, deceased in Virginia in 1688, who requested his orphan to be in the care of Hodges Counsell, stemmed from such associations.  The Hodges, Lancaster, and Symes family were the armigerous local squirearchy, around which local tenant families circled, hoping to form a familial alliance.
1. Sir John Symes, lived at Mells, m. Amy, da. of Thomas Horner esq., of Mells. 1.1. John Symes. 1.1.1. Thomas Symes Jr., evidenced here: Symes v Horner. Plaintiffs, Thomas Symes and Merrill Symes his wife. Defendants, Samuel Horner and Philip Horner. Subject: property in Mells, Somerset. (Nat. Arch., ref. C 5/64/111 1672). 1.1.1.1. ‘John Symes late of Montserrat, West Indies’.1.1.1.1.1. Elizabeth Symes (da., not sister), m. a kinsman, Samuel Perry. (See Nat. Arch., ref. C 11/750/12, 1714). 1.1.1.1.1.1. Symes Perry. 1.1.2. Richard Symes (See N&Q, 1890). 1.1.2.1. Adam Symes. 1.1.2.1.1. George Sims, of Brunswick Co.; d. Sept. 1763. He bought land from his brother John Sims, on 5 November 1747, witnessed by Micajah Perry, a cousin. 1.1.2.1.1.1. Adam Sims, m. Elizabeth Walton, da. of George Walton of Brunswick Co., and who was, thus, the br.-in-law of Nathan Harris, grandson of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, and br. of West Harris. (See Horner/Symes); (Somerset Families in Virginia).

It was not always the case of emigrants to Virginia wishing to sever their English connections; many sought to prosper in Virginia so as to return home to be on a more equal footing with their former lanlords.

The following genealogical tables are not constructions; the various registers consulted clearly state, in the majority of cases, the father, and, often, the mother, of the baptised.

They pose a problem of perception, in that familial associations of one branch of a family were “shared” with other relatives, a case in point being the marriage of Richard Harris and Elianor Bennett, at Wivelscombe, sister of Edward Bennett, of Lawne’s Creek; the benefits of this assciation being shared by close kin.

THE DESCENDANTS OF DARWIN HARRIS (THE TRUE HARRIS PROGENITOR REVEALED!).

1. Darwin Harris.
1.1. Thomas Harrys of Mells, carpenter, b. 1494.
1.1.1. John Harris, witnessed a deed concerning Mells in 1555.
1.1.1.1. John Harris, d. 1616, m. Alice, d. 1599, Mells.
1.1.1.1.1. John Harris, bapt. 17 Feb 1587, in Mells (St Andrew), m. 1. Grace Haine, in 1608, in Mells; 2. Mary Tomlin, 9 Nov. 1620, and was bur. 18 Oct. 1636, in Mells.
1.1.1.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Alice West, Oct. 1635, in Nunney (juxta Mells), d. in Charles City in 1677.
At a court held Sept. 13, 1677, administration of the estate of Thomas Harris, deceased, was granted to John Echols and John Hardaway, probable brs.-in-law of the said Thomas Harris. At a court held at Westover, on 17 Feb. 1678, John Hardaway and John Echols, on behalf of the orphans of Thomas Harris, deceased, brought suit against John Bland for 700 pounds of tobacco owed for an ox, which debt Mrs. Sarah Bland confessed to Maj. John Stith, guardian. (Ibid., p. 353).
Alice West was probably she who was bapt. 16 Sept. 1615, in Bath (St Michael), 12 miles from Nunney, and probable dau. of William West, who m. Katharin Pearce, 23 May 1608, in Bath (St Michael).
1.1.1.1.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 14 Aug. 1636, in Nunney. A Thomas Harris, on 3 March 1690, petitioned that John Echols be summoned to the next court (ibid., p. 338). This seems to be he who made a deposition in 1692 that he was 25 years old (B. 1, p. 52), and was the son of Thomas Harris, d. 1672, and his second wife, Alice Newman. He m. Judith Edwards, da. of Robert Edwards and Mary Hunt.* He died in 1712, his estate being appraised by Reuben Proctor, John Harrison, Philip Wheadon, and James Wilson, and was signed by Judith Harris on 23 Mar. 1712. (B. 2, p. 556). After his death his widow married … Clark. Was the Thomas Harris, bapt. 14 Aug. 1636, he who deceased in 1672?, and his son, the petitioner of 1690, the grandson of the Thomas Harris who deceased in 1677?; the potential son of Sergeant John Harris. *It may be of some significance that Nicholas Hunt married Edith Wheadon, on 23 Oct. 1593, in Milborne Port (St John the Evangelist), 20 mls fr. Nunney.
1.1.1.1.2. Elizabeth Harris, bapt 25 Oct. 1590, Mells, m. George Hill, 27 Jan. 1619, Mells.
1.1.1.2.2.1. Nicholas Hill, who, on 30 Sept. 1664, patented 750 ac. in the Upper Parish, part of the estate of Edward Bennett, of Wivelscombe, Somerset, and St Olave, London.
1.1.1.1.3. Anne Harris, bapt. 29 Apr. 1593, m. William Clarke, 3 Jun. 1616, Mells. .
1.1.1.1.4 William Harris, bapt. 3 Oct. 1602, bur. 5 Sep. 1662, Mells.
1.1.1.1.4.1. William Harris, bapt. 12 Jan. 1637, Mells, m. Mary Short, second-cousin of William Short, whose son and dau., John and Mary, m., respectively, Elizabeth Echols and Isaac Echols.
1.1.1.1.4.1.1. William Harris, probably m. a dau. of Nicholas Thompson, who witnessed a deed of Carter Crafford, of Lawnes Creek Parish, with Samuel Lancaster (see as follows), recorded 2 Nov. 1708. (B. 5, p. 401).
1.1.1.1.4.1.1.1. In 1756, Thompson Harris, of Bedford Co., ‘sells to William Heath’, who was a grandson of this William Heath: ‘Indenture between Wm. Lea & his wife Alice, and Wm. Heath, planter, of Southwarke Par., Surry Co., for a parcel of land, 150 acres, formerly Thos. Felton’s deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia commonly called Upper Chippoakes in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was (Sergeant) John Harryes (Surry B. I, 1652-1672, p. 161). If Sergeant John Harris of Virginia was synonomous with he bapt. 17 Feb 1587, in Mells, he had remarried shortly after his second marriage, and had returned to England before his death. The connection of a Tomlin family in Virginia to the Fulghams of Pitminster, Somerset, and Virginia (see Matthew Tomlin’s Will, pr. 9 Dec. 1686), and Matthew Tomlin’s son, Matthew, holding land bounded by ‘Thomas Harris’ Corner Tree’ (B. 2, pp. 570, 571), might lend some credibility to this proposition. Furthermore, if John Harris, as ‘Sergeant’, had a son by Grace Haine, born circa 1609-1612, it is possible that he was apprenticed at the time of his father’s arrival in Virginia, and did not accompany him, and this apprenticeship was in St Olave, Southwark, London (home of the Felton family), where an influential kinsman, Edward Bennett, of Wivelscombe, Somerset, and Virginia, had established himself.
Maj. William Rookings, son of William and Jane Rookings, who had patented Flying Point, on the Upper Chippokes, in 1638, was sentenced to death in 1677. His Will mentions his cousin, Mary Short’s children. Overseers and guardians were his brother-in-law, Capt. Nicholas Wyatt, of Charles City, and neighbours William Simmons and John King, of Upper Chippokes, all Bacon’s supporters. Mary Short was the wife of William Short, of Charles city Co., and grandmother of Mary Short, wife of the aforesaid William Harris. 1. William Short Sr., d. 1676, Charles City Co., m. Elizabeth Simmons, d. 1676. 1.1. William Short. Originally lived in Charles City Co., on the south side of the James River (later Prince George County); he repatented 1100 acres of land ‘above the head of Chippokes Creek about one and one-half miles up the western most branche’, identifying himself as ‘the son and heir of William Shorts’. The land had been granted to Robert Moseley on Jan. 7, 1649, and then assigned to William Short Sr., on Oct. 28, 1657. (See Tidewater Families of Virginia, p. 544). This was the land identified as adjoining that of Sergeant John Harris:
‘William Lea and Alice (Feltham), his wife, to William Heath, 150 acres … formerly Thomas Ffelton’s deceased, and lyeing and being in Southwarke Parish in the County of Surry in Virginia commonly called Upper Chippoakes in the woodes joyneing upon the lands which was John Harryes and neere unto the plantation which was formerly Robert Moseleys, adjoining to a great swamp which divides Surry Co. from Charles Cittie County … one hundred and fifteen acres of said land lyeth in Charles Cittie County adjoining unto the rest of the divident which lyeth in said surry County … Witnesses: Robert Spencer, John Gittings’. (Dated, Oct. 4, 1660. Surry Co. Court Records, R. 10 November 1660. 1.1.1. William Short. The Will of William Short was pr. Sept., 1741, in Surry Co., naming his wife, Susannah (Heath), his sons William and Thomas Short, grandchildren William, Sarah, Martha (ch. of William Short); granddau. Susanne (dau. of Thomas Short); da. Mary Harris; son-in-law William Harris; William and Thomas Harris (grandsons). He also mentions kinsman, Benjamin Heath, to whom he left two cows and calves. Peter and Sarah Vincent were the administrators. The witnesses were William Heath, Richard Jones, and Richard Bullock. The appraisers included John Mason, Christopher Tatum, and William Heath.
1.1.1.1.4.1.1.2. Thomas Harris, and wife, Sarah (Lane) Harris, Mary Lane and Faith Lane, sell ‘110 acres within the main Swamp and bounded by Col. John Allen’ (1741); daus. of Thomas Lane, d. in 1721 in Surry Co., father-in-law of William Harris.
1.1.1.2. Margery Harris m. John Allen, 8 Jun. 1567, Mells.
1.1.1.3. Elizabeth Harris, m. 1. John Bygges, 22 Sep. 1588, 2. Thomas Baylie, 3 May 1589.
1.1.1.4. Mary Harris, m. John Young, 21 Oct. 1588, Mells.

1.2. John Harris, of Wedmore (Allerton), m. 1. Joanna, d. 1579, 2. Alicia, d. 1585.
1.2.1. William Harris, m. Dorothy West, 31 Aug. 1562, Wivelscombe.
1.2.1.1. Richard Harris, m. Elianor Bennett, at Wivelscombe, sister of Edward Bennett, of Lawne’s Creek.

(1. Thomas Bennett, d. 1616, Wivelscombe, A br. of the afors. Elianor and Edward Bennett. 1.1. Thomas Bennett, claimed in 1635 as a headright by his uncle, Governor Richard Bennett. 1.1.1. Alice Bennett, m. John Hardy. Nugent, C&P vol. 1, p. 569: Mr. John Hardie 1150 acres IOW Co., 5 June 1666. Beginning at upper corner tree of Mathew Tomlin’s old land, running SSE by Wm. Westwrayer’s land &c. SW on Mathew Tomlin’s new land. John Hardy m. 2. Alice Tucker, widow of Arthur Allen. Her daus. were Katherine Allen, who m. Robert Johnson, and Joan Allen, who m. Dr Robert Williamson, John Burnett, and Reuben Proctor.
1.1.1.1. Lucy Hardy, m. Hodges Counsell, of Wedmore. 1.2. … Bennett, m. Richard Jackson, who patented 450 acres in IOW adjacent to Justinian Cooper. 1.2.1. Mary Jackson, m. Capt. George Hardy, who patented 500 acres on July 17, 1648 ‘lying on east side of Lawne’s Creek extending to main river and along the great river to the creek dividing the same from land of Alice Bennett’. On 19 June 1666, he made a deed to land which belonged to his wife Mary whom he refers to as the ‘daughter of Richard Jackson, dec.’. Her sister, Sarah Jackson, m. Col. Arthur Smith II. George Hardy was an appraiser of the estate of Edward Harris, d. 1677. 1.3. Richard Bennett. He lived at Blackwater, in the vicinity of the plantation of Justinian Cooper. In 1669, Thomas Wood, son of Arthur Wood and Sarah Wooten, his mother, ‘relict of Arthur deceased’, deeded him land as ‘Richard Bennett of Blackwater’. In 1666, Colonel Arthur Smith made a deed to land at ‘Blackwater’ inherited by his wife, Sarah Jackson, from her ‘grandmother Alice Bennett’. Richard Bennett’s first wife was Anne, who was Charles Barham’s sister (see Douglas Richardson, ‘Plantagenet Ancestry’). Mr. Charles Barham Ex., Thomas Harris (d. 1672) and Thomas Tuke overseers, were officers of the will of William Ridley, who was probably the br. of Elizabeth Ridley, Charles Barham’s wife
1.
1.1. William Tucke, m. Christian Holman, 18 July 1571, at Barwick, St Mary Magdalene, Som.; 22 mls fr. West Pennard, 27 mls fr. Wedmore; 40 mls fr. Wivelscombe. Margery Holman m. John Carter, 13 Aug. 1573, at West Pennard. 1.1.1. Thomas Tucke, m. Mary Collins, 26 Jan. 1604, Barwick. 1.1.1.1. James Tooke. December 1634, William Lacey leased James Tooke 500 acres on the east side of Lawne’s Creek; 26 October 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease. Will of James Tooke: Leg: Son Thomas, the tract on which I live being a Patent of 800 acres, also a patent called White Marsh and my seal signet ring to daughter Dorothy, the wife of John Harvey (Gov. NC) who are now at Southward; son William. Executor: Son Thomas. R. 2 Feb. 1662. Witnesses: Thomas Carter, Thomas Gwaltney. 1.1.1.2. Thomas Tooke, b. c. 1610, m. 1. Avis Mascoll, 7 June 1634, Barwick; 2. Mary … He witnessed the Will of William Ridley, with Thomas Harris, d. 1672. 1.1.1.3. William Tooke. 1.1.1.3. Elizabeth Tooke, m. Michael Ezell. 1.1.1.3.1. Elizabeth Ezell, m. John Atkinson Jr, son of John Atkinson and Ann Holliman. John Atkinson was the br. of James Atkinson, d. in IOW after 28 July 1723, who m. Mary Holman. John and James Atkinson were stepsons of Thomas Pitman, born of his third wife, Martha … by her first husb., Thomas Atkinson. Thomas Pitman’s dau, Elizabeth Pitman, m. Robert Lancaster Jr. In the list of tithables in 1702, Thomas was listed on the plantation of Richard Holman, who may have been his father-in-law, he having firstly m. Mary Holman. 1.1.2. Joane Tucke, m. William Penny, 22 Sept. 1588, Barwick. 1.1.2.1. Dorothy Penny, m. William Pitman, 10 Sep 1609 Horsington (St John); 15 mls fr. Barwick. 1.1.2.1.1. Thomas Pitman, of Virginia, b. c. 1614, by his deposition).

1.2.1.1.1. Thomas Harris, m. Judith Blake, 20 Nov. 1623, Wivelscombe. He was the second-cousin of (1) Anne Bennett, b. 1641, who m., 1st, Theodorick Bland of Westover; their son, Theodorick Bland (born 1663) m. Margaret Mann; their son, John Bland (born 8 Dec. 1698), m. Ann West; (2) Elizabeth Bennett, sister-in-law of Matilda Scarborough, who m. Lt. Col. John West. Margaret Mann was probably a da. of Thomas Mann, who, with his wife, Elizabeth, sold 150 acres on Blackwater River to Theophilus Joyner, adjoining property owned by William Mayo and (his br.-in-law) Bridgeman Joyner. (Will of Thomas Harris, d. 1688: ‘my sonne William Harris to live with Bridgeman Joyner seven years).

1.2.1.1.1.1. John Harris, d. 1687, m. Unity …
1.2.1.1.1.1.1. Elizabeth Harris, m. Samuel, son of Robert Lancaster Sr. and Sarah, widow of 2nd husband Richard Bennett Sr., d. 1710. B. 5, p. 224: Henry Baker deceased, estate dated 27 April 1701. Witnesses: Robert Lancaster Sr., Nicholas Sessoms, whose da. was Mary Blake, wife of William Blake; the Lancasters being intermarried with the Counsell family, of Wedmore.

1.2.2. John Harris, m. Joan Stubbs, 10 Feb. 1569, Wedmore (Blackford), bur. 27 Jan 1596, Servant of Robert Sherwell.
1.2.2.1. John Harris, of Wedmore (Allerton), bur. 31 Jul. 1599.
1.2.2.1.1. John Harris, bur. 21 Feb. 1624, m. Agnes, bur. 10 Aug. 1637.
1.2.2.1.1.1. John Harris, of Wedmore (Allerton), bapt. 13 Dec. 1612, bur. 16 Jan. 1626.
1.2.2.1.1.2. William Harris, bapt. 7 Dec. 1617, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.1.3. Christian Harris, bapt. 7 Dec. 1617, m. James Collins, 9 Oct. 1637, in Cheddar, juxta Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.1.4. Penelope Harris, bapt. 1 Nov. 1620, m. William Meade, 18 Jan. 1650, Wedmore; the Meades being intermarried with sich families as Coomer, Lancaster, Lane, Millard, and Simms.
1.2.2.1.1.5. Cybell Harris, bur. 22 Dec. 1626, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.2. Robert Harris. He was probably this Robert Harris: December 1634, William Lacey leased James Tooke 500 acres on the east side of Lawne’s Creek; 26 Oct. 1646, James Tooke to Robert Harris, all my right and title to this lease.
1.2.2.1.2.1. Edward Harris, bapt. 8 Aug. 1624, probably he who d. in 1677, in Virginia.

1.2.2.1.3. Benjamin Harris, of Wedmore (Blackford).
1.2.2.1.3.1. Adrian Harris, m. 1. Francis (2. Jean, bur. 13 Apr. 1684).
1.2.2.1.3.1.1. Joseph Harris, of Wedmore (Blackford), bapt. 6 Nov 1649.
1.2.2.1.3.1.2. Mary Harris, m. John Cutler, 7 Jun. 1669, Wedmore; the Cutlers being intermarried with the Andrews.
1.2.2.1.3.1.3. Elizabeth Harris, bapt. 15 May 1652.
1.2.2.1.3.1.4. Francis Harris, bapt. 26 Mar. 1655.
1.2.2.1.3.1.5. Benjamin Harris, bapt. 27 Dec. 1658, bur. 14 Jun 1660, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.3.1.6. Susanna Harris, bapt. 8 Jul. 1661, m. Robert Carter, 16 Feb. 1681, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.3.2. Joane Harris, m. Robert Lide, 4 May 1652, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.3.3. Susan Harris, bapt.6 Feb. 1619.
1.2.2.1.3.4. Joanna Harris, bapt. 4 Oct. 1623.
1.2.2.1.3.5. Elizabetha Harris, bapt. 23 Aug. 1635.
1.2.2.1.3.6. Benjamin Harris, bapt. 8 Jul. 1638
1.2.2.1.3.7. Julian Harris, m. George Lilly, 1 Jun. 1659.

1.2.2.1.4. George Harris, m. Joan Webb, 28 Apr 1623, Wedmore; the Webbs being intermarried with the Brownings, Coomers, Martins, Millards, and Haywards.
1.2.2.1.4.1. Mary Harris, m. Thomas Haine, 13 Oct. 1655, Wedmore; the Haines being intermarried with the Cookes, Lanes, Stokes, Stones, and Pitts.
1.2.2.1.4.2. William Harris, m. Anstice Kirby, 20 Jun. 1660, Wedmore; the Kirbys being intermarried with the James.
1.2.2.1.4.3. John Harris, bur. 7 Nov. 1696, m. Dorothy, bur. 17 May 1687, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.4.3.1. John Harris, bapt. 27 Apr. 1679, bur. 1 May 1740, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.4.3.1.1. John Harris, bur. 22 Nov 1761, m. Mary Rogers, 26 Dec. 1723, Wedmore, the Rogers being intermarried with the Coles.
1.2.2.1.4.3.1.1.1. John Harris, bapt. 12 Dec. 1731, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.4.3.2. Sarah Harris, m. James Hunt, 4 Aug. 1715, Wedmore.
1.2.2.1.4.3.3. Hannah Harris, m. Sammuel Trott, 21 May 1716, Wedmore.

1.2.2.1.5. Thomas Harris, m. 1 Joane. (2. Hester, bur. 24 Nov 1679), Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.5.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, Cheddar, probably he who d. in 1688, in Virginia.
1.2.2.2.5.1.1. Robert Harris, m. Anne Fulgham, da. of Michael Fulgham, of Pitminster, Somerset. Susannah Fulgham, Anne’s sister, m. Hardy Council, son of Hodges Counsell and Lucy Hardy. The continuation of the family of Thomas Harris, d. 1688, is decidedly problematic, with the “curtain of charity” being the kindest of responses. It is almost certainly the case that a number of his near kin followed him to Virginia, with their offspring being mistaken for his.

1.2.2.1.6. John Harris, m. Agnes Coomer, 4 Feb. 1635, Cheddar
(1. John Counsell, bapt. 1573. 1.1. John Counsell, bapt 28 Nov. 1601,’ f. Joannis Counsell‘, m. Mary Coomer, 26 Nov 1631; the sister of Agnes Coomer, who m. John Harris in the adj. parish of Cheddar, 4. Feb. 1635; uncle of Thomas Harris, bapt. 31 Dec. 1637, Cheddar. 1.2. William Counsell, bapt. 5 Aug. 1610, m. Mary Hayne. 1.3. Richard Counsell, bapt. 3 Sept. 1613 (fr. Blackford), m. (1) Joan Taylor, 12 Aug. 1640, (2) Elizabeth Hix, 12 Aug. 1647, dau. of William Hix and Grace Morton, m. 23 Jan. 1625, and niece of Margaret Hix, who m. Simon Day, 14 Jan. 1632. 1.3.1. Hodges Counsell. He was the very likely son of Richard Counsell, by either his first or second wife. Richard Counsell was the br.-in-law of Susan Lancaster, and Hodges Counsell may have received his Christian name after her husband, William Hodges (a member of the very influential Hodges family, squires of Wedmore), who was probably his Godfather).  (See Hickes/Hix – From Somerset to Brunswick County).
1.2.2.1.6.1. Arthur Harris, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.1.1. Arthur Harris, bapt. 23 Jun. 1663, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.1.1.1. Robert Harris, m. Mary Hill, 29 Jun. 1695, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2. Anthony Harris, m. Martha, bur. 13 Apr. 1662, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1. Anthony Harris, bur. 2 Apr. 1708, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.1. Caleb Harris, bapt. 21 Mar 1679, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2. Samuel Harris, bapt. 2 Jan. 1686, bur. 11 Oct. 1712, m. Hannah, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2.1. James Harris, bapt. 5 Oct. 1707, bur. 27 Dec 1767, m. Anne Carde, 11 May 1731, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2.1.1. Samuel Harris, bapt. 3 Apr. 1737, m. Lydia Maine, 17 Aug. 1769, bur. 2 Sep. 1772, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2.1.1.1. James Harris, bapt. 23 Sep. 1770, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2.1.2. Hannah Harris, m. James Maine, 9 May 1768, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.2.2. John Harris, bapt. 15 Jul. 1711, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.1.3. Martha Harris, bur. 13 Jul. 1708, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.3.1.4. James Harris, bapt. 21 Mar 1690, m. Hannah Marshal, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.3.1.5. Samuel Harris, bapt. 24 Jan. 1696, bur. 29 May 1729, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.3.1.6. Caleb Harris, bapt. 6 Oct. 1700, m. Susannah Martin, 7 Apr. 1729, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.3.1.6.1. Caleb Harris, bapt. 27 Jan. 1744, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.3.1.7. Edith Harris, m. Nimrod Martin, 10 Aug. 1732, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.2. Thomas Harris, m. Anne, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.2.1. Caleb Harris, bapt. 23 Mar 1689, bur. 26 Sep. 1728, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.2.2. Thomas Harris, bapt. 12 Jun. 1698, m. Anne Ball, 12 Aug. 1731, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3. Isaac Harris, bapt. 27 Feb. 1663, m. Dorothy Hayland, Apr. 1703, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1. Isaac Harris, bapt. 2 Nov. 1690, m. Mary, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.1. William Harris, bapt. 4 Feb. 1721, m. Jane White, 13 Jan. 1741, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.2. Jacob Harris, bapt. 25 Dec. 1731, m. Mary Meades, 2 Jun. 1756, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.2.1. William Harris, bapt. 1 May 1758, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.3. Jeffrey Harris, m. Mary Mary Star, 13 Dec. 1762, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.3.1. Jeffrey Harris, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.3.1.1. Jesse Harris, bapt. 20 Aug. 1797, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.3.1.2. William Harris, bapt. 16 Jun. 1799, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.4. Caleb Harris, bapt. 2 Apr 1735, bur. 29 Nov. 1778, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.1.5. Joan Harris, m. George Thomas, 4 Feb. 1760, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.2. Joseph Harris, bapt. 15 Nov. 1690, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.3. Robert Harris, bapt. 3 Jan. 1692, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.4. Anthony Harris, bapt. 2 Apr. 1710, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.5. Isaac Harris, bapt. 29 Mar. 1724, m. Joanna, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.5.1. James Harris, bapt. 14 Jan. 1757, Cheddar.
1.2.2.1.6.2.3.6.2. Francis Harris, m. Mary Wall, 1798, Cheddar. (See Wall and Rowe in Kinship Context).

Dancers of jigs, eaters of unpasteurised milk and cheese, drinkers of strong cider; talkers of a strange dialect; a social entity now despised.

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BLOOD FROM MONEY – HARRIS OF HANOVER

One of the great difficulties in tracing ancestries with the commercial hub of 17th century Southwark is seperating the components of ‘blood’ from ‘money’, that is, people who shared a surname and not ancestry would often be associated with the same merchants, falsely leading to suppositions of kinship.

These brief notes attempt to seperate these components, leaving a bare outline of a Harris family and their kin, who, by the principle of ‘continuation of association’, the principle feature of the English kinship system, were almost certainly they to be found in Hanover County, Virginia.

They are a seperate strand of Harris from those emanating from the marshes of Somerset or the rolling hills of Shropshire. There was no single family of Harris. This myth was passed down the generations as a cherished family heirloom, and is understabably difficult to part with, although of absolutely no value.

Those interested in this particular family might wish to persue any links between such as the Garretts and Peakes.

Where I have used the term ‘likely to be related’ and such like, an accuracy can be suggested, as the families covered were not numerous within St Olave.

St Olave or St Olave’s, Hart Street, Southwark,is one of the few surviving medieval buildings in London and the burial place of Samuel Pepys. It is a place of peace: John Betjeman described St Olave’s as “a country church in the world of Seething Lane”. It is first recorded in the 13th century as St Olave-towards-the-Tower, as a stone building. The present building dates from circa 1450. On the east side of St Olave’s, there is a stained glass window depicting Queen Elizabeth I standing with two tall bells at her feet. She held a thanksgiving service at St Olave’s on Trinity Sunday, May 15, 1554, while she was still Princess Elizabeth, to celebrate her release from the Tower of London.

1. Roberte Harris, bur. 22 Mar. 1626 (in the margin “chancel”) m. Margarite Haynes, 15 May 1570, likely to be related to Katherin Haynes, who m. Richard Ballarde, 18 Nov. 1577. To be buried in the chancel implies a high degree of status.
1.1. John Harris.
1.1.1. Thomas Harris, bapt. 26 Dec. 1597, ‘f John’.
1.1.2. Emma Harris, m. John Webb, 9 Feb. 1614. Anthonie Webb, who m. Susan Garrett, 25 Oct. 1604, very likely related to John Garrett, who m. Katharine Revell, 14 Nov 1626. Anthonie Webb was very likely related to Martha Webb, who m. Thomas Peake, 15 Nov. 1660, and Thomas Webb, who m. Sarah Thomas, 19 May 1667. She was likely to be related to Richard Thomas, who m. Elizabeth Bathurst, Oct. 1654, the equally likely parents of Francis Thomas, who m. Catherine …, parents of James Thomas, bapt. 5 Aug 1692.
1.1.3. Edward Harris, bur. 11 Jan. 1635 (in the margin “church”), m. Elizabeth …
1.1.3.1. Elizabeth Harris, bapt. 22 Dec. 1635.
1.2. William Harris, bur. 17 Apr. 1634 (in the margin “Churcheyarde”), m. Elizabeth Stanlie, 20 Feb. 1602. She was probably related to the William Stanley, who was a defendant in the case of Garland v. Stanley, regarding ‘money matters’, in London, in 1647). The same families were also involved in the case of Mary Garlande widow v. William Stanley and others in 1651, also concerning ‘money matters’ (Nat. Arch., ref. C 5/2/38). ‘William Garland, brewer’ who was the overseer of the Will of ‘Nicholas Hicks of St Saviour, yeoman’, proved January 21, 1603, in which he named Elizabeth Hickes his wife; George Hicks his brother; Katherine his sister, wife of Robert Willson, dwelling at Elmley Castle in Worcestershire; Audrey, his wife’s sister, the likely husband of William Garland (TNA, Prob.11/103, ff.58v-59r.).
1.2.1. Robert Harris, m. Margaret Garland, 8 April 1627.
1.2.1.1. John Harrris, m. Margaret Keene, July 1654.
1.2.2. William Harris, Elizabeth Arnell (Arnold), May 25, 1643.
1.2.2.1. John Harris, m. Hester Hankin, 26 Jan. 1664.
1.2.2.1.1. ‘Wm Harris and wife, Hennerettah, of parish of Fredericksville, Louisa, deed to Martin Baker of Hanover, for good causes, thereunto moving, part of tract granted by patent March 24, 1725 unto William Harris, and by said William given said Wm. Harris, his son, in will recorded (prior to 1734) in Hanover Co. (Louisa Co., Va, B. 2, p. 298).
1.2.2.1.1.1. ‘William Harris, Junr., m. Temperance Overton: ‘1500 acres, New Land, Hanover Co., adj. Mrs. Arnold and George Woodroof’s lines; on Overton’s fork of Elk Creek. April 11, 1732. (Nugent, C&P, vol. iii., p. 303, April 11, 1732).

William Harris Jr. was ‘Captain William Harris‘, and ‘William Harris, Gent., 76 acs. (NL), Hanover Co; beg. at James Glen’s corner; to N. side the Little River; on the Newmarket line; 24 Mar. 1725, 10 Shill.’ (ibid. p. 414). James Overton is recorded thus: ‘James Overton, 400 acs. (new lease), Hanover Co.; on N. side the S. fork of Elk Cr.; on John Raglin’s line; 20 Feb 1723, 40 shill’ (ibid. p. 389). Hanover County, 1706-1786, Vestry Book of St. Paul’s Parish (VBSPP), p. 107. At a Vestry being appointed at ye upper Church ye 7th of April 1724 being Easter Tuesday there was present: ‘Capt Peter Garland; Mr. John Anderson; Capt. William Harris; Mr. John White; Mr. Joseph Baughon; Mr. Jas. Overton – Church Warden. Register’d Jno Fitsgerrald Clk Vestry’. VBSPP, p. 116: At a Vestry held Lower Church in Saint Pauls Parish, January the Second 1726 – ‘Thomas Anderson and Charles Hudson were elected and appoint’d Vestry men in room of William Harris & James Overton having both first Subscribed the Test’. William Harris was the probable son-in-law of James Overton.
1.2.2.1.1.1.1. ‘John Harris, 400 acres New Land, Hanover County; adj. Ambrose Joshua Smith, Capt. Thomas Carr and Ann Arnold; on low side of Great Rockey Creek (See Griffiths, pp. 309-11). John Harris of Cedar Creek, who died before 1745, established the Quaker Meeting with John Stanley in 1721, it being assumed that he married Mary Stanley, John Stanley’s daughter, or niece.
1.2.2.1.1.1.1.1. Robert Harris and wife Lemenda, to Stephan Ragland, October 16, 1742, 60lbs for 230 acres. Robert Harris late of Hanover County Virgina, now of Bertie, land on Roanoak River adj. to Ragland at Turbevills Run. Witn. P. Smith, Nathaneil Hill, Jn., Arnold Brown, May court 1741.
1.2.2.1.1.1.1.1.1. Lemander Harris married Ephraim Hampton, the son of Andrew Hampton. Taxables for Granville Co, NC. 1754: Andrew Hampton and son, Ephraim. 1764: Andrew Hampton, sons John, Joseph, Ezekiel, and Ephraim. They were all taken by Robert Harris. Ezekiel Hampton was the father of Bridget Hampton, who married William Gutridge Garland. There issue included: 1. John William Garland, born September 4, 1785, in Washington Co., TN; died October 24, 1863,in Mitchell Co., NC; who married Rebecca Stanley, born January 27, 1795. 2. Bridget Garland, who married Swinfield Stanley, born 1797, died 1866. 3. Samuel Gutridge Garland, born 1795, died 1873, in Limestone Cove, Carter Co. (now Unicoi Co.) TN., who married Mary Stanley, born 1803, died 1878. 4. Telithia Garland, born May 22, 1798, died April 17, 1881, who married William Stanley, born February 17, 1798, died March 29, 1883.
1.2.2.1.1.1.2. Jemima Harris, m. William Overton, son of James Overton.
1.2.2.1.1.1.3. Robert Harris, m. Mourning Glenn (Will pr. 1776, Albemarle County; John Rodes and William Shelton, executors). She was probably the daughter of James Glenn. Book A, p. 486, November 27, 1752: ‘I, Robert Harris of Fredericksville Par., Louisa Co. For natural love and affection to my son-in-law, Willaim Shelton of afsd. Par. two mulatto slaves called Sherwood and Moses. Sig. Robert Harris. wit. Tyree Harris, Ben. Brown, Jr., Robert Wilson’.
1.2.2.1.1.1.3.1. Christopher Harris. VBSPP, p. 266: ‘The lands of Edw’d. Garland, Jas. Overton, Xpher. Harris, Jno. Glenn, Sam’l. Reynolds, Henry Farmer, Rob’t. Jennings & Abra. Venable being one precinct of which Edw’d. Garland and Jas. Overton were Overseers who made this return, the within Order executed in presence of James Glenn, Sam’l Reynolds, Abra. Venable, Henry Farmer, Mr. Robt. Jennings did not appear for his Land and Sam’l. Reynolds is all in one pattent and no Division’.

Addenda

1. ‘John Overton, of S’ Sepulchre’s, Lond., Stationer, Widr, ab’ 35, & Sara Garrett, of S’ Olave’s, Southwark, Spr, ab’ 28, alleged by John Garrett, of St Olave’s afs, Printer’, 1676. He was a likely close relative of the William Overton who married Elizabeth Waters, daughter of Samuel and Anne Waters, of St. Sepulchre, London, and sister of John Waters, who bought land from William Thornton, whose family were of St Olave’s. John Overton purchased pints from Stent that had been in the possession of William Peake (d.1639); brother of Sir Robert Peake (1592–1667), printseller, who died in 1667, and was buried in St. Sepulchre’s Church, London. As ‘Robert Peake goldsmith‘, he is entered in a subsidy roll for the Holborn Cross Precinct of St Sepulchre’s parish of 1641. The Will of Sir Robert Peake, citizen and Goldsmith of London, proved, London, July 26, 1667, bequeathed to to ‘my cousin and sometime servant, George Lyddall, of Virginia, gentleman, £300. George Lydall’s son, John Lyddall, patented land with William Overton, their properties adjoining, in New Kent. John Overton died in 1713. His will, signed in 1711, shows that he, his wife, and two of their children (Henry and Sarah), were all living in the White Horse. His bequests amounted to over £1,500 – a very large sum – and included capital sums to two other sons, Philip and James, to enable them to set up in trade; a fourth son Thomas had last been heard of in America in 1702.
1.1. James Overton, son of John Overton, the printer, was likely to be Captain James Overton. The fictitious birth and marriage records relating to the early Overtons of St Peters/St Pauls parish, Hanover, can be left without comment. Temperance Overton, on chronological grounds, was most likely a daughter or niece of James Overton. She married William Harris, descended from the Harris family of St Olave,Southwark, London.

1. Robert Peake, the Elder (c. 1551–1619).
1.1. William Peake (c. 1580–1639), painter and printseller, freeman of the Goldsmiths. William Webb (active 1628-45), print publisher, re-issued some sets of half-length women: the Four Complexions, the Seven Deadly Sins, and the Seven Liberal Arts (24). The first of these went to William Peake (d.1639); the last to Stent, and from Stent to John Overton, aforsaid (‘of S’ Sepulchre’s, Lond., Stationer’). John Overton’s father-in-law, James Garrett, would have known his fellow parishioner and printseller, Robert Peake.
1.2. Sir Robert Peake (1592–1667), died in 1667, and was buried in St. Sepulchre’s Church

1. Thomas Thornton. He is named in the Will of Sir Ambrose Nicholas Kt. Citizen and Alderman (Nat. Arch. ref. C 5/377/207), touching the ‘disposition of his twelve small tenements in Mugwell Street, St. Olave within Crepulgate, one named occupant being Richard Overton, Gent.
1.1. John Thornton, married (1614), Mary Ann Deddum (Dedman), in St. Olave, Hart Street.
1.1.1. William Thornton: he sold 600 ac. of land (‘the dower my wife Elizabeth’) to John Waters (Rappa. D.B. 6, p. 83, Nov. 4, 1679), son of Samuel and Anne Waters, of St. Sepulchre, London, and brother of Elizabeth (Waters) Overton.
1.1.1.1.Francis Thornton, m. (April 13, 1674), Alice Savage, daughter of Anthony Savage.
1.1.1.1.1. Francis Thornton; he bequested in his Will, dated 9 September 9, 1714, ‘To son John, the land lying on the branch of the Naull and Massaponax Rivers, about seven hundred and fifty acres, and two lots in Fredericksburg’. William Hampton, wool merchant, of London, was born May 28, 1592. He shipped wool from Virginia to his brother, Laurence Hampton, of London, a merchant tailor, who was the father of Thomas Hampton, whose Will (February 8, 1689), was witnessed by John Thornton (Boddie, p. 603).

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WALL AND ROWE IN KINSHIP CONTEXT

Bath is abt. 25 mls fr. Wedmore/Cheddar, where the Hickes interm. with the likes of the Cowncell family, and were, thus, of some status. The Chapmans were an influential and long established family of Bath. (See Transcript of indenture of lease between (1) Henry VIII and (2) Richard Chapman of Bathe, Somerset, clothier: of property in Somerset. (Nat. Arch. ref. LR 15/136).

Bath, Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, i.e. Bath Abbey:

1. Thomas Chapman/Elizabeth Kinge, 28 Jul. 1573.
1.1. William Chapman, bapt. 28 Sept. 1577.
1.1.1. William Chapman, Glover, m. Margaret …
1.1.1.1. John Chapman, bapt. 4 Feb. 1615, m. Edith Hickes, 14 Apr. 1645.
1.1.1.2. Katherine Chapman, bapt. 17 Nov. 1611, m. Richard Mayo, 19 Oct. 1640.
1.1.1.3. William Chapman, bapt. 7 Sept. 1609.
1.1.1.3.1. Anne Chapman, bapt. 27 Jul. 1647, m. Walter Hickes, 4 Feb. 1676.
1.1.1.3.1.1. Robert Hickes, bapt.13 Mar. 1683. 6 March 1738. Will of Robert Hicks: I, Robert Hicks, Gentleman of Brunswick. To my son Charles Hicks … To my wife Frances Hicks … To my son John Hicks … To my son James Hicks … To my son-in-law Richard Ransom … To my grandson Benjamin Hicks … To my son George Hicks … To my daughter Martha Beddingfield … To my daughter Frances Ransom … To my daughter Elizabeth Hicks … To my daughter Rachel Hicks … To my son Charles Hicks … To my grandson John Beddingfield … To my two daughters Mary and Tabitha. Executrix: my wife Frances Hicks. Wit. Ann Poythress, Charles Ross, John Chapman. (ibid.). Indenture, 28 July 1744, betw. Abigail Mayo of Brunswick, St. Andrews Par., and Michael Wall of same, £5, s side of falling Run, 100a, granted by pat. to James Mayo, 18 Feb. 1722. Signed Abbigail Mayo. Witnesses: Nathaniel Edwards, George Hicks, Rebecca Chapman, Thomas Rose. Indenture and memorandum proved by oath of George Hicks, gent, and Rebeccca Chapman, widow. (B. 3, p. 3).
1.1.1.3.1.2. Mr. John Hickes,  b. c. 1684, m. 1. Mary … Will of  John Hicks, dated the 30th day of September, 1728, and proved 20 Aug.1729. … Item, I give & devise unto my son Robt. Hicks & his heirs forever the tract of land I now live on & my wearing clothes & my will & desire is that my son Robt. shall goe and live with my son-in-law Edward Tatum until he comes to ye age of 18 years. Item I givwe & devise unto my two sons Jno. Hicks & Dan’l Hicks and their heirs forever my tract of land which I took up on Stevenss’ branch in Brunswick Co. to be divided between them & my will & desire is that my son John Hicks go and live with my son-in-law John Rose.
1.1.1.3.1.2.1. John Hickes, bapt. 24 Jan. 1706.
1.1.1.3.1.2.2. James Hickes, bapt. 17 Feb. 1713.
1.1.1.3.1.2. Mr. John Hickes, m. 2. …
1.1.1.3.1.2.1. Daniel Hickes,  b. c. 1720. Indenture made 25 Jan. 1745, between Thomas Hicks of the Province of North Carolina and Nathaniel Edwards of Brunswick Co., £40, 250a, is the lower part of a tract of land containing about 400 acs. whereon Daniel Hicks late of Brunswick Co. aforesd. at the time of his death did dwell & which said 250 acres of land the said Daniel Hicks by his last will & Testament dated 17 Dec. 1734 did devise to the said Thomas Hicks as by the said last will & Testament of the said Daniel Hicks duly proved and recorded in the County Court of Brunswick. Signed Thomas Hicks. Witnesses: John Wall, Jr., George Hicks, James Hicks, Jr. (son of George), John Irby, Jr. Henry Bedingfield, Francis Price. Court 6 Feb. 1745. (ibid. p. 141)
1.1.1.3.1.2.2. Abigail Hickes, m. John Rose.

1. …
1.1. Edward Wiche, m. Sara Chepman, 9 Feb. 1640, Bridgwater (St Mary). 16 mls fr. Wedmore.
1.2. Henry Wiche, m. Joanna Craftman, 5 Jun. 1645, Bridgwater.
1.2.1. Henry Wiche, bapt. 16 Jul 1664, Bridgwater (reg. f. Henry, mother Joan).
1.2.1.1. Henry Wyche.
1.1.1.1.1. Abigail Wyche, m. George Brewer (4 March 1734), son of George Brewer and Sarah Lanier, half-sister of Sampson Lanier Sr., who m. Elizabeth Washington; their son, Thomas Lanier, m. Anne Maclin, dau. of William Maclin Sr. and Katherine Brewer.

i.
1. Thomas Howse, m. ‘Susana Hixe‘, 28 May 1638, in Compton Martin, Somerset (St Michael the Archangel).
1.1. Thomas House, m. Francis Millard on 29 May 1664, in Compton Martin, she bapt. 10 June 1628, da. of Henry Millard and ‘Alison Hickes‘, who m. on 16 Apr. 1621. The Millard and Hix families were of the many threads that bound a densely-woven kinship network, including those of Harris, Hodges and Cowncell, which inhabited the swampy lands near Wedmore, Somerset. It is not an exaggeration to state that everyone was a cousin of sorts of everyone else.
1.1.1. James House, bapt. 1 Sept. 1666, Compton Martin. John Duke and John Taylor Duke witnessed the will of James House in Brunswick, 9 Feb. 1735.
1.1.1.1. Thomas House, bapt. 19 Mar. 1692, Compton Martin; f. James & Sarah.
1.1.1.2. James House, bapt. 13 Mar. 1697, in Compton Martin, f. James & Sarah.
1.1.1.2.1. Isaac House. Indenture made 5 June 1746 between Isaac House of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., and Richard Ramsom of same, £35, North side of the three Creeks, 84a. Signed Isaac House. Witnesses: John Wall, Junr., James Maclin, son of William Maclin.

John Wall/Elizabeth Rowe, 5 Apr. 1627, Wedmore (St Mary).

4 Feb. 1664. Prob. of will of Capt Jno. Wall decd. to Elizabeth Wall the relict. Will proved by oaths of Capt Fran. Grey & Richard Price.

Feb. 1694. Ordered that Henry Wyche and John Wall view a tobacco house built by John King for Edward Chilton and report how they find it at next court.

4 Mar. 1694. Order of last court for Henry Wyche and John Wall to view a house built by Henry King for Edward Chilton is recorded.

Sarah Wall m. George Wyche of Sussex Co.

John Wall, 970 acs., Brunswick Co.; on S. side of Maherin River; adj. John Carrell; Leadbetters Path; David Crawley; & George Walton’s land; 31 Oct. 1726. 200 acs. part granted him, 11 July 1719.

15 June 1744. To John Wall & William Macklin three thousand acres lying on Terrible Creek being a Branch of Staunton River in Brunswick beginning at John Walls upper Camp on the said Creek thence up & down for Quantity.

Will. 7 May 1744. I, Frances Hicks of B, being sick and weak but in perfect senses I order that no appraisement be made of my estate. Signed Frances Hicks. Wit. John Wall, Henry Beddingfeild, William Beddingfeild. At a Court held for B 5 Jul 1744, this will of Frances Hicks, widow deced, was presented in court by James Hicks, one of the executors, and the same was proved by the oaths of John Wall, Gent, and Henry Beddinfeild, two of the witnesses.

5 June 1746. From Isaac House of St Andrewís Parish in Brunswick, to Richard Ransom of same, for £35, one certain tract of about 84 acres of land on the north side of the three Creeks in Brunswick, and bounded by the creek a little above the Mill. Signed Isaac House. Wit John Wall Jr., James Maclin.

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of John Irby deced. Per Court order, we appraised the estate of Dr. John Irby. Ann Irby, Exíx. Signed Nathaniel Edwards, George Hicks, John Wall Jr. Returned to Brunswick Court on 3 Sep. 1747.

Inventory and appraisement of the estate of Richard Ransom decd, Brunswick Court order, we appraised the estate. Signed 26 Jan. 1748, John Wall Jr., Benja Seawell, George Wyche.

The Walls and Rowes  are, thus, identified.

copyright m stanhope 2016

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